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Extension of stays based on medical certificate?

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16 hours ago, jackdd said:

An illness which doesn't allow you to travel.

 

They can pull your teeth if it hurts and then you can fly back home, i doubt anybody would see this as a reason why you can't travel.

Is there a distinction between a regular medical tourism visa, and an extension for medical purposes? As contrary to what you posted, the medical visa is commonly applied for before you enter the country. Quite obviously you're fit to fly in such conditions.

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22 minutes ago, jacob29 said:

Is there a distinction between a regular medical tourism visa, and an extension for medical purposes? As contrary to what you posted, the medical visa is commonly applied for before you enter the country. Quite obviously you're fit to fly in such conditions.

Afaik before covid you could get a medical visa for a planned treatment at a Thai hospital. But when the 90 days were over you were supposed to leave, unless you were unable to travel. (Thailand has some special rules for citizens of some middle eastern countries, i'm talking about other countries than these).

So i would say yes, the "visa" and the "extension" served different purposes. Just because a teeth treatment took 10 months, didn't mean you could stay in Thailand continuously for 10 months.

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Naturally, if you have a big doctor affirming that you have Krazyketchup Syndrome and cannot fly, you will definitely get the extension.

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You need a letter from a hospital stating you are completely unable to travel, and this would usually also mean you are an inpatrient in the hospital.  In my experience with several different Imm offices, they will also want photos of the patient in the hospital and expect this to show someone obviously very ill/incapacitated.

 

This reason for extension is taken very seriously and not issued lightly or on minor grounds. I haven't  known agents to be able to help with it.

 

The annoubncement is just making clear that this sort of extension is still possible. The normal rules for it have nto been in any way relaxed.

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On 7/31/2020 at 7:26 PM, Sheryl said:

You need a letter from a hospital stating you are completely unable to travel, and this would usually also mean you are an inpatrient in the hospital.  In my experience with several different Imm offices, they will also want photos of the patient in the hospital and expect this to show someone obviously very ill/incapacitated.

 

This reason for extension is taken very seriously and not issued lightly or on minor grounds. I haven't  known agents to be able to help with it.

 

The annoubncement is just making clear that this sort of extension is still possible. The normal rules for it have nto been in any way relaxed.

So, although someone could be suffering from diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity, which are common co-morbidities, and being treated in Thailand on an out-patient basis, immigration would not grant an extension unless the patient were also hospitalized, despite the fact that 40% of Covid-19 deaths involve diabetics?

 

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1 hour ago, PFV said:

So, although someone could be suffering from diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity, which are common co-morbidities, and being treated in Thailand on an out-patient basis, immigration would not grant an extension unless the patient were also hospitalized, despite the fact that 40% of Covid-19 deaths involve diabetics?

 

 

Correct.

 

An extension is granted only if the illness or injury is such that it makes travel impissible. An outpatient being treated for these sorts of things can certainly travel.

 

While it is not 100% required that you be hospitalized it is generally expected and if nto hospitalized the case would have to be made that travel is impossible, which is hard to do.

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30 minutes ago, Sheryl said:

An extension is granted only if the illness or injury is such that it makes travel impissible. An outpatient being treated for these sorts of things can certainly travel.

I have seen a few report of a medical treatment extension was granted due something as small as a cast on a person's foot and such. Some things do need continuing medical care without being hospital care by a hospital or doctor.

There are many cases where a person could not easily travel.

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2 hours ago, PFV said:

So, although someone could be suffering from diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity, which are common co-morbidities, and being treated in Thailand on an out-patient basis, immigration would not grant an extension unless the patient were also hospitalized, despite the fact that 40% of Covid-19 deaths involve diabetics?

 

What you'd need is a very vehemently worded doctor's certificate stating that due to your conditions and extremely high risk factor it was strongly recommended you did not travel. Even then your at the mercy of Immigration.

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Thank you very much Sheryl, ubonjoe, and Tanoshi.

This was a hypothetical question, in case someone could not apply for a different extension due to lack of funds or some other reason. I think it would be heartless for Thai Immigration to force folks with conditions such as the one I listed above on a risky flight home. But then again, we just need to look at US Immigration to see how callous officials can be (i.e. separating children from families.)

 

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