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glegolo

Muscle relaxant medicines

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Posted (edited)

My wife have been diagnosed with Myofiscial pain syndrom. It is an muscle-condition-thing of some sort. The doctor at Bangkok Hospital gave her;

MYONAL 50 MG (EPERISONE) - NSAID drug
ETORICOXIB 90 MG
 
My wife now tells me that these medicines do not do anything at all painwise for her...My thinking is... Why not try muscle relaxant medicines....
 
So my question is, hopefully also "SHERYL" read this, if you can be so kind and advise me of any medicin availible here in Thailand in the group of muscle-relaxant medicines....
 
Thanks for your input guys,
glegolo
Edited by glegolo

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Posted (edited)

Carbamazepine, its an off the shelf usage, its an old drug easily available at the pharmacy.

Acupucnture is also worth a try



Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), as such  is a mystery syndrome 

AS such the terminology here is SYNDROME and there is no divinitive cure.
Carbamazepine can Reset Facial Nerve Endings 
As far as muscle relaxants go none have actually been proven to be beneficial for MPS
You could try Diclofenc cream and massage it into the jaw muscle area just under the ears
5 Days is all Carbamazepine should be used for in such a case.
You could try Flexeril  but again for a limited period a 2005 study said it had no evidence it helped MPS but it is stronger with potentially less addictive side effects of others.

 

EPERISONE is in the class of muscle relaxants/

It is an interesting syndrome and of course without knowing your wifes age diet other ailments weight and many other things its almost impossible to really say and out guess trained medical personnel.

The other medication covers a few other things Gout included 

So the doctor has covered all the bases his hands are tied 

Good luck 

 

Massage therapy using trigger-point release techniques may be effective in short-term pain relief.[7] Physical therapy involving gentle stretching and exercise maybe useful for recovering full range of motion and motor coordination. Once the trigger points are gone, muscle strengthening exercise can begin, supporting long-term health of the local muscle system.[8]

Myofascial release, which involves gentle fascia manipulation and massage, may improve or remediate the condition.[9]

A systematic review concluded that dry needling for the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome in the lower back appeared to be a useful adjunct to standard therapies, but that clear recommendations could not be made because the published studies were small and of low quality.[10] (See also: <deleted>'s subcutaneous needle)

Posture evaluation and ergonomics may provide relief in the early stages of treatment.[11] Gentle, sustained stretching exercises within a comfortable range of motion have been shown to lessen symptoms. Regular, non-intense activity is also encouraged.[12]

Edited by andy72

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, andy72 said:

Carbamazepine, its an off the shelf usage, its an old drug easily available at the pharmacy.

Acupucnture is also worth a try



Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), as such  is a mystery syndrome 

AS such the terminology here is SYNDROME and there is no divinitive cure.
Carbamazepine can Reset Facial Nerve Endings 
As far as muscle relaxants go none have actually been proven to be beneficial for MPS
You could try Diclofenc cream and massage it into the jaw muscle area just under the ears
5 Days is all Carbamazepine should be used for in such a case.
You could try Flexeril  but again for a limited period a 2005 study said it had no evidence it helped MPS but it is stronger with potentially less addictive side effects of others.

 

EPERISONE is in the class of muscle relaxants/

It is an interesting syndrome and of course without knowing your wifes age diet other ailments weight and many other things its almost impossible to really say and out guess trained medical personnel.

The other medication covers a few other things Gout included 

So the doctor has covered all the bases his hands are tied 

Good luck 

 

Massage therapy using trigger-point release techniques may be effective in short-term pain relief.[7] Physical therapy involving gentle stretching and exercise maybe useful for recovering full range of motion and motor coordination. Once the trigger points are gone, muscle strengthening exercise can begin, supporting long-term health of the local muscle system.[8]

Myofascial release, which involves gentle fascia manipulation and massage, may improve or remediate the condition.[9]

A systematic review concluded that dry needling for the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome in the lower back appeared to be a useful adjunct to standard therapies, but that clear recommendations could not be made because the published studies were small and of low quality.[10] (See also: <deleted>'s subcutaneous needle)

Posture evaluation and ergonomics may provide relief in the early stages of treatment.[11] Gentle, sustained stretching exercises within a comfortable range of motion have been shown to lessen symptoms. Regular, non-intense activity is also encouraged.[12]

Thank you so much for sharing, it i well noted.. I will besides your good info also try out the brandnames you mentioned to me.. thnks again..

