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Australian airline Qantas' 'flight to nowhere' sells out in 10 minutes, report says


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Australian air carrier Qantas announced that a seven-hour scenic "flight to nowhere," which will take off and land at the same airport amid interstate travel restrictions during the coronavirus pandemic, sold out in 10 minutes, according to a report.

 

The unusual flight is scheduled to depart from Sydney on Oct. 10 and return on the same day, making absolutely no stops while promising passengers low-level scenic views over Uluru and the Great Barrier Reef, among other spots.

 

Buyers quickly snatched up the 134 available seats, priced between $575 and $2,765 depending on the seating class, a Qantas spokeswoman told Reuters. Passengers are set to travel on a wide-body Boeing 787, normally used for long-distance international travel.

 

“It’s probably the fastest selling flight in Qantas history,” the spokeswoman added. “People clearly miss travel and the experience of flying. If the demand is there, we’ll definitely look at doing more of these scenic flights while we all wait for borders to open.”

 

Last month, Qantas CEO Alan Joyce said the airline shed 20% of its overall jobs during the summer and the coronavirus pandemic has "made for the worst trading conditions in our 100-year history."

 

He added, "To put it simply, we’re an airline that can’t really fly to many places – at least for now."

 

Other airlines have offered similar sightseeing flights in Asia, as the region has seen a 97.5% decrease in international travel amid tougher border restrictions to limit the spread of the virus, according to the Association of Asia Pacific Airlines.

 

Airlines in Taiwan and Japan recently conducted similar flights to provide customers with the pleasures of air travel and help with steep declines in revenue.

 

Chen Shu Tze, 44, an engineer from Taipei, signed up for an upcoming Tigerair Taiwan flight expected to depart the city and circle over South Korea’s Jeju Island, the news organization reported.

 

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Brought to mind old Tom Waits song "Burma Shave" includes lines

"cause everyone in this stinking town

has got one foot in the grave.

I'd rather take my chances

out in Burma Shave"

Or else it might be the fine cuisine and spacious accommodations. 

 

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On 9/18/2020 at 11:26 AM, impulse said:

 

Just like I miss getting root canals when I don't need one.

 

I was thinking colonoscopy.

 

To pay money to go to the airport, wait in cues, and then be trapped in a can with unknown mouthbreathers for an entire day...

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Qantas and Ansett used to have "Mystery Flights" a number of years back. You booked a day and paid. Day before they call you and tell you what time to goto airport. You don't know where you are going until issued a boarding pass.

 

I went on a few from Brisbane and ended up in Sydney. Went on one from Sydney and ended up in Adelaide. They usually gave you pretty much a full day at destination.

 

Did read of one couple drove from Kalgoolie all the way to Perth to have one and ended up in Kalgoolie for the day.

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Who we would want to get into a  plane amd breath risky air for 6 hours and come home.   Seems crazy.   ,2400$  some people have to much money 

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7 minutes ago, Elkski said:

Who we would want to get into a  plane amd breath risky air for 6 hours and come home.   Seems crazy.   ,2400$  some people have to much money 

Yep. Very sad to think someone wants to do something different to your likes.

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4 hours ago, Elkski said:

Who we would want to get into a  plane amd breath risky air for 6 hours and come home.   Seems crazy.   ,2400$  some people have to much money 

before you post nonsense again read this

 

In fact, because of the high-efficiency filters on most commercial airlines and the frequency the air is recirculated and filtered, the air you're breathing on your flight is likely much cleaner and less contaminated than most office buildings and is on par with the air in most hospitals.

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