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UK says China's security law is serious violation of Hong Kong treaty

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UK says China's security law is serious violation of Hong Kong treaty

By William James

 

2020-07-01T121134Z_3_LYNXMPEG603BU_RTROPTP_4_CHINA-HONGKONG-SECURITY-BRITAIN.JPG

Britain's Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab makes a statement on Hong Kong's national security legislation in London, Britain, July 1, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

 

LONDON (Reuters) - The United Kingdom said China's imposition of a security law on Hong Kong was a "clear and serious" violation of the 1984 Joint Declaration and that London would offer around 3 million residents of the former colony a path to British citizenship.

 

Hong Kong police fired water cannon and tear gas and arrested nearly 200 people as protesters took to the streets in defiance of sweeping security legislation introduced by China that they say is aimed at snuffing out dissent.

 

"The enactment and imposition of this national security law constitute a clear and serious breach of the Sino-British Joint Declaration," Prime Minister Boris Johnson told parliament on Wednesday.

 

Johnson said Britain would stand by its pledge to give British National Overseas (BNO) passport-holders in Hong Kong a path to British citizenship, allowing them to settle in the United Kingdom.

 

Almost 3 million Hong Kong residents are eligible for the passport. There were 349,881 holders of the passports as of February.

 

Hong Kong's autonomy was guaranteed under the "one country, two systems" agreement enshrined in the Sino-British Joint Declaration signed by then Chinese Premier Zhao Ziyang and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

 

Hong Kong was handed back to China on July 1, 1997, after more than 150 years of British rule - imposed after Britain defeated China in the First Opium War. China had never recognised the "unequal treaties" allowing Britain's rule of Hong Kong island, the Kowloon peninsula and later its lease of the rural New Territories.

 

HONG KONG ROW

 

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said Britain had carefully assessed China's national security legislation since it was published late on Tuesday.

 

"It constitutes a clear violation of the autonomy of Hong Kong, and a direct threat to the freedoms of its people, and therefore I'm afraid to say it is a clear and serious violation of the Joint Declaration treaty between the United Kingdom and China," Raab told Reuters and the BBC.

 

Authorities in Beijing and Hong Kong have repeatedly said the legislation is aimed at a few "troublemakers" and will not affect rights and freedoms, nor investor interests.

 

Raab said he would set out shortly the action Britain would take with its international partners.

 

"China, through this national security legislation, is not living up to its promises to the people of Hong Kong," Raab said. "We will live up to our promises."

 

Asked about how the West should deal with Chinese President Xi Jinping, Raab said:

 

"Obviously, China is a leading member of the international community. And it is precisely because of that, that we expect it to live up to its international obligations and its international responsibilities. For trust in China's ability to do that, today has been a big step backwards."

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-07-01
 
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This  is an intriguing situation. The UK  condemns the legitimate "owners" of  a territory for  introducing  security  legislation. The USA  is dismantling  protocols  that were back door  access  to involvement in trade  that due  to sanctions were  closed off  at the  front  door.

Who is  leaning  on who really?

But  I hope  good  luck and  best wishes  for those  that  take up the supposed opportunity to  bolt  to the UK. Their employment  chances  are.........? Or  is the  attraction of  Hong Kong $ preferential the  key ?

 

I wonder if we will ever  get introduced to  the  Conductor  of this  strange  orchestral?

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17 minutes ago, yuyiinthesky said:

The people of Hong Kong obviously want to keep their freedom. Easy to understand. Who wouldn't? They show what makes humans humans, they have lost already, cannot win, but they don't give up. Admirable! And that is what gives them a tiny chance to win, if we all support them.

 

The people of Hong Kong and they alone should decide about their future. 
 

#standWithHongKong

I think I'm going to repeat much of what I said in a previous thread.

 

I'm very happy that the UK is, finally, offering BNO's full UK residency.

They should have done it in 1997, pity it took a Beijing crackdown to make the UK do the right thing!

 

Trouble is they is really little support the outside world can give HK, other than to give Hong Kongers a way out.

