Jump to content
BANGKOK
snoop1130

'It's a very emotional time' - Hong Kongers pack memories for new life overseas

Recommended Posts

'It's a very emotional time' - Hong Kongers pack memories for new life overseas

By Carol Mang Natalie Thomas

 

2020-07-09T114621Z_1_LYNXMPEG680VC_RTROPTP_4_HONGKONG-SECURITY-IMMIGRATION.JPG

FILE PHOTO: A Star Ferry boat crosses Victoria Harbour in front of a skyline of buildings during sunset, as a meeting on national security legislation takes place in Hong Kong, China June 29, 2020. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu/File Photo

 

HONG KONG/LONDON (Reuters) - When college graduate Wong, 23, leaves Hong Kong to escape Beijing's new national security law, it will be his friends, the stunning views over Victoria Harbour and the city's famous dim sum he will miss the most.

 

Wong is joining a flood of fellow Hong Kongers fleeing what they see as a more authoritarian era under the legislation, which punishes acts of secession, subversion, terrorism and colluding with foreign forces with up to life in prison.

 

China says the new law is vital to plug gaping holes in national security defences exposed by months of sometimes violent anti-government and anti-China protests that rocked the city over the last year.

 

Waving a Union Jack flag, Wong and his family attended some pro-democracy rallies and called on the British government to support residents of its former colony, an act that could now violate the vaguely defined law.

 

Wong said while the prospect of a new life in a different country is exciting, his family is also fraught with sadness.

 

"When you pack everything, you're packing your memories in Hong Kong. You got photos and toys from childhood, you are packing your memories into a box and sending them to a foreign country, so it's a very emotional time," he told Reuters.

 

"Hopefully I can pack up everything," said Wong, who declined to give his full name for fear of retribution.

 

Wong's parents, an accountant and social worker, both have British National Overseas passports, providing them a path to citizenship in the United Kingdom, where they will fly to next year.

 

Wong hopes to accompany them but says if he can't due to visa issues, he will consider South Korea until he can join his parents and members of his extended family, who are also leaving for the United Kingdom.

 

The speed at which Beijing raced through the legislation and a lack of transparency until it took effect close to midnight on June 30 drew criticism from all corners of the world, including Washington, Ottawa, London, Taipei and Japan.

 

On Thursday, Canberra said it was suspending its extradition treaty with Hong Kong and announced measures to attract people and businesses from the global financial hub.

 

The Chinese government has condemned foreign interference in the affairs of its freest city.

 

A Hong Kong immigration lawyer told Reuters she had been inundated with inquiries from people eager to get to Britain since the law was introduced, with a noticeable spike in the number of extended families seeking information.

 

"One of my friends is a teacher in Hong Kong. She's been teaching for over 10 years and she said she has four siblings and the five families altogether they want to move," said Janine Miu, Managing Director at UK Immigration Specialist.

 

Miu said she had also seen a shift in the demographic of people rushing for the exit, from more wealthy and experienced people to younger individuals and couples with small children.

 

Critics of the law fear it will be used by mainland and local authorities to crush dissent in Hong Kong, while supporters say it will bring stability after months of unrest.

 

Although China's law also applies to activities abroad, Wong plans to lobby overseas support for those he leaves behind.

 

"I will not turn my back on my own people," he said.

 

reuters_logo.jpg

-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-07-09
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, snoop1130 said:

Critics of the law fear it will be used by mainland and local authorities to crush dissent in Hong Kong

then there is no more Hong Kong, no more S.A.R.; local authorities were already proxies for the mainland

  • Like 2
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a catastrophe!

Without the SAR privileges, HK is just like any other Chinese province, just wasteland.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

1933, Germany. Those that could, started to flee and many more in the years following. Dictatorships and authoritarian juntas use the same handbook.

Edited by Benmart
Reword

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hong kong is gone.  Curtains!  Over!  Time to move on...China is taking it forever. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting analogy from a friend who has lived in HK for 50 years and has no intention of leaving.

 

"Some people here remain convinced that China should have acted out of character and given in to the whims of a few hundred vandals when they have many more similar and bigger issues to deal with.

 
Look at it as if it was Thailand and the security law is LM." 
 
Puts it in perspective a little?
  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i also was in hong kong many years   good place good people why like many say why change 

greedyness   money power very crasy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

said Wong, who declined to give his full name for fear of retribution.

"Joshua" by any chance????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very sad, but China's aim to make HK a huge naval base for it's South China Sea exploits (photo Jinan Missile Destroyer):-

 

 

Jinan Number 152 Missile Destroyer Editorial Photo - Image of ...

 

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...