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Posted (edited)

My Wife sometimes brings home a bag of avocados from the market.

These are either rock hard or soft.

Most of the soft ones are turning black or brown inside while the hard ones are too hard to eat.

What should a fresh ripe avocado look like?

I never seem to get it right.

Edited by Malawi
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Posted (edited)

They are ripe when slightly soft to the touch.  But, may be difficult to find at the right stage.

Too soft are trash.

 

This can work for unripe avocados:

 

Avocados do not ripen on the tree; they ripen or “soften” after they have been harvested. To speed up the avocado ripening process we recommend placing unripe avocados in a brown paper bag with an apple or banana for two to three days until they are ripe. 

 

Edited by bkk6060
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Me too. It seems the window  of getting them just  right is really small.

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10 minutes ago, bkk6060 said:

They are ripe when slightly soft to the touch.  But, may be difficult to find at the right stage.

Too soft are trash.

 

This can work for unripe avocados:

 

Avocados do not ripen on the tree; they ripen or “soften” after they have been harvested. To speed up the avocado ripening process we recommend placing unripe avocados in a brown paper bag with an apple or banana for two to three days until they are ripe. 

 

Many will never ripen because they were not grown under optimal conditions. There is a certain level of fat content that an avocado must reach before it will ripen properly. If the growing conditions do not support reaching that level....it will stay hard forever (I mean the avocado that is)...and eventually rot before ever becoming edible.

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The big smooth skin "Thai/Asian avocado's are hit and miss at best, often with a brown tinge when ripened. Its better to get the pimply Haas type avocados which are more expensive but with a nice green interior when ripened.  

avoripemsn.jpg

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Not the easiest of things to keep.

Glad I am not the only ones to have problems.

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16 minutes ago, Malawi said:

Not the easiest of things to keep.

Glad I am not the only ones to have problems.

New trick of keeping opened avo from going bad is to put it in a shallow dish submerge the open face in a bit of water, will last a lot longer and fresher, true and tested... 

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17 minutes ago, Malawi said:

Not the easiest of things to keep.

Glad I am not the only ones to have problems.

The only way to get good avocados is to relocate to a country that imports or has available Mexican Haas varieties....the Mexican industry has enacted strict standards which has made their avocados the absolute best in the world. When I visit the US...I gorge myself on them...2 a day. Here it is largely a waste of money...at least 50% of the ones I have bought are throwaways

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Just got a couple of Peru imports from Tesco. 48 Baht each.

Will give them a try.

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7 hours ago, Pilotman said:

One of the nicest foods around, but in Thailand, they seem to be universally bloody awful.  We have stopped buying them. 

I have only ever had Avacados in Thailand and to be honest was very disappointed.

I now know better.

Why are they so bad?

Bad growing conditions or just a bad species.

Could they grow the Haas variety here?

Or is it just that they don't care.

Potatoes. Tomatoes are the same. Pretty bad.

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7 hours ago, Pilotman said:

One of the nicest foods around, but in Thailand, they seem to be universally bloody awful.  We have stopped buying them. 

Same here, I gave up on them and spend the extra $$ on the Haas variety. 

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On 8/5/2020 at 11:35 AM, Pilotman said:

One of the nicest foods around, but in Thailand, they seem to be universally bloody awful.  We have stopped buying them. 

I have only ever had Avacados in Thailand and to be honest was very disappointed.

I now know better.

Why are they so bad?

Bad growing conditions or just a bad species.

Could they grow the Haas variety here?

Or is it just that they don't care.

Potatoes. Tomatoes are the same. Pretty bad.

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The Haas from Peru were excellent.

Will never buy the Thai rubbish again.

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1 hour ago, Malawi said:

Could they grow the Haas variety here?

Found the same about avocados here, hit and miss.  Makro Pak Chong occasionally gets imported Haas which are fairly consistent and taste ok. Spending some of my younger years in San Diego USA grew to love them and haven't found anything comparable here.  Depending where you live her avocados can be grown. I set out a few type A and B avocado trees bought from a lady in Klang Dong, Pak Chong District in Nakhon Ratchasima.  She has a beautiful plot of avocados and sells the grafted trees. So far so good, growing well after a year, see what happens in a few years.  Attached is a document in Thai but the variety of trees she sells is in English. 

Avocado Muak Lek Sell Lady.pdf

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