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Knowledge of language and life in the UK

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On page 5 of the document I read it as those who are exempt from taking the Life in the UK test include..

 

..bereaved spouses, civil partners, unmarried partners or same-sex partners of people present and settled in the UK

 

Have I read this correctly? Will a married spouse need to do the life in UK test to obtain ILR?

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Posted (edited)
32 minutes ago, NightSky said:

On page 5 of the document I read it as those who are exempt from taking the Life in the UK test include..

 

..bereaved spouses, civil partners, unmarried partners or same-sex partners of people present and settled in the UK

 

Have I read this correctly? Will a married spouse need to do the life in UK test to obtain ILR?

 

I would guess that bereaved partners of all kinds are the people being exempted, not just bereaved spouses.

 

And that there are no exemptions purely for being "civil partners, unmarried partners or same-sex partners".

 

And that on that basis "un-bereaved" partners of all kinds, including married spouses, are required to have KoLL.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Enoon

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10 minutes ago, 7by7 said:

of a person present and settled in the UK unless that person has died

Anyone explain please?

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3 minutes ago, stouricks said:

Anyone explain please?

 

Mrs. X marries a British citizen, Mr. X, and applies for and is granted a settlement visa to live with him in the UK.

 

If Mr. X dies before she has ILR then she can apply for ILR as a bereaved spouse and is exempt from KoLL.

 

But if Mr. X is still alive when she applies for ILR she will need to satisfy KoLL.

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, 7by7 said:

 

Mrs. X marries a British citizen, Mr. X, and applies for and is granted a settlement visa to live with him in the UK.

 

If Mr. X dies before she has ILR then she can apply for ILR as a bereaved spouse and is exempt from KoLL.

 

But if Mr. X is still alive when she applies for ILR she will need to satisfy KoLL.

So Mrs X can go to UK knowing F all about the country if her husband died between applying and being granted ILR, which is so confusing, how would a non-English person know what 'Indefinite Leave to Remain' means if I do not know.

Edited by stouricks

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1 hour ago, Enoon said:

 

I would guess that bereaved partners of all kinds are the people being exempted, not just bereaved spouses.

 

And that there are no exemptions purely for being "civil partners, unmarried partners or same-sex partners".

 

And that on that basis "un-bereaved" partners of all kinds, including married spouses, are required to have KoLL.

 

 

 

 

Yes I get it now thanks.. lol

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19 minutes ago, stouricks said:

So Mrs X can go to UK knowing F all about the country if her husband died between applying and being granted ILR, which is so confusing, how would a non-English person know what 'Indefinite Leave to Remain' means if I do not know.

 

I am sure that all British/foreign couples have researched the procedure and requirements from initial visa through Further Leave to Remain to Indefinite Leave to Remain and often onto naturalisation before embarking on the first steps down that 5 year plus road.

 

Like I did with my wife, I would suggest that her husband has told her something about this country before they married and she moved here. She would learn more once here; unless her husband treated her like a slave and kept her locked up in the home with no access to the outside world!

 

Remember, too, that she would have needed to satisfy the language requirement to obtain her initial visa and then the harder one for her Further Leave to Remain after 30 months so would have some knowledge of English.

 

It is, though, entirely possible that she would not know that she could apply for ILR were her husband to die. She may learn, from his family perhaps finding out for her. I'm sure most in that situation would want to find out what they could do; especially if they had children.

 

There are plenty of places to seek such advice; the CAB, forums such as this for example.

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20 minutes ago, 7by7 said:

forums such as this for example.

555!

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14 minutes ago, stouricks said:
35 minutes ago, 7by7 said:

forums such as this for example.

555!

 What is your problem?

 

I have answered all your questions as simply and thoroughly as I can. 

 

Do you still not understand; or has your whole contribution to this topic been nothing more than a pathetic wind up?

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We are currently applying for the first spouse visa. I didn't realise that my wife would need to do the Life in the Uk test to complete the 5 year route to ILR. I thought that was only for citizenship application.

 

This might be a problem for my wife as she is not confident at all doing tests. She did pass the English test A1 but that life in UK test is daunting.

 

If we do manage to get to the UK I intend to suggest to my wife on studying for B1 and Life in Uk test right away, what is the best path for my wife to learn these tests? (Is it something called an ESOL course?)

 

And is there an option not to have to do the life in UK test without me dying and my wife being a widow?

 

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10 minutes ago, NightSky said:

And is there an option not to have to do the life in UK test without me dying and my wife being a widow?

Erm, no.  

 

11 minutes ago, NightSky said:

If we do manage to get to the UK I intend to suggest to my wife on studying for B1 and Life in Uk test right away, what is the best path for my wife to learn these tests? (Is it something called an ESOL course?)

Good idea as I'm sure both of you have no desire to impede the path to British citizenship.

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1 hour ago, torturedsole said:

Erm, no.  

 

Good idea as I'm sure both of you have no desire to impede the path to British citizenship.

I think she would be content with ILR although it seems citizenship requirement is almost identical to the ILR requirement except for requiring the ILR for some time prior to citizenship and the amount of absent days away from the UK, so I see what you mean about not delaying things.

 

We are still at spouse application stage right now, gathering the required portfolio of documents -- it looks like a long haul ahead then!

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36 minutes ago, NightSky said:

I think she would be content with ILR although it seems citizenship requirement is almost identical to the ILR requirement except for requiring the ILR for some time prior to citizenship and the amount of absent days away from the UK, so I see what you mean about not delaying things.

Your wife might be content with ILR and a lot of Thais are, but it's a precarious state with many restrictions.  All restrictions are lifted on becoming a British citizen.  

 

Yes, once your wife has achieved ILR then the path to citizenship is nothing more than form filling and stumping up the cash.  

 

Have a plan for once your wife gets here and set the bar high then go for it.  I understand your wife isn't confident with exams but I've seen many Thai ladies equally as nervous and pass all the tests, sometimes eventually.  

 

 

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