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Burmese baby dies at birth after parents unable to afford Thai hospital

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40 minutes ago, Card said:

Have you paid for her treatment?

When we found out, yes, of course we did, and we support her and her baby until they can get back to Laos. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, loong said:

I thought that hospitals by law cannot refuse emergency/urgent treatment.

They can and they do.  I'm not sure what Oath doctors here take, but it doesn't appear to be the Hippocratic Oath that's for sure, or if it is, many don't seem to understand the significance of it. 

Edited by Pilotman

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A tragic story. But I wonder what kind of life the child would have had with the parents having so little money. I know it's not politically correct to say that if you can't afford to have a child then don't, but if you can't afford to have a child then don't. It isn't fair on the child and could lead to all kinds of social problems.

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22 hours ago, canopus1969 said:

That is so sad, should never happen in this day and age

But this is Thailand. 

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You think the Thais give any damn about it ?

Yes, ONLY because it came in an wide spread newspaper. Next week... nobody remembers this. 

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23 hours ago, webfact said:

Police found nothing suspicious and doctors reported the death as natural. Local authorities are funding the funeral rite.

A shame they couldn't fund the birth, it would have been a much better ending for all concerned.

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On 6/26/2020 at 3:18 PM, Sheryl said:

 

Actually  legal migrant workers can get covered under the 30 baht scheme. They have to pay about 1500 baht a year for it (and have a physical exam but then that is required for the work permit anyhow). Then receive a card that gives them same entitlements as a Thai at the registered hospital.

 

Employer usually has to go with them to register (or at a minimum provide copy of their tabian ban and, if the worker is not listed in it, then a letter or form attesting to where they live) and that may be a barrier for some.

 

I have 2 Cambodian household staff (well one really and then then the spouse and child,  but for visa purposes I list the spouse as also working for me).

 

Both have this cover and have used it extensively.


Why do it legal in bureaucratic Thailand if illegal works cheaper, easier and zero paperwork?

So much to ASEAN and AEC2015 (the start of which was moved from 1 Januar to 31 December 2015 on Yingluck's behest). All this is farce and non-Thai ASEAN citizen, on an illegal status in Thailand, are prone to misuse, mistreatment if not even abuse. This case is on file, hundreds if not thousands are not! 

This story clearly shows the priorities of the clowns-in-chief, plenty of tax payers cash for submarines which explains, why the have-nothings can lose a child during birth.

Shame on you all in the government and shame on the political power broker who runs the health ministry! 

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On 6/26/2020 at 6:12 PM, Pilotman said:

The Laos lady I was writing about earns 200 Baht per day (yes I know, not the minimum wage.  try telling her employer that) in a juice bar in Chon Buri and supports her family on that, plus a baby. The baby is Laos, so no benefits there and no help from anyone, bar a few kind local folk, without whom she and the baby would starve.  For someone like her, 1,500 Baht a year is not affordable. 

 

Yes, this is a major flaw with the system.

 

Even people making minimal wage, this is a lot of money -- especially since they are often having to pay back their employer fir the substantial cost of getting legal status (about 20,000 baht and for  4 years with an additional 2-3,000 at the 2 year point and that is just for the visa, does nto include the health cover). 

 

I pay the health cover cost for my employees and the only migrant workers I know of with it, same story- they can't pay it on their own. Nor can any of them afford to pay up front for getting the necessary L-A visa. I also pay that, including re-entry permit.

 

Including costs of visa and health cover etc, I am paying as much for my Cambodian staff as a Thai would earn -- if I could find a Thai to do it, which I can't, hence the migrants. Most Thai employers won't do this. Some foreigners won't either.

 

The problem is that many employers are unwilling to provide decent benefits or go to any trouble or expense  their workers, as they hire migrants in the first place in order to save money. And the laws and regulations do not put any clear onus onto employers of migrant workers. 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Sheryl said:

 

Yes, this is a major flaw with the system.

 

Even people making minimal wage, this is a lot of money -- especially since they are often having to pay back their employer fir the substantial cost of getting legal status (about 20,000 baht and for  4 years with an additional 2-3,000 at the 2 year point and that is just for the visa, does nto include the health cover). 

 

I pay the health cover cost for my employees and the only migrant workers I know of with it, same story. They can't pay it on their own. Nor can any of them afford to pay up front for getting the necessary L-A visa. I also pay that, including re-entry permit.

 

Including costs of visa and health cover etc, I am paying as much for my Cambodian staff as a Thai would earn -- if I could find a Thai to do it, which I can't, hence the migrants. Most Thai employers won't do this. Some foreigners won't either.

 

The problem is that many employers are unwilling to provide decent benefits or go to any trouble or expense  their workers, as they hire migrants in the first place in order to save money. And the laws and regulations do not put any clear onus onto employers of migrant workers. 

 

 

More power to you for your morals in looking after your staff. As you say "you can't find Thai staff to do it, which I can't, hence the migrants". Sounds a bit like the UK where the bone-idle live off their girlfriends and the state, the gf's pretending that they are single parents whilst their bf's are shacked up with them in housing provided by the state because they are 'single mothers', whilst old age pensioners can't even afford to have adequate heating, never mind the little 'luxuries' like decent food. The UK's 'Foreign Aid' program sends millions to Pakistan (yes they are the number one recipient) whilst this blxxdy country can afford to spend some 20%+ of their GDP on rockets etc and support terrorists - blxxdy scandalous. The UK should cease their Foreign Aid programs, most of which seems to end up in bank accounts which it was never intended to end up in. Look after your own first and foremost is my motto and sod the rest. 

 

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On 6/28/2020 at 2:10 PM, Sheryl said:

 

Yes, this is a major flaw with the system.

 

Even people making minimal wage, this is a lot of money -- especially since they are often having to pay back their employer fir the substantial cost of getting legal status (about 20,000 baht and for  4 years with an additional 2-3,000 at the 2 year point and that is just for the visa, does nto include the health cover). 

 

I pay the health cover cost for my employees and the only migrant workers I know of with it, same story- they can't pay it on their own. Nor can any of them afford to pay up front for getting the necessary L-A visa. I also pay that, including re-entry permit.

 

Including costs of visa and health cover etc, I am paying as much for my Cambodian staff as a Thai would earn -- if I could find a Thai to do it, which I can't, hence the migrants. Most Thai employers won't do this. Some foreigners won't either.

 

The problem is that many employers are unwilling to provide decent benefits or go to any trouble or expense  their workers, as they hire migrants in the first place in order to save money. And the laws and regulations do not put any clear onus onto employers of migrant workers. 

 

 

I understand in times of pandemics but there is no Covid-19 in Thailand (basically) they should be allowed to return to their countries. I don't know about the situation in Burma and Laos. What you explained regarding your employees is a perfect example of why borders should be completely abolished in terms of human movement. Fundamentally uneconomic and unproductive.

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