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Brewster67

Cheesemaking In Thailand.

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Cheese making in Thailand have been discussed on several occasions on TVF but mostly by hobbyist and not by medium to large producers such as yourself, and that is the first time i hear that large producers are hogging the milk market, Thai people not being cheese eaters or big on milk drinkers but perhaps the milk production are indeed in short supply,

I know the guys that run HomeMade-Cheese Co and i'll try to ask him where does source his milk from that is if he be willing to share such info...

 

 

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please contact me  (email address removed by Moderator - of interested PM the poster)

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I've wondered about "Thai" cheese as well as it all seems to be imported. Not a huge dairy industry here (lots of cows, not a lot of dairy). In the g/f's home village there must be a couple hundred cows and I've yet to see anyone milk any of them.

It is one of the "cultural" differences between Asians and "Westerners". We like cheese and don't eat dogs. A lot of Asian cultures balk at the idea of deliberately adding bacteria to something (like cheese), but happily eat dog.
Things are changing though, thanks in large part to "fast food" items like cheeseburgers and pizza.

I like my sharp cheddars. Over here I mostly end up buying Mainland Epicure or Bega "Strong and Bitey". 

Occasionally I'll buy some Maasdamer if I can find it (in block form, not the pre-sliced stuff which tastes "watered down"). Problem with the Maasdamer is I'm sure it's been frozen then thawed (at least once) before hitting the shelf. Something in the cheese crystallizes when it's frozen and stays that way after thawing. Despite the original wrapping and then the additional cellophane wrapping it gets here, I sometimes find the cheese has dried out around the edges by the time it hits the store shelves as well.

I've also endulged in a bit of Roquefort now and then (usually diced and added to a salad). Problem is, even the smallest wedges tend to be too much for me to eat before it goes bad.
(I'm a fan of Blue Cheese Salad Dressing too. I use it on my Som Tam salad quite often to give it a different flavour.)

I've often wondered if a dedicated Cheese Shop would do OK over here, perhaps in a Mall or other high-traffic tourist area. In addition to local and imported cheeses you could also offer the ingredients to "make your own" (like the beer hobby stores do).

The girlfriend is doing an apprenticeship in Germany right now. Last year one of the courses she was sent on was cheese making (seems she's not a fan of it). Piqued my interest though as it occurred to me that would be one way of getting some locally (and I have a bit of spare time on my hands these days, as in, pretty much all day everyday).

However I'd need to look at it a lot closer before trying to commit to making any myself. Seems a bit complicated but probably gets easy once you "learn the ropes". Or would that be "learn the rennets" ? (A cheesy bit of humour to Brie-ten up your day !) :w00t:

(What does the "whey" go after the curds are removed ?) :blink:

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hello, Kerrid, post 4

Every time I make cottage cheese, we drink the whey we love.
In addition, it is good for inflammatory problems, against certain bacteria.

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21 minutes ago, Genmai said:

image.jpeg.360807314afcd341113566f6dfe06f32.jpeg


74396711_10158328577984220_6985918347197807388_o.thumb.jpg.4fed1bb7480de92121b49776c22bbe6f.jpg

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Yes, the issue with milk supply exists. If you wanna go big, you need to make a special arrangement with one of supplayers

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16 minutes ago, Kerryd said:


74396711_10158328577984220_6985918347197807388_o.thumb.jpg.4fed1bb7480de92121b49776c22bbe6f.jpg

Truly sad.....

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17 minutes ago, PETERTHEEATER said:

Truly sad.....


I've eaten plenty of "pok pok" plain and after a while it starts tasting bland. And the local vendor throws the chilies in whole and when he's done, most of them are still whole so you end up eating whole, raw chilies and I started to dislike the taste of them. Still like the heat, just not the taste.

(It was the same with Tabasco sauce years ago. At first it was OK. After awhile everything started tasting the same and it was - tedious.) 

And Papaya salad is just that. Salad. Some different ingredients and preparation methods but not that much different than a chef's salad or other green salad. 

Nothing "sad" about it. No law or tradition says you have to eat Papaya salad plain every single time for your entire life.

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The Thai "ROYAL PROJECT" brand makes good Feta cheese (good price also) and I think "CAROLINE" brand is Thai too

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7 minutes ago, Kerryd said:

And Papaya salad is just that. Salad. Some different ingredients and preparation methods but not that much different than a chef's salad or other green salad. 

Nothing "sad" about it. No law or tradition says you have to eat Papaya salad plain every single time for your entire life.

 

This is not a criticism of you - but if you're having to squeeze goops of chunky blue cheese dressing from a bottle onto a dish to make it enjoyable maybe the problem is with the plate of pickled bait with shredded raw fruit and rotten fish juice in front of you... God almighty up in heaven and all that is holy - if I've learned anything from living in Thailand it's an appreciation for how underrated and CIVILIZED a good burger or steak w/ fries are.

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Posted (edited)

I get raw milk from local coop; price 25THB per litre. Has been tested.

I make Kefir cream cheese, about 2-3 kilo per week. A very simple and tasty cheese eaten fresh.

We eat it as part of our keto diet http://www.ibsexplained.com

This cheese is fermented, and the fermentation process overcomes problems with bacterial contamination.

Kefir is a colony of 50 or so yeasts and bacteria that will eliminate foreign micro-organisms.

 

I worry about milk supply in the future, perhaps the government may get silly and ban raw milk sales.

Cheese from pasteurized milk is junk. Then I will need to get a house cow/goat.

Edited by Brahmz
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