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Thai e-vehicle industry set for rapid growth

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Thai e-vehicle industry set for rapid growth

By THE NATION

 

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The Electric Vehicle Association of Thailand (EVAT) says the EV market in Thailand is the most advanced among Asean countries and will grow quickly during 2025 to 2030.

 

EVAT chairman Yossapong Laoonual said several of the association’s requirements for the EV industry have been adopted by the government. However, EV investment and production have moved slowly due to high operating costs.

 

EV technology will be cheaper from 2025 and become more accessible to normal people, he predicted.

 

He added that the EV industry in Thailand was more advanced than in Malaysia, Indonesia or Vietnam, since Thai producers were already up and running. Also, foreign auto companies were interested in investing in EV production in Thailand since it has long been a production base for normal cars.

 

The EVAT chairman suggested the government should use environmental policies to push EV use in the country, such as by promoting of Euro 5 and 6 emission standards, which are set to be adopted in Thailand over the next few years.

 

EVs will be cheaper than other Euro 6 cars in the next five years, while promoting the Euro 5 and 6 standards would boost EV sales in the future, he said.

 

The association is collaborating with other private agencies to promote EVs in Thailand. Next month, EVAT will join hands with Informa Markets to launch Asean Sustainable Energy Week 2020 from September 23 to 26, highlighted by the “International Electric Vehicle Technology Conference and Exhibition”.

 

Meanwhile, the national EV policy committee has approved plans to make Thailand a production base for EVs within five years. By 2030, 30 per cent of all vehicles produced in Thailand will be EV.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30392371

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-08-04
 
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My opinion says that the Hybrid market will take take off first, before we see complete conversion to vehicles running only on battery power.

Hybrids can travel further, batteries take long to charge up and their traveling range is very short too.

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Thailand has been a stronghold for automobile manufacturing for decades. It nicknamed itself "the Detroit of Asia," and the moniker stuck, with good reason. It's currently the 12th most industrious auto manufacturer in the world, and the largest in Southeast Asia. 

 

Japanese makers like Toyota and Mitsubishi have had operations in Thailand since the 1960s. GM, Ford, Mercedes and BMW all followed. 

Link

https://money.cnn.com/2018/07/10/news/world/thailand-auto-industry/index.html

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I see these as a great solution for people commuting in Bangkok. Trouble is, a lot of those people live in condos which makes charging them very difficult. 

 

The range is also limited so touring with them is problematic until the charging facilities are built.

 

So basically they are good for people who commute shortish distances and own their own house with a driveway (as long as they have a second car or don't wish to travel long distances). So a fairly limited market I'd say. I think hybrids will be the sensible choice for most for the next decade. 

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1 hour ago, Yinn said:

 

Thailand has been a stronghold for automobile manufacturing for decades. It nicknamed itself "the Detroit of Asia," and the moniker stuck, with good reason. It's currently the 12th most industrious auto manufacturer in the world, and the largest in Southeast Asia. 

 

Japanese makers like Toyota and Mitsubishi have had operations in Thailand since the 1960s. GM, Ford, Mercedes and BMW all followed. 

Link

https://money.cnn.com/2018/07/10/news/world/thailand-auto-industry/index.html

 

Yes. I am amazed at the number of international companies here. My wife supplies parts for almost every single factory here and sometimes out of boredom I travel to Chonburi with her to visit her customers. I see so many exporting opportunities here that I sometimes think going back to no jobs Canada will be a mistake. 

 

However, Canada used to be a car manufacturing hub decades ago until Americans packed their bags and left. Things can change overnight. 

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1 hour ago, canopy said:

500km range is considered to be the basic minimum standard for EV's going forward by some auto makers and there are EV's with much longer ranges. Range is thus a non-issue to most people. And charging an EV at home is easier than filling a car with gas. Just imagine if you had to bring your phone to a phone station to charge it, that would be a burden and total waste of time. But we don't, we charge them at home. That's more convenient as it will be with cars. And EV's need no oil changes, belt changes, nor the other maintenance like gas engines that take time and money to keep them going. Thus, it's great Thailand is not talking about hybrids. But it is disappointing they are also not talking about the problem that EV's in Thailand cost double or more what they cost in other countries.

 

The battery is heavy and always places low under the car. Soon we will see these EV cars boil off in flooded sois.

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6 minutes ago, JonnyF said:

I see these as a great solution for people commuting in Bangkok. Trouble is, a lot of those people live in condos which makes charging them very difficult. 

To me it makes sense there should be charging available wherever you park your car overnight. That means at home (whether house, apartment, or condo) and at hotels. Similar to places like long haul flights once upon a time didn't have phone charging, but they do now.

 

8 minutes ago, JonnyF said:

The range is also limited so touring with them is problematic until the charging facilities are built.

If you need long range then select an EV model with long range. Don't talk about a particular EV with short range and complain it doesn't go far enough.

 

9 minutes ago, JonnyF said:

I think hybrids will be the sensible choice for most for the next decade. 

To each his own. I wouldn't touch a hybrid with a 10 foot pole. Too many disadvantages.

 

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6 minutes ago, ExpatOilWorker said:

The battery is heavy and always places low under the car. Soon we will see these EV cars boil off in flooded sois.

EVs are already designed to handle flooding. In fact they keep running unlike engines that get the tailpipe blocked or sucks water in the engine destroying it. Search for clips of tesla's swimming for some fun.

 

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42 minutes ago, canopy said:

  

To me it makes sense there should be charging available wherever you park your car overnight. That means at home (whether house, apartment, or condo) and at hotels. Similar to places like long haul flights once upon a time didn't have phone charging, but they do now.

 

If you need long range then select an EV model with long range. Don't talk about a particular EV with short range and complain it doesn't go far enough.

 

To each his own. I wouldn't touch a hybrid with a 10 foot pole. Too many disadvantages.

 

Yes it makes sense to have charging where you park the car. But currently that isn't the case, so saying it makes sense to have it doesn't really help a potential buyer.

 

What is long range? Not that many will go from Bangkok to Phuket. Then how do you charge it when you get to Phuket? Hang an extension lead out of your 12th floor hotel window?

 

Hybrids work great. Nice smooth power, great range, no need to constantly charge them, battery prices reducing all the time. 

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