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Kenny202

Bread...flour to water ratio?

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Been making bread here for about 5 years and improved to a mix I use regularly. Basically 900 grams flour, salt, sugar, yeast and 3 cups (600ml) of warm water. The results are very good...on the dense side which I like, but I often wish I could get it a bit lighter.... but still it is good bread. Can be used for sandwiches etc. The mix always seems super stiff to me but if I add even a small amount of extra water the dough rises ok to a point but doesn't seem to support itself and is still useable but spreads rather than rises. I bake my bread on a tray rather than use loaf tins. My measuring cup is 200 ml, or 200 grams. I knead it in a mixer, let it rise....then punch down, divide to make 2 loaves, shape then do a further proving / second rise in a tepid oven until it has doubled (often tripled). Then I let her rip in a hot oven for 25 minutes.

 

The normal mix I make is fine with three cups of water and rises every time. No problems with any of that. I just feel my mix is slightly too dry but as I said above any increase in liquid the bread can't seem to support itself to rise high enough without flattening out. Maybe its because it is baked on a tray without the support of a bread tin? Maybe my 2 x loaves from this mix are too big?

 

Just wondering what ratio water to flour others use? What sort of consistency is your mix?

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35 minutes ago, Kenny202 said:

My measuring cup is 200 ml, or 200 grams. 

Is that for the flour or the water? 200ml or flour is a different WEIGHT to 200ml of water.

I think bakers use a percentage of flour to water by weight not volume.

Edited by stouricks

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I use 255gm of water, 20gm oil, 1/2 spoon sugar, 1/2 spoon salt, 4gm yeast.

Then make the weight up to 750gm with flour (approx 460gm).

 

Works every time in my machine.

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1 kilo flour to 640gs of water, everything weighed for accuracy. It makes me about 3 3/4 pound and 2 1/2 pound loaves. Hand kneed.

Screenshot_2020-04-08-10-10-25-425.jpeg

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2 minutes ago, stouricks said:

Both Britman & Vogie are quoting WEIGHTS for the ratio flour/water. Correct.

Correct. A cup of flour compacted will weigh more than a cup of loose flour.

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1 hour ago, stouricks said:

Is that for the flour or the water? 200ml or flour is a different WEIGHT to 200ml of water.

I think bakers use a percentage of flour to water by weight not volume.

Already mentioned 900 grams flour. 200ml of water, and according to my online converter

200ml of water = 200 grams in weight

 

I thought I would clarify that as I think an American cup is 250 ml / 8 oz

 

 

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1 hour ago, vogie said:

1 kilo flour to 640gs of water, everything weighed for accuracy. It makes me about 3 3/4 pound and 2 1/2 pound loaves. Hand kneed.

Screenshot_2020-04-08-10-10-25-425.jpeg

Thats about spot on the same as me. 2 big loaves. I knead mine in a mixer / dough hook though

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Looks like my flour / water ratio about the same as you guys. Mind you I have noticed only 50mm of of water either way makes a huge difference. So how would you guys describe consistency? Mine isn't dry or flaky at all, but quiet firm. Doesn't leave any residue in the mixer bowl.

 

Britman, if you are using a machine probably a lot more forgiving to a wetter mixer as the loaf is fully supported. When it rises it can only go one way, up :-). I bake mine of a flat tray. The shape of the loaf suits me better than a traditional block loaf. 

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12 minutes ago, Kenny202 said:

Mine isn't dry or flaky at all, but quiet firm

I get that alot especially in 7-11 

 

 

 

Edited by steven100

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  1 minute ago, Kenny202 said:

Mine isn't dry or flaky at all, but quiet firm

I get that alot   (sateeven nung roi)

 
 
you mean someone  firmly  tells you to be  quiet,  right ?     i can understand that
Edited by rumak
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8 minutes ago, Kenny202 said:

Looks like my flour / water ratio about the same as you guys. Mind you I have noticed only 50mm of of water either way makes a huge difference. So how would you guys describe consistency? Mine isn't dry or flaky at all, but quiet firm. Doesn't leave any residue in the mixer bowl.

 

Britman, if you are using a machine probably a lot more forgiving to a wetter mixer as the loaf is fully supported. When it rises it can only go one way, up :-). I bake mine of a flat tray. The shape of the loaf suits me better than a traditional block loaf. 

If weighed pretty much consistant all the time, here are the bread straight out of the oven, the 2 small (1/2 pound) at the front and the 3 large (3/4 pound)  at the rear.

 

 

IMG_20200525_170900.jpg

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8 minutes ago, vogie said:

If weighed pretty much consistant all the time, here are the bread straight out of the oven, the 2 small (1/2 pound) at the front and the 3 large (3/4 pound)  at the rear.

 

 

IMG_20200525_170900.jpg

Looks really good. You're using loaf tins right?

 

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Just now, Harry Fingerling said:

Five parts flour, three parts water, yeast & salt. That’s all you need for normal bread making. Bread flour or all purpose flour it works every time.

E858A81B-8C16-4196-8247-E5974277B477.jpeg

Oh mate. I made bread with all purpose flour for 2 years was ok but really the texture of cake. I don't doubt your mix but I am sure you will see a huge improvement with bread flour. Loaf looks awesome

 

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