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where to buy cheap European-style chocolate?

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Posted (edited)

The only reason that I would go out of my way to use unsweetened chocolate in a Brownie recipe, would be if someone was diabetic or wanted to avoid sucrose for one reason or another.

Then I would use unsweetened and substitute sucrose for fructose.

 

Seems pointless to use unsweetened, then to add sucrose and further to chuck in 75%, 60% and milk chocolate. All with copious amounts of sucrose within.

Edited by Eindhoven

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Posted (edited)
43 minutes ago, Eindhoven said:

 

No. It is called Baking/Cooking/Unsweetened chocolate because that is what it is.

 

 

Ok, so it's basically coming down to semantics.  Wikipedia says:

 

Quote

Baking chocolate, also referred to as bitter chocolate,[1] cooking chocolate[2] and unsweetened chocolate,[3] is a type of dark chocolate that is prepared for use as an ingredient in baking.[1]

 

But Wikipedia also says:

Quote

 

It is typically prepared in unsweetened,[1] bittersweet[2] semisweet[5] and sweet varieties,[6] depending on the amount of added sugar.

Recipes that include unsweetened baking chocolate typically use a significant amount of sugar.[6] Bittersweet baking chocolate must contain 35 percent chocolate liquor or higher.[6] Most baking chocolates have at least a 50% cocoa content, with the remaining content usually being mostly sugar.[1]

 

 

 

And plenty of other sources refer to baking chocolate as any of those various preparations (unsweetened, bitterseet, semisweet, and sweet).

 

I had a good laugh at the bit you wrote about contradicting myself!  "Sugar is added to all chocolate, except of course unsweetened chocolate" contains no contradiction.  It contains a clearly stated exception to a general rule.  But if either of these help....

 

Sugar is added to all other chocolate except of course to unsweetened chocolate?

 

Or...

 

Except for unsweetened chocolate, all chocolate has sugar added.

 

Though for me, I prefer my original statement.  Actually, I prefer this even more for it's succinctness:

 

Sugar is added to all chocolate except unsweetened chocolate.

 

 

Perhaps we should discuss carob next? :biggrin:

 

Edited by asiacurious

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, asiacurious said:

Ok, so it's basically coming down to semantics.  Wikipedia says:

 

 

But Wikipedia also says:

 

 

And plenty of other sources refer to baking chocolate as any of those various preparations (unsweetened, bitterseet, semisweet, and sweet).

 

I had a good laugh at the bit you wrote about contradicting myself!  "Sugar is added to all chocolate, except of course unsweetened chocolate" contains no contradiction.  It contains a clearly stated exception to a general rule.  But if either of these help....

 

Sugar is added to all other chocolate except of course to unsweetened chocolate?

 

Or...

 

Except for unsweetened chocolate, all chocolate has sugar added.

 

Though for me, I prefer my original statement.  Actually, I prefer this even more for it's succinctness:

 

Sugar is added to all chocolate except unsweetened chocolate.

 

 

Perhaps we should discuss carob next? :biggrin:

 

 

Since you are using Wikipedia as your source, is there any reason you left out these salient points?;

 

Quote

Baking chocolate may be of a lower quality compared to other types of chocolate, and may have part of the cocoa butter replaced with other fats that do not require tempering.[4] This type of baking chocolate may be easier to handle compared to those that have not had their cocoa butter content lowered.[4] Lower quality baking chocolate may not be as flavorful compared to higher-quality chocolate, and may have a different mouthfeel.

 

 

I know you read it, but of course it counters your argument that it is exactly the same as normal chocolate.

 

It is not. 

 

Baking/cooking chocolate is designed for baking and cooking.

 

 

Also interesting;

 

Quote

as less sugar than sweet varieties. In Europe, a regulation exists stating that semisweet varieties must contain more sugar and less chocolate liquor compared to bittersweet varieties. No such regulation exists in the United States, and due to this, semisweet and bittersweet varieties can vary in sweetness and chocolate liquor content. In the U.S., bittersweet varieties are even sometimes sweeter than semi-sweet varieties.

 

The USA has very low or no food standards overall, due to lobbying of corporations.

For that reason alone, I don't use American products in my diet or cooking. It's generally of a lower quality than European foodstuffs.

Edited by Eindhoven

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Posted (edited)
On 7/3/2020 at 12:43 PM, Eindhoven said:

It's actually possible. LIDL sell Bellarom milk and plain chocolate bars for around £0.35p for a 100 gram bar. That is between 13 & 14 baht.

 

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/food/food-reviews/g669487/milk-chocolate/

 

The reason they are cheap, they contain only 35-45% cocoa , with milk and other added ingredients. 

Edited by balo

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, balo said:

The reason they are cheap, they contain only 35-45% cocoa , with milk and other added ingredients. 

Lidl and Aldi pure chocolate is 52% cacao.

 

The Casino pure chocolate is also 52% cacao, and is available at Big C extra at 139 Baht for 2 x 200 gram

Edited by Susco
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The German brand "Ritter Sport" you can get at BigC in many different varieties.

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16 minutes ago, balo said:

The reason they are cheap, they contain only 35-45% cocoa , with milk and other added ingredients. 

Plain chocolate does not contain milk, even the cheap stuff. It might contain butter. It's 52%, that particular bar.

 

 

Sugar, cocoa mass, cocoa butter, concentrated butter (milk), emulsifier: sunflower lecithin, natural vanilla flavour.

 

https://world.openfoodfacts.org/product/20430746/chocolat-noir-bellarom

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53 minutes ago, CNXexpat said:

The German brand "Ritter Sport" you can get at BigC in many different varieties.

When I was younger this was one of my favorites but it is far too sweet over here.

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40 minutes ago, Eindhoven said:

Plain chocolate does not contain milk, even the cheap stuff. It might contain butter. It's 52%, that particular bar.

 

 

Sugar, cocoa mass, cocoa butter, concentrated butter (milk), emulsifier: sunflower lecithin, natural vanilla flavour.

 

https://world.openfoodfacts.org/product/20430746/chocolat-noir-bellarom

For health reasons i only allow 4 squares of dark chocolate these days. My wife has to hide the rest lol.

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In Europe a 100gr bar costs about 1 euro. That's the cheaper one. 85% cocoa. 12-16 is really cheap. A hundred thb per a hundred gram is pang mak. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, A1Str8 said:

In Europe a 100gr bar costs about 1 euro. That's the cheaper one. 85% cocoa. 12-16 is really cheap. A hundred thb per a hundred gram is pang mak. 

 

I just illustrated that it does not.

 

Even Fairtrade products can cost less than 1 Euro

 

https://www.lidl.ie/p/p16838

Edited by Eindhoven

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2 hours ago, Susco said:

 

The Casino pure chocolate is also 52% cacao, and is available at Big C extra at 139 Baht for 2 x 200 gram

If you like plain dark chocolate then this, for me, is the best ongoing value that is easily available, and has been for the past 5 years or more.

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3 hours ago, Susco said:

Lidl and Aldi pure chocolate is 52% cacao.

 

The Casino pure chocolate is also 52% cacao, and is available at Big C extra at 139 Baht for 2 x 200 gram

 

It's cocoa, not cacao. 

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