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Hal65

Outlet keeps bricking electronics

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1. Yesterday I woke up to find my wireless earphones were dead. Further charging did nothing.

 

2. Today I found my phone, charger plugged into the same outlet, has also been bricked.

 

3. I posted here last month about how my apartment electric bill surged by 1,400 last mont (average electric bill was 1,400 baht, last month 2,800 baht with no change in use).

 

I don't know if that 3rd point connects to the first two. But I wanted to include it as it might. Does anyone know what this could mean?

 

Can an outlet be "over-currented" and push out more power than it's supposed to? That would explain the destroyed electronics and high bill together. But again, I'm not sure if it's that simple.

 

 

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Ask the landlord to get his "man" with a meter to verify the voltage at your outlets. It should be 220V +-10% or so.

 

Anything over 240V could cause issues with low-cost electronics.

 

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Posted (edited)

OP, it sounds more like a faulty plug-pack transformers or outlet, rather than faulty devices.

Do the devices charge or power up when plugged into a different plug pack or outlet.

 

A surge etc would effect all outlets, not just one, and in most cases just damage the plug-pack. Most of the time, a device downstream from a transformer has a level of protection as the transformer self destructs.

 

Bricked, although not a technical term, usually refers to a firmware/software problem (device powers on but wont load its operating system). 

 

You probably need to follow a process of elimination, start with a known good outlet, use a know good plug-pack etc.

Edited by Peterw42
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19 hours ago, Hal65 said:

Can an outlet be "over-currented" and push out more power than it's supposed to? That would explain the destroyed electronics and high bill together. But again, I'm not sure if it's that simple.

sure it can, and that could kill all appliances

 

the 10+ million baht home I live in, has get me shocked on some occasions touching my computer, the oven, etc...

 

because of a cheap ass electrical wannabe that wired all the houses here

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An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is a good idea to protect expensive electronics. It’s essentially a battery that continues to provide power for a few minutes when mains power fails, and also provides a constant voltage and protects from power surges. I have  my OLED TV and computer plugged into a UPS. They’re not all that expensive.

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If it is just one outlet, then there is the possibility of a bad connection in the outlet. This can cause the connections to get hot when used and pass the heat on to the device.

A phone charger has a small rectifying circuit and if one of the components got too hot it could very easily fail.

Not sure what you mean about your wireless earphones, how were they connected to the outlet, on charge?

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5 minutes ago, Bender Rodriguez said:

sure it can, and that could kill all appliances

 

No such thing as "over currented"

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19 hours ago, RichCor said:

 

snip

 

If the consumer unit or individual outlet is wired faulty, that might explain issues ...but bricking devices usually isn't one of them.

 

Over-voltage an Under-voltage is the usual culprit with bricked electronics.  Suggest you by a consumer-friendly plug-in test device/meter to see what your power is doing.   

hi  what kind of plugin test device do you rec ?  also i have a desktop pc that gives me a mild shock when i touch bare metal   ground wire system probably   also  the OP can get a ups .. 

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1 hour ago, sandyf said:

No such thing as "over currented"

TIT  anything can and will happen ..  i have read numerous posts from people that have monitored and recorded the voltage coming into the house  .. lets change the terminoligy  electric voltage  surges

 

one house i rented .. brand new .. when it stormed outside it would blow the circuit breakers in house ...  .. no other info  .. good luck on yours 

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I=V/R.  If there was no such thing as over current, there would be no need for circuit breakers.  If you are having voltage spikes you need a surge protector.  Check your outlet to see if the neutral wire is not really a ground/earth wire.  Neutral to ground/earth should be 0.

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Normally a bad electrical surge would only harm the charger, not the device being charged. Are there signs of damage (scorch marks, deformed plastic) on either the chargers or devices? Do they operate when plugged into other outlets? Will the devices start charging if you use a different charger and a different outlet?

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3 hours ago, ifmu said:
22 hours ago, RichCor said:

Suggest you by a consumer-friendly plug-in test device/meter to see what your power is doing.

hi  what kind of plugin test device do you rec ?  [...]

While someone who's knowledgeable in the ways of using a digital multimeter can manually perform the tests, sticking metal probs into sockets isn't everyone's cup of tea. A more consumer-friendly set of devices might help.

 

200-300 thb AC Socket Tester:  Lazada Digital Display Socket Detector

 

 

6baa4cc782188f5b20b66e45ca766f27.jpg_1200x1200q80.jpg  

 

* Please check the product description carefully to verify the socket tester voltage range (220-250v) and a 3-pin plug type is recommended for full earth-ground test usability

 

 

 

4 hours ago, ifmu said:

also i have a desktop pc that gives me a mild shock when i touch bare metal   ground wire system probably

Yes, mild shocks or tingles are a good indication your PC or other electrical appliance's 3-pin electrical socket isn't properly grounded. 

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5 hours ago, Bender Rodriguez said:

sure it can, and that could kill all appliances

 

the 10+ million baht home I live in, has get me shocked on some occasions touching my computer, the oven, etc...

 

because of a cheap ass electrical wannabe that wired all the houses here

The current is depending on the circuit breaker. If you have a 10A breaker it should trip if there's a spike in current. That's the whole purpose with an automatic circuit breaker or the old fashioned ceramic fuse. If you get "shocked" by touching your microwave it's possibly because it's not connected to earth. You can buy microwaves or even fridges here with a 2 pin plug, which is totally forbidden in the western world if the appliance has a metal cover. If you buy a rice cooker from Sharp it has a 2 pin plug, but a rice cooker from let's say Electrolux always has a 3 pin US plug. I had a very good Samsung combination microwave with metal cover. It had a 2 pin plug. Go figure. 

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