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Legal Curveball From Thailand To the UK


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This is a strange one, did some searching, but it seems not many people have a family like mine!

 

Many years ago when I was living in the UK, my Dad and me built a large garage onto our home. Just the two of us, no help at all from my brother. Not long after the garage was built, I worked away from home overseas. I had some things that had some value to me that were eventually removed from my old room and into a small corner of the garage (no one asked me - they just moved them) But later, my brother decided he wanted to move a car in there and a lathe and other tooling that took up 90% of the space.

 

Later on, when I visited my Mother I found that he had taken over the entire garage and disposed of my things by basically throwing them in the trash. This was not junk, I am talking about some state of the art (at its time) HiFi, Linn Sondek turntable, Monitor Audio speakers, a 1968 Vox Continental Organ, a Dual keyboard Organ, Violin, and many books that I had kept for years. The monetary value was way over 15,000 GBP, all just thrown in the trash.

 

Since then, my Mother passed away and the house and contents are up for sale.

 

Does anyone know what the UK Law would require to be able to at least get partial repayment for these items? It really guts me that they were able to just throw everything out without even bothering to tell me, I could have sold them or shipped them over here, they were things that had sentimental value.

 

Like I say, not much online to cover this as most people seem to have had the decency to let the owner know before chucking them in a skip! 

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7 minutes ago, Formaleins said:

it seems not many people have a family like mine!

A long time ago I did forensic computer discovery and technical support for a few US law firms, your family behavior is more the norm than you'd want to believe.  

 

My guess is as the items were not owned by your parents they would not be a part of their estate so no compensation would be due there. This is more a case of property mismanagement (lacking binding verbal or written agreement, and the principals involved now deceased). While you could sue directly, after so many years and you saying the items were things that had sentimental value it's unlikely any solicitor would take such a case.

 

Another option, just as unlikely, would be to have a heart-to-heart talk with the brother.

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12 minutes ago, RichCor said:

A long time ago I did forensic computer discovery and technical support for a few US law firms, your family behavior is more the norm than you'd want to believe.  

 

My guess is as the items were not owned by your parents they would not be a part of their estate so no compensation would be due there. This is more a case of property mismanagement (lacking binding verbal or written agreement, and the principals involved now deceased). While you could sue directly, after so many years and you saying the items were things that had sentimental value it's unlikely any solicitor would take such a case.

 

Another option, just as unlikely, would be to have a heart-to-heart talk with the brother.

Thanks, but a heart to heart is not on the cards when Greed is their motivation. There has been a deliberate ploy to screw me out of as much as possible from day one.
Should have kept the old inheritance laws the UK had where the eldest son got everything. Ha ha!

 

Not looking to make money, just trying to get back what was basically stolen. I could not bring them over here, but would have liked to have had the opportunity to sell them to someone that would have used them or appreciated them.
 

Some of the books i had were from when I was 4 years old, they were presented for certain achievements at school, I am nearly 60 now so you may understand the sentimental stuff.

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You've got no chance of getting anything back. Zero.

 

Had you filed a report with the police as soon as you found out that your possessions had been destroyed, then you might have a leg to stand on.    

 

Your best option is to forget about it and move on with your life. 

 

By the way, because you spent 15k on these items doesn't mean they are worth that much, everything could be replaced for about £1k or less so get a grip.

 

If someone in the UK is in possession of your things, which you allowed and agreed to either directly or passively, and something happens to them then it's a civil matter. This is so petty that I would be very surprised if a lawyer would be willing to help you, even then they're gonna want £500 up front and won't win. It's like saying I gave my packet of cigarettes to a friend at a party ten years ago, and he never gave them back, now I want £8.

Edited by SteveK
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I take it you will benefit from the sale of the house, when this is done, try to draw a line under the bad feeling, move on with your life, create a few more recent pleasant memories

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22 minutes ago, Formaleins said:

There has been a deliberate ploy to screw me out of as much as possible from day one.

Seems there is more to this than them just disposing of your junk.

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Let it go.

Not quite the same situation but I, too, was taken aback by the psychotic behavior of my sisters in the period running up to the death of my mother earlier this year. I knew that they were not particularly nice people but was genuinely surprised by just how selfish, toxic, and mercenary their behavior was. It caused me a great deal of pain, especially as I had spent a huge amount of time and effort caring for her and my father, with no help or acknowledgement from them.

Ultimately, I had to decide that I will never again engage with them on any level, not even in the unlikely event of some future attempt by them to apologize. They are simply bad people and I am under no obligation to have them in my life. I am on good terms with my brother, and that will be the extent of my connection with the family once my father dies.

 

Edited by Poet
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In my opinion, you're carrying a big heavy back pack full of bitterness and resentment toward your brother. 

Warrented or not, it won't do your wellbeing any good at all. 

Just let it go and move on and try to be happy. 

 

Console yourself with the fact that all that stuff that you left in the garage, you have done without it for all those years, so you don't really need it, and if you're ever in a similar position in future, just sell everything before you leave. 

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I do empathise having had a similar fate with much valued sentimental items prized over a lifetime. However, for my own wellbeing and peace of mind, it was best to move on and even forgive. Be in your present. The past is just a memory many parts of which are best forgotten.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The short answer is, yes there are grounds on which you can sue and yes there grounds on which he can defend, but for the amount of money involved it's not worth pursuing.

 

Remember that as plaintiff you'd bear the burden of establishing the facts to support your claim. If your brother simply denies touching your stuff, how are you going to prove otherwise?

 

Something like this has happened to so many of us on passing of a parent, and it especially happens when you're overseas and not there. Really, no choice but to move on. Sorry.

 

 

 

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