 

I was flabbergasted when I read in a previous thread where a posters accused the US of 'throwing Hong Kong under the bus' after Pompeo announced the removal of special treatment to HK, which was based on the autonomy enshrined in the handover agreement, which Beijing seems perfectly fine to tear up!

 

In Congress there are currently several bipartisan bills which would give special refugee status to Hong Kongers similar to the refugee status given to students after Tiananmen.

Similar efforts are going on in Taiwan, while tiptoeing around antagonizing Beijing.

 

So I think we are seeing support as much as we can. The US can impose some sanctions, as ineffectual as I fear they will be.

But the UK can't do anything for fear of retaliation, and the EU will just do what they always do, waffle

 

 

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this'll be too latefor all those arrested since a few days ago

 - may soon be British citizens, in a CCP Gulag

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43 minutes ago, GinBoy2 said:

I think I'm going to repeat much of what I said in a previous thread.

 

I'm very happy that the UK is, finally, offering BNO's full UK residency.

They should have done it in 1997, pity it took a Beijing crackdown to make the UK do the right thing!

 

Trouble is they is really little support the outside world can give HK, other than to give Hong Kongers a way out.

 

I was flabbergasted when I read in a previous thread where a posters accused the US of 'throwing Hong Kong under the bus' after Pompeo announced the removal of special treatment to HK, which was based on the autonomy enshrined in the handover agreement, which Beijing seems perfectly fine to tear up!

 

In Congress there are currently several bipartisan bills which would give special refugee status to Hong Kongers similar to the refugee status given to students after Tiananmen.

Similar efforts are going on in Taiwan, while tiptoeing around antagonizing Beijing.

 

So I think we are seeing support as much as we can. The US can impose some sanctions, as ineffectual as I fear they will be.

But the UK can't do anything for fear of retaliation, and the EU will just do what they always do, waffle

 

 

I was one of the people who have said the current US administration has thrown HK under the bus. 
 

Trump has paid little or no attention to human rights or civil liberties, even In his own countries. Bolton has said that trump essentially didn’t care if the CCP went ahead with the internment camps in western China. 
 

Dictators see this lack of spine as license as a way to push the boundaries, which they have. They didn’t even need to think twice on it. 

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2 minutes ago, samran said:

I was one of the people who have said the current US administration has thrown HK under the bus. 
 

Trump has paid little or no attention to human rights or civil liberties, even In his own countries. Bolton has said that trump essentially didn’t care if the CCP went ahead with the internment camps in western China. 
 

Dictators see this lack of spine as license as a way to push the boundaries, which they have. They didn’t even need to think twice on it. 

I'm not going to defend Trump's nonsense, but you do understand thats the job of Congress, not POTUS. Congress  passed the 'Uigher Human Rights Act', 413-1, and was then approved in the Senate which placed sanctions on China.

 

I haven't seen any other country doing anything else than use waffling words

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Posted (edited)

 

China definitely does not want a war with the West, and is only behaving like it is because it knows the West will not start one.

 

If Sun Tzu was advising the West, he would tell it that this was precisely the time to attack.

 

 

Edited by Enoon
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Telling the media that 3 million Hong Kong Chinese might be allowed to live and work in Britain might be a dangerous PR stunt. The Beijing government might respond by having an attitude of "So you want to give 3 million Chinese the right to live and work in Britain, well, we (China) can give you an extra 10 million Chinese if you're willing to take them" .      🙂

 

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15 minutes ago, tonbridgebrit said:

The poster was not trying to say that it is a conspiracy. Is it okay if you yourself use a bit of time to understand the issue ?

Okay, Britain has offered about 3 million Hong Kong Chinese the right to live and work in Britain. But I think we need to get real here, there's no way Britain is going to allow 3 million people to do this. It's just not going to happen.

So, why make the offer, in front of the media ? It's being done to make the Beijing government look bad. It's being done to antagonise Beijing. It's part of the PR (public relations) war, a PR campaign to make China look bad.

Too late now they have offered a lifeline, maybe that's why Boris wants to build more houses and roads. China could even revoke Chinese citizenship to them.

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