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The week that was in Thailand news: We trusted in Thailand to change: At least she still makes us laugh!


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The week that was in Thailand news: We trusted in Thailand to change: At least she still makes us laugh!     Readers of this column will know that Rooster is not your archetypal Th

Amen!   The simple fact is that Thailand is in the middle of a serious financial crisis, and one that will get worse before it gets better. One solution, easy to do, would be to accelerate t

wow, that cynical headline was enough for me, no need to read further.   Thailand did and does a great job handling this crisis. Its tough, but if you look and compare how other  western cou

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Well,...Rooster,...

This one was one of your best !!!

I enjoyed it !!!

Best Regards !

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1 hour ago, Marpa47 said:

Wondering how the expression “grassed on” got its meaning ‘to inform on’.  as has found it’s way into numerous bylines this past week?  In the US of A there is a term, (grass roots), meaning a political movement originating among the common people.  But that term has some connection to it’s meaning since grass is kind of a symbol for something common and not of the upper class.  But “grassed on”?   Can’t imagine the connection although that’s probably the point. 

It's an English term, don't think it is really used elsewhere as it is believed to have roots in cockney rhyming slang which is of course native to London. Here is a short description from the internet.

 

There is another route to the word and this is via rhyming slang. Farmer and Henley's 1893 Dictionary of Slang defines 'grasshopper' as 'copper', that is, policeman. The theory is that a 'grass' is someone who works for the police and so has become a surrogate 'copper'. The rhyming slang link was certainly believed in 1950 by the lexicographer Paul Tempest, when he wrote Lag's lexicon: a comprehensive dictionary and encyclopaedia of the English prison to-day:

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3 hours ago, Marpa47 said:

Enjoying your many articles.  The personal touch in “the week that was” is as always a very rewarding read.  

I, for the first time in years enjoyed Rooster's article.

Keep it up and I might change my mind about you!!!!!

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1 hour ago, GAZZPA said:

It's an English term, don't think it is really used elsewhere as it is believed to have roots in cockney rhyming slang which is of course native to London. Here is a short description from the internet.

 

There is another route to the word and this is via rhyming slang. Farmer and Henley's 1893 Dictionary of Slang defines 'grasshopper' as 'copper', that is, policeman. The theory is that a 'grass' is someone who works for the police and so has become a surrogate 'copper'. The rhyming slang link was certainly believed in 1950 by the lexicographer Paul Tempest, when he wrote Lag's lexicon: a comprehensive dictionary and encyclopaedia of the English prison to-day:

Interesting, thanks for your input me ol' sparrah..

 

Rooster (a mockney)

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1 hour ago, GAZZPA said:

I have no doubt that Thailand did what it needed to do to suppress the virus, not taking anything away but I am getting very tired of the constant comparison to Western cultures crowning Thailand as the King of the virus tackling world. It is so well documented if you can bother to research about how the virus responds in different climates,  hot / humid weather is not a favourable environment. Add in many other factors such as the far more comprehensive transport systems, ease of travelling between countries / states, congestion and the tendency for longer distances for commuting and it very quickly becomes apparent why the virus has spread so quickly in countries in the Northern Hemisphere. Not to mention the obvious economic difference, people (including working class) have much more money to travel and shop. Short international flights are also very cheap and almost as common as catching a bus.

 

There is not 1 single country that got this right 100%, nobody in our lifetime has had to deal with such a thing so not really surprising, however I very strongly believe that if the virus had taken hold in Thailand and if Thailand had a temperate climate they would have faired no better then Italy, Spain, UK, Germany, USA or anywhere else that has struggled. 

 

It is, in my view, a cheap, tasteless and desperate attempt to try and label Thailand as "better at something" then the west. So before falling into the trap of assuming Thailand takes better care protecting it's citizens then lets say Germany, do some research, engage your brain and get your facts right. 

 

This is not a trivial topic to play silly games with, people are dying in enormous numbers.

Can't disagree with much of that. If the "facts" (for want of a better word)  do ever come out about the coronavirus pandemic they are likely to be years down the line.

 

Thanks for reading.

