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Brianbighead

Travelling with 13 year old son to the US

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Posted (edited)
Hi, I'm looking to go to the US with my son (permanently)
Can he leave Thailand on his new US passport? He's never been overseas before and never had a Thai passport
I don't want to get a Thai passport as we won't be returning for at least 10 years & therefore it seems pointless 
 
What is the legal standing for a dual citizen travelling ? Is there a section of Thai Law that pertains to this
I don't want to have a problem at the airport
 
Also, is there a standard letter of consent form for the mother to sign to allow me to travel with him?
 
Thanks
Edited by Brianbighead

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mother has to go to amphur and sign official paper giving permission for her child to travel

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Just now, Bender Rodriguez said:

mother has to go to amphur and sign official paper giving permission for her child to travel

The amphur where the child is registered, or any amphur?

Any idea what she need to take?

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2 hours ago, Brianbighead said:

The amphur where the child is registered, or any amphur?

Any idea what she need to take?

Not sure about Amphur, but no doubt the one where registered

House book (blue )

Birth cert 

Maybe ID card 

I would also like to ask something 

 

 Trying to get wife & son to Auss

Not sure if I can get wife to Auss but they say imediate family 

Son (12 yr ) will come as Auss Citz if get Passport 

! I did have to go to Thai consulate to get letter to renew Sons Thai passport to send wife in thailand

? Since son is Auss Citz would I have to give permission for son to come back to Auss (I hope this would not require a trip into Sydney )

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Being a Thai citizen, born here, his US passport has no entry stamp. I guess he won't be able to depart Thailand without a Thai passport. Another point is - getting a Thai passport while here is very easy and fast process. Whenever he returns to Thailand he can either renew the Thai passport in the US or just enter on the expired passport and get a new one here. Getting a first Thai passport while overseas is a more complex and longer process. So the best and easiest way to travel with him would be to exit Thailand on a Thai passport and enter the US on the US passport. There is no problem in Thailand regarding dual nationality

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Go to immigration and ask if a Thai passport is needed?  Perhaps immigration could simply supply a TM6, much like they would if the original was lost or it someone got a new passport.  If he departs with a Thai passport and arrives with a US passport, US immigration may want to see the exit stamp so they know where he came from.

The US does not recognize dual citizenship, however, no one seems to care.  Many people have two passports, including my daughter, and there has never been an issue.

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I believe children under 15 are exempt any immigration "penalty", so if your son was to leave Thailand on his US passport they'd be no charge for what is technically an "overstay". 

However, why would you not want him to dual nationality? My son is 8 and has both UK and Thai nationality and travel documents, he will leave/enter Thailand on his Thai passport and enter/leave UK on his British one.

 

Also if you do not get permission from the child's Thai legal custodian, you could be charged with child abduction, be careful.

 

Take the advice already given above and get written permission from the Amphur.

 

 

 

 

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On 7/5/2020 at 9:21 PM, AAArdvark said:

<snip>

The US does not recognize dual citizenship, however, no one seems to care.  Many people have two passports, including my daughter, and there has never been an issue.

Not quite true;

 

Does the United States allow dual citizenship?

Yes, practically speaking. The U.S. government does not require naturalized U.S. citizens to relinquish citizenship in their country of origin. Although the Oath of Allegiance to the United States speaks of renouncing “allegiance and fidelity” to other nations, U.S. immigration law does not explicitly address the topic of dual citizenship. The best summarization of the U.S. government’s position on dual citizenship lies in a U.S. Supreme Court opinion, which explains that “a person may have and exercise rights of nationality in two countries and be subject to the responsibilities of both.” The U.S. Department of State also has a more technical discussion of dual citizenship.

Just because the United States allows dual citizenship, however, doesn’t necessarily mean your country of origin does, too. Some countries, such as China and India, will not recognize your status as a naturalized American on their soil. You may even lose your citizenship automatically in those countries upon becoming a U.S. citizen. It’s therefore important to understand the dual citizenship rules in your country of origin before pursuing U.S. citizenship.

 

https://www.boundless.com/immigration-resources/dual-citizenship/

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