 

But some stuff bothers me in what you are saying. I have myself in Sweden been on muscle-relaxants for more than a decade, and no one told me that these medicines were a threat to the body, as you do...... So WHY only use them for that short period of time;  Flexeril and Carbamazepine

 

 

glegolo

Edited by glegolo

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@glegolo 

Carbamazepine is not a muscle relaxant https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbamazepine
and to try reset nerve pain 3-5 days is the max after that its just a waste of time
some muscle relaxants are very addictive
Flexeril is not https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclobenzaprine
but still although MPS can be described as chronic Flexeril is associated with Acute conditions 

although I have suggested these please read carefully obviously i do not know what other meds your wife may be on or other pre existing conditions she may have

As such MPS is a grey area open to limited experimentation different things will help different people
Carbamazepine has had success in limiting or reversing pain in the trigemenal nerve around the cheekbone.
https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/trigeminal-neuralgia-tic-douloureux-a-to-z

It may or may not help along with effective muscle relaxant acupuncture etc.

I'm not a doctor so take any advice very carefully.

As for the relaxants you have been on for a decade 
There are many non addictive
Though some can cause gastric problems which is why they may be enteric coated to minimise such.
I would say that a decade is a very long time but again I know nothing about why you take these so again my opinion is one based on ignorance

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33 minutes ago, andy72 said:

@glegolo 

Carbamazepine is not a muscle relaxant https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbamazepine
and to try reset nerve pain 3-5 days is the max after that its just a waste of time
some muscle relaxants are very addictive
Flexeril is not https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclobenzaprine
but still although MPS can be described as chronic Flexeril is associated with Acute conditions 

although I have suggested these please read carefully obviously i do not know what other meds your wife may be on or other pre existing conditions she may have

As such MPS is a grey area open to limited experimentation different things will help different people
Carbamazepine has had success in limiting or reversing pain in the trigemenal nerve around the cheekbone.
https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/trigeminal-neuralgia-tic-douloureux-a-to-z

It may or may not help along with effective muscle relaxant acupuncture etc.

I'm not a doctor so take any advice very carefully.

As for the relaxants you have been on for a decade 
There are many non addictive
Though some can cause gastric problems which is why they may be enteric coated to minimise such.
I would say that a decade is a very long time but again I know nothing about why you take these so again my opinion is one based on ignorance

I am grateful for your insight. In my own life and my own relaxants... I took something called Paraflex during 14 years (1972-1986) on almost a daily basis,,, and they worked great against the pain from Hernia in my lower back. They were not addictive at all.... But really hlepful. But were really happy after the operation in Sweden, when I could lose them for good....

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Some Valium or Zanax would probably do the trick.

 

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, bkk6060 said:

Some Valium or Zanax would probably do the trick.

 

But aren´t these really addictive stuff????? Aiming for completely different things than Myo Fascial syndrom...``

 

glegolo

Edited by glegolo

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@Sheryl is away until the 20th July. I have tagged this post so that she will see it on her return.

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30 minutes ago, blackcab said:

@Sheryl is away until the 20th July. I have tagged this post so that she will see it on her return.

Great doing, many thanks

 

glegolo

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Off topic posts have been removed.

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Biocalm is the standard muscle relaxer, here.  Doesn't do anything for pain, but does prevent spasms.  

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Posted (edited)

tetanus toxoid injections may greatly reduce pain stemming from damaged nerves

Edited by scammed

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And besides Biocalm, there is also Mydocalm...both are less than a small can of Chang, for a ten-strip.

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One bottle of sangsom...apply as needed.... 🙂

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I have frankly never known muscle relaxants to work much.

 

For myofascial pain the muscle relaxants recommended are Cyclobenzaprine  but there is no brand of it in Thailand.

 

Also suggested is tizanadine. This is available in Thailand under brand names Sirdalud, Tidar, Tiozan and Tonolyte. The last 3 are local brands, the first is an (expensive) import.

 

Myofascial pain syndrome is sort of a catch all diagnosis of exclusion, might be worth getting a second opinion to be sure it is not something else with a treatable cause. If MPS is confirmed, other treatments to ask about are:

  Dry Needling

 Injections of steroid or local anesthetic into trigger points

 Physical therapy

 

She will do best to be under the care of a pain specialist if MPS is confirmed, if this is Bangkok Hospital in Bangkok I suggest

https://www.bangkokhospital.com/en/doctor/dr-laksamee-chanvej

 

 

 

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