Jump to content
BANGKOK
webfact

'Help!' cry British musicians, warning of crisis in live music industry

Recommended Posts

'Help!' cry British musicians, warning of crisis in live music industry

 

REUTERS.jpg

FILE PHOTO: Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones performs between band members Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood during their No Filter U.S. Tour at Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California, U.S., August 22, 2019. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni/File Photo

 

(Reuters) - Paul McCartney, Ed Sheeran and The Rolling Stones were among some 1,500 musicians who called on Thursday for the British government to help the live music business survive the novel coronavirus outbreak.

 

“The future for concerts and festivals and the hundreds of thousands of people who work in them looks bleak,” the musicians wrote in an open letter to British Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden.

 

“Until these businesses can operate again, which is likely to be 2021 at the earliest, government support will be crucial to prevent mass insolvencies and the end of this world-leading industry.”

 

The letter called for a clear timeline on when music venues could reopen, as well as support for businesses and jobs.

 

Dowden responded to the musicians in a tweet bit.ly/3dQmayJ on Thursday saying he is "pushing hard for these dates & to give you a clear roadmap back". He said decisions on reopening of live music venues would be difficult as it relates to the future of social distancing.

 

Music venues, concerts and festivals - including the annual summer Glastonbury festival - were shuttered or cancelled in March when the COVID-19 pandemic took hold in the country.

 

Britain, whose death toll from pandemic is approaching 55,000, showed a Reuters tally of official data sources, is in the process of gradually reopening retail stores, schools and pubs.

 

The musicians in the letter said live music added 4.5 billion pounds ($5.6 billion) to the British economy and supported 210,000 jobs across the country in 2019.

 

The appeal was signed by musicians across genres and generations, including Rod Stewart, Eric Clapton, Bob Geldof, Coldplay, Sting and Dua Lipa, as well as producers and operators of concert halls and clubs.

 

(Reporting by Leslie Adler in New York and Ann Maria Shibu in Bengaluru; Editing by Christopher Cushing)

 

reuters_logo.jpg

-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-07-02
 
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are the last people deserving of any help, nobody really needs them for one thing

  • Confused 1
  • Sad 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A 1,200 pounds cheque to Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger would certainly go a long way in helping them during these difficult times...

  • Haha 2
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Of course, this is my opinion.....

The time has changed.  The musicians' live concerts were creative, they changed the world with their lyrics and guitar sounds.  The triumph of Blues, Rock and Jazz in the 70s and 80s led to a bland and creative crisis.  In virtually decades there was no Internet or mobile phone.  I have enjoyed the live music of many groups that sadly have disappeared or have simply given their all.  I wouldn't pay a dime to see current singers live.  As I said ... times have changed.  Nothing new to say or create as it was done in them decades ago.

Edited by Tarteso
  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there any live music in the UK now? I doubt it. One of the things i love about Pattaya is the many, great live music acts they have (had).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Orton Rd said:

They are the last people deserving of any help, nobody really needs them for one thing

See how much they earn in exports. More than a lot of other industries. £5.2bn in 2018.

Remember, at one point Abba were doing more for Swedish exports than their timber industry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Orton Rd said:

They are the last people deserving of any help, nobody really needs them for one thing

Some earned many millions. For others: sorry to say, but why so many have to be resqued by tax payers money ? 

Same for football players.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mrfill said:

See how much they earn in exports. More than a lot of other industries. £5.2bn in 2018.

Remember, at one point Abba were doing more for Swedish exports than their timber industry.

And therefore tax payers money has to flow to multi-millionairs ?

Sorry, but those, who can survive on their own feet, have to do so, is MY opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, puipuitom said:

Some earned many millions. For others: sorry to say, but why so many have to be resqued by tax payers money ? 

Same for football players.

Because you're associating all footballers and musicians with multi millionaires. The vast majority are just scraping a living 😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, webfact said:

Help!' cry British musicians, warning of crisis in live music industry

Everyone is effected by the Wuhan Flu Virus, That doesn't mean that everyone can go and Cry to the Government and Beg for Assistance/Money. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...