 

Rooster

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7 minutes ago, overt2016 said:

I, for the first time in years enjoyed Rooster's article.

Keep it up and I might change my mind about you!!!!!

I am glad this was more to your liking. 

 

Thank you for reading and commenting positively. 

 

Rooster

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9 minutes ago, Jane Dough said:

Interesting, thanks for your input me ol' sparrah..

 

Rooster (a mockney)

No probs me ol china, any other guff give us a tinkle on the dog and bone

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7 minutes ago, Jane Dough said:

Can't disagree with much of that. If the "facts" (for want of a better word)  do ever come out about the coronavirus pandemic they are likely to be years down the line.

 

Thanks for reading.

 

Rooster

Agree, it is early days for too many facts, however we do know that the influenza viruses does hold themselves better and linger longer in cool climates, that information is easily available and been around for a long time. It's why Autumn and winter are considered to be the "flu season" in the western world and why the flu jab is administered in preparation for that time of year. 

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9 hours ago, rooster59 said:

We trusted that a democratic government might end corruption within 20 years. Trusted that people who traverse its roads and waterways might one day all arrive safely at their destination. Trusted that the environment might be cleaned up, rejuvenated where necessary, despite the cost. Trusted that schools might one day deliver the finest education that promotes free thinking. Trusted that a police force that will go out of their way to maintain law and order and instill confidence in an admiring public might one bright day solve all crime. Trusted that in time the judiciary would act in the best interests of the common man utilizing a system of law easily accessed by all. Trusted that those in authority might begin to say it like it is and never once spout the complete opposite of what they mean. Trusted in a drive for more fairness….

And all those things have become less likely to ever happen through one hugely important bit of legislation that most Thai's don't even seem to know about - the introduction of a new constitution. Its hardly surprising that Thai's had little knowledge of the changes the new constitution would make to their lives - the ruling Junta banned political discussion about it and prevented political parties from campaigning on it during the run up to the referrendum that eventually saw its introduction.

 

I have yet to meet a Thai who knows that any future election result has to be approved by the Senate or that the membership of the Senate is controlled by the military - essentially ensuring that the military stay in control forever. Its hardly surprising then, that they could promise there would be no more coups.

 

The only things likely to change are those that benefit Thailand's elite and maybe a few 'spratts' thrown in to keep the people quiet.

 

I agree with others - that is probably the best 'Week that Was' that you've ever written.

Edited by KhaoYai
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7 hours ago, Matzzon said:

This sentence is brilliant! I really believe that the creator would have a very good career in the Thai government. It is clearly the best ever excuse and way to eliminate yourself from the masses. This gives you the right to "say what needs to be said" (When others do it usually called Thai bashing), at the same time that you can justify your bashing with another name. Fantastic!

Actually it's a paragraph, but thanks for reading anyway!

 

Rooster

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6 minutes ago, KhaoYai said:

And all those things have become less likely to ever happen through one hugely important bit of legislation that most Thai's don't even seem to know about - the introduction of a new constitution. Its hardly surprising that Thai's had little knowledge of the changes the new constitution would make to their lives - the ruling Junta banned political discussion about it and prevented political parties from campaigning on it during the run up to the referrendum that eventually saw its introduction.

 

I have yet to meet a Thai who knows that any future election result has to be approved by the Senate or that the membership of the Senate is controlled by the military - essentially ensuring that the military stay in control forever. Its hardly surprising then, that they could promise there would be no more coups.

 

The only things likely to change are those that benefit Thailand's elite and maybe a few 'spratts' thrown in to keep the people quiet.

 

I agree with others - that is probably the best 'Week that Was' that you've ever written.

It's a frightening thought isn't it. It is going to be down to the younger generation who are arguably becoming more globally aware and understanding of the political landscape that will change the fortunes of the country. Until the people decide enough is enough I can't see any brave, political figure making any headway in tackling the corruption and nepotism. In short no change in our lifetime. Sad but I think true.

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4 hours ago, Greg O said:

One things for sure, this place is a Riot ! Hehe 555.

 

 

Great column ..

Cheers and thanks for reading.

 

Rooster

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