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where to buy cheap European-style chocolate?

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2 hours ago, 4MyEgo said:

Has anyone ever read how high the sugar content is on chocolate, if you don't care and have a sweet tooth, well, what can I say, noting the cheaper the chocolate, the higher the sugar content usually, no thanks.

 

Actually no, as baking chocolate will often have little to no sugar and can be cheaper than a chocolate bar.

But I agree sugar is added to many foodstuffs as it is a relatively cheap ingredient.

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2 minutes ago, Eindhoven said:

 

Nope, you are wrong. A little research would have shown you this. It would have only taken you a few seconds.

 

The main difference is actually the sugar content. There may also be a differing ratio of cocoa butter.

 

 

I guess we'll have to disagree.  I've been cooking and baking with Chocolate for more years than I care to admit.  

 

If you're comparing 60% to 70% to 80%, or milk chocolate (about 10-20% cocoa) then yes, sugar content is different.  But chocolate with 70% cocoa is the going to be basically the same regardless of whether it comes in coins, blocks, or thin foil wrapped retail bars.

 

Of course there can also be a difference in the quality of ingredients, but as I've said, the Schmidt stuff is a good quality import from Europe.

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On 7/1/2020 at 10:55 PM, Trillian said:

High quality 100% cocoa powder, Tulip brand, is available in many supermarkets for about 125 baht per kilo. It makes excellent inexpensive drinking chocolate and if you really crave European chocolate bars, perhaps try making your own.

 

What is 100% cocoa powder? 125 baht per kilo? That stuff would be no good for making chocolate, 

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5 minutes ago, asiacurious said:

I guess we'll have to disagree.  I've been cooking and baking with Chocolate for more years than I care to admit.  

 

If you're comparing 60% to 70% to 80%, or milk chocolate (about 10-20% cocoa) then yes, sugar content is different.  But chocolate with 70% cocoa is the going to be basically the same regardless of whether it comes in coins, blocks, or thin foil wrapped retail bars.

 

Of course there can also be a difference in the quality of ingredients, but as I've said, the Schmidt stuff is a good quality import from Europe.

 

We can disagree, but I am right and you are wrong.

 

Baking chocolate can contain no added sugar at all, wherein high cocoa content bars will almost always have sugar added.

 

That is why it is call baking chocolate or cooking chocolate. Because it is different.

 

If it just a large piece of normal chocolate, then that is what it is. But baking chocolate and cooking chocolate is different.

 

Don't even get me started on cacao. I know my chocolate.

 

 

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3 hours ago, TallGuyJohninBKK said:

 

When it comes to chocolate, there's issues of taste, and then there's issues of health, which are entirely separate.

 

The sugary chocolate tastes great for those with a sweet tooth, but isn't very good for you in many ways.

 

On the other hand, the high-cacao chocolates (80-90%) have healthful properties if consumed in moderation.

 

If I remember right, ideally for health, you want the levels of protein and sugar to be about equal, 5g or so per serving....which is what you get with the 80-90% cacao varieties. But those also have a much more bitter taste than the typical store chocolates.

 

 

Interesting that you are comparing two completely different things. Which makes me thing that you are confusing them

 

Cacao and cocoa. Most commercial chocolate bars contain cocoa, not cacao. So I'll be interested in finding out to which bars you are referring, with 80-90% cacao.

 

I think certain companies just change the name for marketing purposes.

 

https://web.facebook.com/tulipchocolate/posts/cacao-vs-cocoa-what-you-need-to-knowcacao-cacao-is-the-purest-form-of-chocolate-/1742846232615015/

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17 minutes ago, Eindhoven said:

 

Actually no, as baking chocolate will often have little to no sugar and can be cheaper than a chocolate bar.

But I agree sugar is added to many foodstuffs as it is a relatively cheap ingredient.

Yes agree, I used to buy the 70% Cocoa baking chocolate in the usual form of a chocolate from Tesco/Lotus for about 62 baht and was quite enjoyable, sugar as you say was lower than the norm, but still b-a-d for this retired chocoholic 🙂

 

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The cheap Casino chocolate tastes too sweet, and does not contain much cocoa. 

I stock up on IKEA dark chocolate, maybe not the best in the world but better than a lot of the cheaper ones. 

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Posted (edited)
1 minute ago, 4MyEgo said:

Yes agree, I used to buy the 70% Cocoa baking chocolate in the usual form of a chocolate from Tesco/Lotus for about 62 baht and was quite enjoyable, sugar as you say was lower than the norm, but still b-a-d for this retired chocoholic 🙂

 

 

I have some high quality single estate bars imported from U.K in my fridge. I just keep them to share. Don't eat that kind of thing on my own usually.

Edited by Eindhoven

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9 minutes ago, Eindhoven said:

 

Actually no, as baking chocolate will often have little to no sugar and can be cheaper than a chocolate bar.

But I agree sugar is added to many foodstuffs as it is a relatively cheap ingredient.

