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Thailand’s ‘rice basket’ still short of water despite storm Sinlaku

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Thailand’s ‘rice basket’ still short of water despite storm Sinlaku

By The Nation

 

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Water management plans have been tightened after tropical storm Sinlaku failed to fill the four giant dams of the Chao Phraya River basin, threatening rice crops.

 

Somkiat Prajamwong, secretary-general of National Water Resources, said the storm swelled Sirikit Dam in Nan province, resulting in 250 million cubic metres of new water in the four Chao Phraya basin dams. The dam expects to receive another 337 million cubic metres from August 5-7, he added.

 

On August 4, the four dams contained a total 838 million cubic metres of water – 137 cubic metres million in Bhumibol Dam, 531 million in Sirikit Dam, 86 million in Kwai Noi Bumrung Dan Dam and 84 million Pasak Jolasid Dam.

 

Meanwhile, the Chao Phraya Dam is releasing 60 cubic metres per second for rice and other crops in the river basin. Of the expected annual 3,250 million cubic metres of water, 75 per cent has already been used, leaving only 815 million cubic metres for the rice crop in 2020 (as of July 29.) Rice is being grown on 3.54 million rai in the basin, or 43.8 per cent of planned 8.10 million rai.

 

With levels in the four dams still lower than in 2019, the National Water Command Centre has tasked responsible agencies with strictly controlling water according to demand.

 

The centre is seeking to maximise Chao Phraya basin water resources via the irrigation network and by planning for monsoon rains in August and September.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30392501

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-08-06
 

 

Meanwhile the centre is closely monitoring floods left by storm Sinlaku that have hit 13 northern provinces and about 20,000 households.

 

 

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I'm sad for the rice farmers, but very happy that we have some competent people in charge of the dams and reservoirs.

We don't want the same disaster as in 2011 when Yingluck was trying to help the farmers with enough water, and ended up flooding all of Central Thailand. At least she got to show of her expensive Burberry rubber boots.

Bangkok remembers.......

 

Yingluck_Burberry.jpg

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How do you say "water retention" in Thai?  

4 hours ago, webfact said:

With levels in the four dams still lower than in 2019, the National Water Command Centre has tasked responsible agencies with strictly controlling water according to demand.

Control is all they know.   Ideas are too much like hard work. 

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1 hour ago, herfiehandbag said:

That is one of the most pathetic "but, but, Thaksin" posts I think I have ever seen!

I disagree i still remember the lies and misinformation that led to many in my gated village to be flooded. Had they known they had putten their cars somewhere else. Till this day the people remember it and get a bit worried when there is talk about flooding.

 

So now they keeping a bit more of a margin that is a good thing. I hope that they can manage it better but keep flooding to a minimum. It should always be aimed at reducing flooding before agriculture. 

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5 hours ago, webfact said:

Water management plans have been tightened after tropical storm Sinlaku failed to fill the four giant dams of the Chao Phraya River basin, threatening rice crops.

Should read: "water mis-management plans" !

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Call dinosaur Chavalit Yongchaiyuth - he was the man with the "Green Isan" programme 30+ years ago which promised riches. Well, he was right, except that wealth did not go to the farmers but elsewhere ...... 

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2 hours ago, robblok said:

So now they keeping a bit more of a margin that is a good thing.

Are they, appears to me the dams are close to being empty, but the article states otherwise so must be true 🙂 

More media BS to feed the masses :thumbsup:

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9 hours ago, rasmus5150 said:

I'm sad for the rice farmers, but very happy that we have some competent people in charge of the dams and reservoirs.

We don't want the same disaster as in 2011 when Yingluck was trying to help the farmers with enough water, and ended up flooding all of Central Thailand. At least she got to show of her expensive Burberry rubber boots.

Bangkok remembers.......

 

Yingluck_Burberry.jpg

As I remember it, 2011 rainy season started up very slow and was considered a drought year. Water was kept at high lever to be used throughout the dry season. Then there was a change of the rain pattern and it started raining heavily, but it was assumed the strong rain won't last long, so still they haven't open the water gates. By the time they realized the rain won't stop very soon, the dams were already 90% full and they had to release water fast, and that caused the flooding of Bangkok and central Thailand

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3 hours ago, LukKrueng said:

As I remember it, 2011 rainy season started up very slow and was considered a drought year. Water was kept at high lever to be used throughout the dry season. Then there was a change of the rain pattern and it started raining heavily, but it was assumed the strong rain won't last long, so still they haven't open the water gates. By the time they realized the rain won't stop very soon, the dams were already 90% full and they had to release water fast, and that caused the flooding of Bangkok and central Thailand

You remember correctly. Total mismanagement.

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5 hours ago, LukKrueng said:

As I remember it, 2011 rainy season started up very slow and was considered a drought year. Water was kept at high lever to be used throughout the dry season. Then there was a change of the rain pattern and it started raining heavily, but it was assumed the strong rain won't last long, so still they haven't open the water gates. By the time they realized the rain won't stop very soon, the dams were already 90% full and they had to release water fast, and that caused the flooding of Bangkok and central Thailand

Fairly typical in Thailand. Slow, slow reactions and no planning, resulting in kneejerks and fails. 

 

PPPPPP. Proper Planning Prevents <deleted> Poor Performance.

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Posted (edited)

Water management  is such an art form especially in a country that can receive so much rain in short periods. 

There isn't enough structures to control Thailand  and so much low lying land.  Without flooding the land will need manage nutrients.    With acceleration of climate change all past data is  not so helpful.   

 

 I should add I don't feel too much sympathy for people who live in a flood plain

Edited by Elkski

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19 hours ago, LukKrueng said:

As I remember it, 2011 rainy season started up very slow and was considered a drought year. Water was kept at high lever to be used throughout the dry season. Then there was a change of the rain pattern and it started raining heavily, but it was assumed the strong rain won't last long, so still they haven't open the water gates. By the time they realized the rain won't stop very soon, the dams were already 90% full and they had to release water fast, and that caused the flooding of Bangkok and central Thailand

Plus there was a minister that did not want to open the gates as he wanted to safe the rice. It had a connection with the rice pledging too. He left the water in longer as i wanted to see the money from the rice scheme first. So there was some mismanagement on purpose too.

 

But its not what i hated about the whole of 2011 it was the fact that they could see the flooding happening with their satelites and small planes but kept saying BKK ans surroundings would not flood. So the people int he village here kept their cars in. You can imagine the disaster for the people when the water came and destroyed our houses and cars (i was smart enough to have brought the car out just in case).  But the problem was more that they knew about the flooding and the water mass and did not inform people until they could no longer. Wit some real info a lot of damage would have been prevented. That is what i blame them for most.

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