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LawrenceN

Storks displacing egrets?

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Sorry if this belongs in another forum. I didn't see one for bird-watching.

 

Anyway, I'm a casual birder. I'm a frequent cyclist. I have noticed many more open-billed storks in the last year or two, and a lot fewer egrets. Is this a well-documented phenomenon? Do you more serious birdwatchers know about this? I still see a few egrets out there on my morning bike rides, but not in every field like there were before the storks moved in in big numbers a couple of years ago. 

 

Well-informed comments welcome. 

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Yes see many more storks this year, Mae Rim.

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Same in San Kamphaeng.  Storks used to stay for a short time & in small numbers.  Def a lot more & here seemingly permanently.

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I've been seeing many more storks in the Hnagdong area than usual and they seem to be staying around.

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Yep. Nong Hoi -Saraphi to further south is for sure. They seem to follow rice fields. 

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Anyone know what kind of bird makes a next like this:

1021922957_Birdnest.jpg.955d6a03ae357174785dad1fff58505a.jpg

 

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Weaver bird?

 

 

 

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30 minutes ago, Madgee said:

Weaver bird?

 

 

 

Yes, that's it, thanks.

 

I've never seen them before until this year. These are near a friend's house in the Lamphun area. Been visiting him for years and this is the first year they have built their nests in this tree or anywhere close by (that I'm aware of).

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I'd say they are weaver bird nests too as I saw them a lot in South Africa but less so over here.

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I'm the OP. Yes, we all know there are more storks. I said so in the OP. The question is, "Are storks displacing egrets?" I was hoping to hear from a KNOWLEDGEABLE, serious birdwatcher, maybe a full-fledged (pun intended) ornithologist. No one even mentioned seeing fewer egrets, so that maybe we could see a trend or identify a causation. 

 

A few years back, on a morning bike ride, I stopped to ask a farmer if he had noticed fewer storks. It was a year in which storks were scarce. He said yes, farmers were scaring them off because storks stomp the seedling rice plants. So, you see, I'm wondering whether this is a known natural cycle, or if Thai farmers have been educated about the benefits of storks. Maybe storks attack egrets' nests and eat their eggs. See, I can speculate and theorize with the best of you, but as I said in the OP, I would appreciate knowledgeable answers or observed behavior. 

 

This post is not about weaver birds. Start your own post if you want to post photos of diverse species and their nesting habits. Apologies for getting so cranky. Apparently, TV is the place to go for information you already know, or never asked.

 

Off to google, ya w***kers. 

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....there must be more babies arriving in Chiang Mai...

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8 hours ago, dingdongrb said:

Anyone know what kind of bird makes a next like this:

1021922957_Birdnest.jpg.955d6a03ae357174785dad1fff58505a.jpg

 

Oh yes. We have 2 large trees near us that are literally bird apartment complexes just like this. 

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18 minutes ago, LawrenceN said:

I'm the OP. Yes, we all know there are more storks. I said so in the OP. The question is, "Are storks displacing egrets?" I was hoping to hear from a KNOWLEDGEABLE, serious birdwatcher, maybe a full-fledged (pun intended) ornithologist. No one even mentioned seeing fewer egrets, so that maybe we could see a trend or identify a causation. 

 

A few years back, on a morning bike ride, I stopped to ask a farmer if he had noticed fewer storks. It was a year in which storks were scarce. He said yes, farmers were scaring them off because storks stomp the seedling rice plants. So, you see, I'm wondering whether this is a known natural cycle, or if Thai farmers have been educated about the benefits of storks. Maybe storks attack egrets' nests and eat their eggs. See, I can speculate and theorize with the best of you, but as I said in the OP, I would appreciate knowledgeable answers or observed behavior. 

 

This post is not about weaver birds. Start your own post if you want to post photos of diverse species and their nesting habits. Apologies for getting so cranky. Apparently, TV is the place to go for information you already know, or never asked.

 

Off to google, ya w***kers. 

My opinion is there are the same amount of egrets still out and about but the storks have recently just come in with bigger numbers making the population of egrets look tiny. Your question is a good observation, as I will not see egrets and storks hanging about in the same field. Not conducive for one another is what I gather.

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13 minutes ago, holy cow cm said:

My opinion is there are the same amount of egrets still out and about but the storks have recently just come in with bigger numbers making the population of egrets look tiny. Your question is a good observation, as I will not see egrets and storks hanging about in the same field. Not conducive for one another is what I gather.

Thanks for that. Storks are bigger, so they can push the egrets out as they compete for the same habitat. 

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