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Big bike ridden by British man catches fire after flipping on wet highway

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11 minutes ago, Dumbastheycome said:

When I still had my bike I experienced  some patches on uphill corners that were as slippery as ice.

Thai roads are very slippery at the best of times, my bike is still spinning the rear wheel in 3rd gear hard acceleration - the road paint is even worse as it has a gloss finish instead of the grippy sand surface you get in the UK

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7 minutes ago, smedly said:
23 minutes ago, Dumbastheycome said:

When I still had my bike I experienced  some patches on uphill corners that were as slippery as ice.

Thai roads are very slippery at the best of times, my bike is still spinning the rear wheel in 3rd gear hard acceleration - the road paint is even worse as it has a gloss finish instead of the grippy sand surface you get in the UK

Agreed - its easy to blame the roads here, because lets face it, there is often stuff spilt all over them, oil, grit, sand etc...  then there is the quality of the surface itself.

 

Time to get bored: The UK actually as a ‘British Standard’ for road aggregate - based around abrasion and ‘polishability’ only aggregate which meets a certain ’standard’ is allowed to be used (yes, I know, its boring that I know that) - Thai roads get polished, they are not at the same standard. 

 

That said: the ‘B’ roads in the UK are atrocious and have loads of pot-holes. My father in the UK has to change 1-2 tyres per year due pot-holes damage to the tyres. 

 

Thai roads seem to have fewer pot-holes than the UK, but in general, they are more slippy.

 

 

 

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This was the bike before it caught fire..

 

WeepyDismalEwe-small.gif

 

 

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11 hours ago, Puchaiyank said:

Was he trying to do a wheelie and it got away from him?  I think so!

A wheelie? On a curve?

LOL!

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8 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

Now try that in a corner - or better don't try it!

Don't try it?? 

 

Practice it in a car park. Straight, single turn, double turn, dry, wet. That's the difference between car drivers, casual riders and bikers. I've not ridden seriously in a few years - first thing I did was find some empty space and and recalibrate where the edge is. Not because I ride there intentionally, but because it makes me safer. What do you do when you need to brake in a corner? Just hope?

 

I understand there are a large number of casual riders here. Their riding standards and ethos are their own choice. That is not me. I don't commute or ride to buy some noodles or a couple of bottles of cheap beer. When I ride I ride all day; sun, wind or rain. I retake lessons every so often and I practice so I don't become the subject of a discussion here by people second-guessing how they'd have done it differently - like they ever know what actually happened.

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3 hours ago, richard_smith237 said:

Agreed - its easy to blame the roads here, because lets face it, there is often stuff spilt all over them, oil, grit, sand etc...  then there is the quality of the surface itself.

 

Time to get bored: The UK actually as a ‘British Standard’ for road aggregate - based around abrasion and ‘polishability’ only aggregate which meets a certain ’standard’ is allowed to be used (yes, I know, its boring that I know that) - Thai roads get polished, they are not at the same standard. 

 

That said: the ‘B’ roads in the UK are atrocious and have loads of pot-holes. My father in the UK has to change 1-2 tyres per year due pot-holes damage to the tyres. 

 

Thai roads seem to have fewer pot-holes than the UK, but in general, they are more slippy.

 

 

 

You can see the polished lines when at the right angle.

 

More interesting is you can see how the majority cut all corners. You will see the 'average line' shines a path into the emergency lane in left-hand corners and creep into the oncoming lane in rights. Obviously that smacks of being total retards, but try explaining that.

 

Driving here is not taken seriously. How often do you see the elder of a pair on a bike on the pillion? It's amazing to me how somebody would should take responsibility would put their life in the hands of the less experienced person. Now, that is somewhat of an assumption, but it can't alway be that the younger person is more experienced and it is almost always that the younger is riding with an older pillion.

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