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Does anyone have kefir grains?


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Thanks for the heads-up Sheryl, but I've found a shop just down the road that has fresh grains for sale so I'll head down there tomorrow.

They are one of the new cure all, magic, super food, extending life things....that are, as usual, hard to get and expensive...and actually have little if any benefit to life..

I had to google it too. Similar to yoghurt, fermented with more/different microorganisms, may be more beneficial to gut health; apparently more sour than yoghurt, so people might just prefer the taste

1 hour ago, beau thai said:

try aden health store - via google

Thanks, I've sent them a message.  They sell several kinds of bottled kefir, so fingers crossed.

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Do you know that  you can freeze them? That's what I did last year with some as a precaution against them dying. 

 

Quite simple. You can google how to do it. So next time you have some and they start to grow, freeze the extra.

Mine were in the freezer for over a year, and reactivated once I put them in some milk.

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1 hour ago, phetphet said:

Do you know that  you can freeze them? That's what I did last year with some as a precaution against them dying. 

 

Quite simple. You can google how to do it. So next time you have some and they start to grow, freeze the extra.

Mine were in the freezer for over a year, and reactivated once I put them in some milk.

Thanks, that's what I was aiming to do because I'm obsessive about backups (you want to see my scoby hotel), but I didn't get far enough to make myself a backup.  I bought some dehydrated ones and after a few days of settling them in they were producing nice kefir, 2 cups every day which is exactly what I wanted.  Over 6 weeks, the grains didn't seem to grow at all, so last week I put them into a muslim baggie in case I was missing the tiny new ones (very unlikely as I was using a professional grade fine sieve) and when I opened up the baggie today it looked pretty empty.  I scraped out all of the kefir into a new jar with milk, and I'm hoping that there will be something there tomorrow, but I've found a shop selling them, Aden Health Store recommended by Beau Thai.  I sent them a message and they replied that they sell them and they are fresh, not dehydrated, so I'll be heading to them in the next couple of days to buy some.  And as soon as I have enough spare, I'll freeze some and dehydrate some so I've got backup.

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1 hour ago, Sheryl said:

PM @tropo

Thanks for the heads-up Sheryl, but I've found a shop just down the road that has fresh grains for sale so I'll head down there tomorrow.

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5 hours ago, uncleP said:

I'm  in the same boat

I'll let you know how much they are when I get them from Aden Health Store.  Or you can wait a few weeks and I'll have spare ones (I hope).

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I have just been on this site to try and find out what KEFIR is
https://www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/milk-kefir/how-to-find-milk-kefir-grains/

It said the following;

 

WHAT ARE MILK KEFIR GRAINS & WHERE DO THEY COME FROM?
Milk kefir grains are a mother culture made up of polysaccharides, the primary of which is kefiran[1]. Within this matrix of polysaccharides exists both bacteria and yeasts which exist in symbiosis both with each other and the milk it cultures and feeds from. These grains have a gelatinous feel to them and appear in a sort of miniature floret shape, much like cauliflower.

The bacteria and yeast composition of milk kefir grains tend to vary according to their origin as well as their culturing environment. In other words, where the grains came from and where they are currently being used can impact the makeup of the microorganisms existing in the milk kefir grains.


I am none the wiser having read the above,

In plain English can anyone explain what it does or doesn't do and why should anyone care?
 

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7 minutes ago, fangless said:

I have just been on this site to try and find out what KEFIR is
https://www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/milk-kefir/how-to-find-milk-kefir-grains/

It said the following;

 

WHAT ARE MILK KEFIR GRAINS & WHERE DO THEY COME FROM?
Milk kefir grains are a mother culture made up of polysaccharides, the primary of which is kefiran[1]. Within this matrix of polysaccharides exists both bacteria and yeasts which exist in symbiosis both with each other and the milk it cultures and feeds from. These grains have a gelatinous feel to them and appear in a sort of miniature floret shape, much like cauliflower.

The bacteria and yeast composition of milk kefir grains tend to vary according to their origin as well as their culturing environment. In other words, where the grains came from and where they are currently being used can impact the makeup of the microorganisms existing in the milk kefir grains.


I am none the wiser having read the above,

In plain English can anyone explain what it does or doesn't do and why should anyone care?
 

They are one of the new cure all, magic, super food, extending life things....that are, as usual, hard to get and expensive...and actually have little if any benefit to life..

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7 minutes ago, fangless said:

In plain English can anyone explain what it does or doesn't do and why should anyone care?

I had to google it too. Similar to yoghurt, fermented with more/different microorganisms, may be more beneficial to gut health; apparently more sour than yoghurt, so people might just prefer the taste.

 

OP: You can't just buy ready-made kefir & use it as a starter, like yoghurt?

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9 hours ago, jak2002003 said:

They are one of the new cure all, magic, super food, extending life things....that are, as usual, hard to get and expensive...and actually have little if any benefit to life..

To some of us they aren't so new, I remember people pulling faces at me 30 years ago. 

 

It is nice, refreshing but tart milk drink with beneficial probiotics which may help gut health or there again it may be just a nice refreshing drink.   Either way, we both enjoy it as a mid morning drink, anything over that is a bonus.

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9 hours ago, onebir said:

I had to google it too. Similar to yoghurt, fermented with more/different microorganisms, may be more beneficial to gut health; apparently more sour than yoghurt, so people might just prefer the taste.

 

OP: You can't just buy ready-made kefir & use it as a starter, like yoghurt?

Similar to yoghurt is how I describe it to people who've never heard of it, although it is a lot thicker than yoghurt drinks, more like the consistency of flavoured yoghurt I'd get occasionally as a child once it had been stirred.  Mam was ahead of her time and knew that anything that colour was bad for us.

 

I've been making yoghurt for donkey's years and buy a new pot of Bulgaria yoghurt for a fresh starter once a year or so.  Kefir is different in that the bacteria are grains and not invisible 'things' - not sure why they're called grains, they look like mini cauliflowers - and you can't make the drink without having obtained some grains.  Sourness - I honestly think it's more tart than sour, possibly a combination of the current popularity amongst the hipster crowd and the unpopularity of, or simply not knowing, the word tart, depends on you; leave it for so many hours or days before putting it in the fridge to stop it fermenting, the longer you leave it out the more tart it gets. This is a personal taste thing and known only by experimentation.  For us, in Chiang Mai for most of the year 48 hours on the bench is the sweet spot, a bit longer in the winter and as little as 8 hours overnight in the hot months of April and May then the grains also have to go into the fridge for the rest of the day.   In that, it's the same as making yoghurt; I don't listen to the newbie hipsters who tell me yoghurt is ready in 6 hours at exactly 42 degrees C.  Mine cooks away for a bare minimum of 24 hours at more like 50 degrees C for as long as my towel and blanket wrapped foam cooler will hold it there.  Somewhere between 36 and 40 hours seems to be the sweet spot for us. The longer it goes for, the tarter it gets.  Then drain it and reduce the volume by almost half and you can pretty much slice it. Magnificent.

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