 

Sugar is added to all chocolate, except of course unsweetened chocolate.  And while unsweetened chocolate is the core chocolate used when baking (since one adds sugar as a separate ingredient), it is absolutely not the only chocolate used when baking. 

 

An example.  Great brownies will use mixture of unsweetened, 75%, 60%, and milk chocolates  (could even sneak in some white chocolate (which isn't technically chocolate of course).  The unsweetened gets melted and mixed into the batter with sugar, flour....  The others get chopped up into pieces and added to the batter so they bake into gooey little pockets of chocolate. 

 

I've never heard of chocolate chip cookies using unsweetened chocolate.  A mixture of chocolates (excluding unsweetened) is the way to go.

 

Also, never try to melt chocolate chips sold in bags advertised with cookies on the label (Nestle, Hersey's, Ghirardelli, Tulip...).  They have stabilizers in them that help them to hold there shape when they bake (fine for cookies) but they end up a clumpy mess when melting.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, Eindhoven said:

 

What is 100% cocoa powder? 125 baht per kilo? That stuff would be no good for making chocolate, 

 

Hey, we can agree on that!

 

17 minutes ago, Eindhoven said:

 

Interesting that you are comparing two completely different things. Which makes me thing that you are confusing them

 

Cacao and cocoa. Most commercial chocolate bars contain cocoa, not cacao. So I'll be interested in finding out to which bars you are referring, with 80-90% cacao.

 

I think certain companies just change the name for marketing purposes.

 

https://web.facebook.com/tulipchocolate/posts/cacao-vs-cocoa-what-you-need-to-knowcacao-cacao-is-the-purest-form-of-chocolate-/1742846232615015/

 

And we can agree on this too!  Amazing!

 

image.png.558845035f150473861777f8efa692b0.png

Edited by asiacurious

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On 6/30/2020 at 7:42 PM, dimitriv said:

 

16 Baht is 48 Euro cent.  For 48 cent you can buy a Mars or Snickers in Europe. 

 

When was the last time you visited Europe ?  50 years ago ?  🤔

 

 

 

It's actually possible. LIDL sell Bellarom milk and plain chocolate bars for around £0.35p for a 100 gram bar. That is between 13 & 14 baht.

 

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/food/food-reviews/g669487/milk-chocolate/

 

 

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7 minutes ago, asiacurious said:

 

Hey, we can agree on that!

 

 

And we can agree on this too!  Amazing!

 

difference-between-cocoa-and-cacao-33764

 

I like good food. 🙂

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16 minutes ago, asiacurious said:

 

Sugar is added to all chocolate, except of course unsweetened chocolate.  And while unsweetened chocolate is the core chocolate used when baking (since one adds sugar as a separate ingredient), it is absolutely not the only chocolate used when baking. 

 

An example.  Great brownies will use mixture of unsweetened, 75%, 60%, and milk chocolates  (could even sneak in some white chocolate (which isn't technically chocolate of course).  The unsweetened gets melted and mixed into the batter with sugar, flour....  The others get chopped up into pieces and added to the batter so they bake into gooey little pockets of chocolate. 

 

I've never heard of chocolate chip cookies using unsweetened chocolate.  A mixture of chocolates (excluding unsweetened) is the way to go.

 

Also, never try to melt chocolate chips sold in bags advertised with cookies on the label (Nestle, Hersey's, Ghirardelli, Tulip...).  They have stabilizers in them that help them to hold there shape when they bake (fine for cookies) but they end up a clumpy mess when melting.

 

 

 

No. It is called Baking/Cooking/Unsweetened chocolate because that is what it is.

 

Of course you can cook with any kind of chocolate. But that chocolate is not called Baking/Cooking/Unsweetened chocolate.

 

I use normal high quality 60 to 85% cocoa content bars to make brownies and adjust the sugar content to compensate. I might also chuck in some Belgian chocolate pieces for a fudgey/caramelly distraction or some Swiss chocolate for a hint of hazelnut within.

 

So of course you are not limited to Baking/Cooking/Unsweetened chocolate. 

 

My point is that Baking/Cooking/Unsweetened chocolate is a thing and not only different because of the shape and wrapping, as you suggested. It's a completely different product.

You also contradict yourself by stating that sugar is added to all chocolate, but then confirm that there is unsweetened chocolate....which happens to be Baking/Cooking chocolate. 

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4 hours ago, TallGuyJohninBKK said:

When it comes to chocolate, there's issues of taste, and then there's issues of health, which are entirely separate.

 

. . . the 80-90% cacao varieties . . . also have a much more bitter taste than the typical store chocolates.

It rather depends. The sugar addicted will of course need their fix and a nearer day of reckoning. But if you don't need it, then you can get used to the bitter taste and even grow to prefer its in-your-face, take-no-prisoners jolt. It's a bit like growing to like strong black coffee, and notably expresso, after weaning yourself from that pussy milk-and-sugar confection. Yeah. Hit me!

 

You can of course combine super dark chocloate with something artificially sweetened or naturally sweet. A few raisins works quite well.

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