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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Max69xl said:

Not when it comes to income based on retirement. You pay taxes where the pension was earned. UK must have a double taxation agreement with Thailand. Some countries in Europe have agreements with Thailand since the late 70's. 

You simply don't transfer the pension directly to a Thai bank account but to an account in your home country. And from this account you transfer what you need. Problem solved. Best then might be to use the 800.000 Baht method for your retirement extension... 

 

Edited by Oldie
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On 8/2/2020 at 8:59 PM, glegolo said:

For me as a swede, we have a double-tax-agreement in place with Thailand, saying that; where ever I earn my money, that is where I pay my taxes.... 

Dont you  as an english citizen, have such an agreement as well...??

 

glegolo

He's on a retirement visa which means he cannot work, therefore does not pay tax... [only VAT]

as a UK citizen if he resides outside the country he does not pay tax on pensions etc as long as he does not enter the UK for more then 60 days in any one year. Over 60 days he will have to pay taxes etc.

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54 minutes ago, hotchilli said:

He's on a retirement visa which means he cannot work, therefore does not pay tax... [only VAT]

as a UK citizen if he resides outside the country he does not pay tax on pensions etc as long as he does not enter the UK for more then 60 days in any one year. Over 60 days he will have to pay taxes etc.

OK sorry to hear that, Was just saying that many countries have for retirement/pensions e.g. was Sweden have. we have our pension taxated in our home-country because it was earned there..

 

glegolo

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Thailand is considered territorial  tax country.

you pay taxes only on what you earn in thailand.

you do not have to pay taxes nor even report on what you earned outside 

thailand.

terms and condition apply/

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Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, glegolo said:

OK sorry to hear that, Was just saying that many countries have for retirement/pensions e.g. was Sweden have. we have our pension taxated in our home-country because it was earned there..

 

glegolo

If you reside in England then yes your pension would be taxed according to your tax code, if you reside outside the UK it is tax exempt... you can enter England but if you exceed 60 days in any one year you will be liable to taxation.

In Thailand on a retirement visa you cannot work, therefore you do not have a work permit... so no taxation.

Edited by hotchilli

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15 minutes ago, glegolo said:

OK sorry to hear that, Was just saying that many countries have for retirement/pensions e.g. was Sweden have. we have our pension taxated in our home-country because it was earned there..

 

glegolo

UK is the same, pension sourced in the UK is taxed in the UK.

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I don't know if this is of any use to you or not. But I made enquiries at immigration some years ago regarding trying to obtain residency, They sent me packing without even looking at the reams of paperwork that i'd bought with me. You cannot even apply to obtain residency until you have at least three  one year visa extensions issued in the country. I'm also a commuter, i got my Thai TIN number. Tax Identification Number & was then told that i can't pay tax here until i spend 180 days or more in the country. Count yourself lucky if your not paying UK tax i doubt very much if anybody here in Thailand have the facilities, knowledge or want to track down expatriate individuals for unpaid tax.

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18 hours ago, MRToMRT said:

Described my situation (UK  & retired) and they told me I "could not have a tax ID" unless I intended to have earnings from within Thailand.

If one has a bank account in Thailand, and interest is paid, it is also usual with-holding tax is taken from that interest. Having a Thai Tax ID allows you to reclaim that..... 

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10 hours ago, hotchilli said:

He's on a retirement visa which means he cannot work, therefore does not pay tax... [only VAT]

as a UK citizen if he resides outside the country he does not pay tax on pensions etc as long as he does not enter the UK for more then 60 days in any one year. Over 60 days he will have to pay taxes etc.

You are still tax resident of Thailand if you stay here more than 183 days a year, retired or not. You can have numerous other income than from hard work salary only. You should read the DTA between GB and Thailand...😉

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11 hours ago, hotchilli said:

If you reside in England then yes your pension would be taxed according to your tax code, if you reside outside the UK it is tax exempt... you can enter England but if you exceed 60 days in any one year you will be liable to taxation.

In Thailand on a retirement visa you cannot work, therefore you do not have a work permit... so no taxation.

R u sure about 60 days? As a retiree not residing in the UK for tax purposes would he not use the TIES system to assess his maximum days in the UK in a particular tax year to be clear of tax residency. 

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Thank you everyone for your input, unfortunately more confused than before. As I see it seeking professional advice might be the best way to go. O n the other hand, head down say nothing and hope for the best.

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On 8/4/2020 at 3:51 PM, khunPer said:

You are still tax resident of Thailand if you stay here more than 183 days a year, retired or not. You can have numerous other income than from hard work salary only. You should read the DTA between GB and Thailand...😉

We are talking about the official pension you receive as a retiree, not any other income. That pension earned in your home country will never get taxed in Thailand due to double taxation agreements. You will pay taxes where the pension was earned. If GB has a crappy DTA with Thailand, even if I don't believe it concerns retirees with an earned pension in GB, then blame GB. I have read the DTA between my home country and Thailand, and it's 100% foolproof. I have lived here for years and I have officially migrated to Thailand. I pay my taxes back home and pay a much lower tax on my pension because of the migration, and it's not frozen like pensions from the UK if you don't have an official address anymore. I also have friends here from other countries which DTA's are equally foolproof. 

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1 hour ago, Max69xl said:

We are talking about the official pension you receive as a retiree, not any other income. That pension earned in your home country will never get taxed in Thailand due to double taxation agreements. You will pay taxes where the pension was earned. If GB has a crappy DTA with Thailand, even if I don't believe it concerns retirees with an earned pension in GB, then blame GB. I have read the DTA between my home country and Thailand, and it's 100% foolproof. I have lived here for years and I have officially migrated to Thailand. I pay my taxes back home and pay a much lower tax on my pension because of the migration, and it's not frozen like pensions from the UK if you don't have an official address anymore. I also have friends here from other countries which DTA's are equally foolproof. 

It's depending on the DTA between one's home country and Thailand, mine for example says that pension can be taxed in both states. But no matter what your DTA says, you are tax resident in the country you stay for more than 183 days (or 180 days), or where you have your permanent home, which should be mentioned in the beginning of a DTA; but a DTA might exclude retirement pension from being taxed in the other state, than the state where it's paid from.

 

Quote

 The DTA applies to persons who are residents of the Contracting States. In order to be classified as a Thai resident and be entitled to treaty benefits, a person must be one of the following:

- An individual who stays in Thailand for a period or periods exceeding in the aggregate 180 days in a tax year;

- A juristic person who is incorporated under the Civil and Commercial Code of Thailand.

Source: Thai government "Introduction to DTA".

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11 hours ago, Selwyn said:

Thank you everyone for your input, unfortunately more confused than before. As I see it seeking professional advice might be the best way to go. O n the other hand, head down say nothing and hope for the best.

Usually works well here!

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There is no double taxation. If you pay you tax at the source for your income then you don't pay tax here in Thailand,again i don't know what and who says but I transfer my rental incomes from USA every month for quiet some time now and my/wife tax advisor saying that I already pay taxes on my income at the source and there is proof of that (my yearly tax returns) so there can not be double taxation.

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