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Storm brings rain and much-needed relief to Si Sa Ket farmers


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Storm brings rain and much-needed relief to Si Sa Ket farmers

By The Nation

 

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Si Sa Ket farmers see hopes of salvaging their dying rice crop, as tropical storm “Noul” brought rains to relieve them from a severe drought.

 

On Friday rain began falling in the province since morning, and though the storm did not hit as hard as expected the continuous rainfall is giving the farmers some hope.

 

The Provincial Office Disaster Prevention and Mitigation agreed that the storm would be beneficial to local farmers.

 

A meteorological report showed that about one or two tropical storms could reach the province until October and it could result in flooding if there were more than 30 millimetres of rain.

 

Si Sa Ket has two dams and 16 reservoirs, which are expected to be full after the storms and would resolve the drought problem, helping the farmers to continue growing rice, an official of the provincial irrigation agency said.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30394758

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-09-18
 
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So this is Noul, plenty of rain but no wind. Where I am in Surin Province it rained last night and all day today, looks as if it will continue through tonight but it isn't a storm, just rainy season weather.

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Why didn't the article say much of the 1st rice plantings in SiSaKet died.  At least that's what fiance said.  

How can you have 16 reservoirs but only 2 dams? Dam it all. 

Edited by Elkski
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On 9/18/2020 at 7:57 PM, Elkski said:

Why didn't the article say much of the 1st rice plantings in SiSaKet died.  At least that's what fiance said.  

How can you have 16 reservoirs but only 2 dams? Dam it all. 

To address your second question, I think it's because most of Sisaket province is pretty flat with a very shallow incline in the water basin tilting down towards the Mun. You need valleys to build dams.

 

I reckon they are only talking about dams of significance though and those two mentioned are probably the ones in the river Mun itself. Most of the reservoirs I know around the southern amphurs of Sisaket have at least some kind of earthern damming at their outflow end.

 

The hills on the Cambodian border possibly offer the only real topography that would permit building of deep dammed reservoirs. It's only in the last few years that potential drought conditions have emerged on a consistent basis in Sisaket and one wonders where the resources are going to come from in these days of pandemic/recession to tackle the impact of climate change

Edited by SantiSuk
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