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Request details on Thai language test for Permanent Residency

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For the permanent residency application, does anyone have details on what is required for the Thai language skills test? Are any sample questions available so an applicant can judge how best to prepare? 

 

I study Thai for fun/as a hobby, but I don't need to use it for my work so my vocabulary is more situational. I can read, write and speak conversational Thai.  Right now I'm reading and discussing books like the "Manee Mana" series for fun.  I'd be happy to redirect and double down on my efforts to something more useful for the permanent residency test, but haven't found guidance as to what sort of content this would be. Current events? The economy? Any thoughts appreciated.

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38 minutes ago, tomazbodner said:

This is now several years back but this is how my language skills test went:

We were given date and time to come for a test. On arriving, they would put is into a waiting room next to examination room. When one person completed the test, another entered the room who was sitting in front of the examination room, and then the next person was put in front of examination room. Generally it took 10-15 minutes per applicant for the test.

 

On entering the room, there was a small table with chair, in front of a long table with about 10-12 people sitting there, all in uniforms and adequately decorated. The man in the middle had most decorated uniform and seemed to be a big shot. He did the questioning. There was a lady on his side, that was nearly as decorated, and she would ask some questions from time to time as well. The rest listened and kept quiet. There was a lady on the side that was videotaping the whole thing. Camera pointed at the applicant.

 

Entering, you're asked to sit down, then a standard conversation starts... Tell us something about yourself... where do you come from, what do you do, where do you live, where do you work, ...

 

Then the conversation goes to any direction, like if you were having a conversation about yourself with a stranger.

 

In my case, the big shot has never heard of my country so the rest of conversation was all about my birth country, and although the lady on the side (probably having some other questions she wanted to cover) wanted to ask some more things but was made to keep quiet by the big shot. All in all my test was less than 10 minutes.

 

So this is not like 15 years ago, when the tests were question and answer. This is conversation.

 

I think it's not only about language skills, but also presentation skills. How you enter, how you greet them, the tone in which you speak, how you behave, etc. So don't forget to wai when you walk in, smile, be friendly with them, use proper (not spoken) Thai.

 

Good luck.

Thank you Tomazbodner, that is very helpful.  My Thai would be up to that type of conversation, if that is still what they are doing.

 

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To the OP sent a message to you a few hours ago.

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On 8/5/2020 at 10:39 AM, tomazbodner said:

This is now several years back but this is how my language skills test went:

We were given date and time to come for a test. On arriving, they would put is into a waiting room next to examination room. When one person completed the test, another entered the room who was sitting in front of the examination room, and then the next person was put in front of examination room. Generally it took 10-15 minutes per applicant for the test.

 

On entering the room, there was a small table with chair, in front of a long table with about 10-12 people sitting there, all in uniforms and adequately decorated. The man in the middle had most decorated uniform and seemed to be a big shot. He did the questioning. There was a lady on his side, that was nearly as decorated, and she would ask some questions from time to time as well. The rest listened and kept quiet. There was a lady on the side that was videotaping the whole thing. Camera pointed at the applicant.

 

Entering, you're asked to sit down, then a standard conversation starts... Tell us something about yourself... where do you come from, what do you do, where do you live, where do you work, ...

 

Then the conversation goes to any direction, like if you were having a conversation about yourself with a stranger.

 

In my case, the big shot has never heard of my country so the rest of conversation was all about my birth country, and although the lady on the side (probably having some other questions she wanted to cover) wanted to ask some more things but was made to keep quiet by the big shot. All in all my test was less than 10 minutes.

 

So this is not like 15 years ago, when the tests were question and answer. This is conversation.

 

I think it's not only about language skills, but also presentation skills. How you enter, how you greet them, the tone in which you speak, how you behave, etc. So don't forget to wai when you walk in, smile, be friendly with them, use proper (not spoken) Thai.

 

Good luck.

"use proper (not spoken) Thai."??

 

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2 hours ago, Max69xl said:

"use proper (not spoken) Thai."??

 

You know, sabda instead of athit, pharaya instead of mia...

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6 hours ago, Max69xl said:

"use proper (not spoken) Thai."??

Presumably, most important, use the correct pronouns when addressing the examiners, and avoid vulgar terms.

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