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TAT turning to the "super wealthy" to boost domestic tourism


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1 hour ago, Albert Zweistein said:

Only invest in Thailand what you can afford to loose, changing rules all the time, corruption and the need for a Thai partner owning 51 % of your busineness without investing a single baht doesn't make Thailand an investing paradise. So be wise, think twice !


I agree, but we have precedent for them changing the ownership rules for certain industries. If ever there was a time that they might be desperate enough to expand that more widely it is now.

 

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80 million domestic tourist trips in a country of 67 million inhabitants sounds quite challenging, isn't it? Especially when a few percent only have the financial means to do touristic travel at all,

yes they just contacted me and said thanks and to keep up the good work. 

Maybe they can lure "Boss Red Bull back to Pattaya for a weekend!

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4 hours ago, garyk said:

The middle class is where the money is, not the rich. 


This is exactly right. Regardless of how they have tried to spin it in recent years, Thailand has always been about mass tourism, making money from tens of millions of 3-star tourists rather than the much-vaunted 5-star tourists.

Now the phrase "super wealthy" is being used as a mechanism to prepare the ultra-nationalists for the recasting of Thailand as a second-rate tax haven for middle class Westerners who cannot afford the Bahamas but who will be under increasing pressure to avoid rocketing taxes in their own countries.

 

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12 hours ago, Lacessit said:

The super wealthy didn't get that way by being stupid. What is Thailand offering that they can't get anywhere else they want?

Maybe their siblings ? 🙂

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10 hours ago, donnacha said:

To be fair to them, they have kept the Elite Visa terms fairly consistent and hassle free, pre-Covid at least.

Hum....There were some rough times a few years ago when the program was about to go down the drain...

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8 minutes ago, alyx said:

Hum....There were some rough times a few years ago when the program was about to go down the drain...


I never heard about that.

Do you mean that they announced plans to renege on the visas already sold, but backed out of actually doing it?

I feel something that important would have kept being mentioned in the many discussions we've had over the years about the Elite visa.

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TAT needs to lure the likes of super wealthy Philip Green and his erm, wife and daughter, to anchor in Pattaya Bay.  

 

Phil probably brings all his own stores on his super yacht but at least TAT could make photo opportunities, assuming Phil doesn't punch any of the photographers, and Chloe Green would go down a storm with the ladyboys.

 

 

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11 hours ago, donnacha said:


I mean skilled people working professionally or running their own business. The sort of people earning enough that it makes sense to avoid taxes in Europe. Obviously, I'm not talking about online English teachers.

Even working for someone else, an experienced programmer, designer, or writer should be clearing a minimum of around $100 per hour and, unless you're just blowing your money on nonsense, you build up your nest egg over a few years. Most people have a house or apartment.

Working for yourself, you obviously earn a lot more, or you may as well just work for someone else. It has been relatively easy over the past decade for anyone focused to find a niche that pays a lot more than you could earn in a job, although people often have to try a few different things before they find one that works well. That's part of the point about being experienced. Making money gets easier over time.

I genuinely don't understand why more people don't give running their own business a shot, the Internet has made it so much easier. I think it might be a "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" problem. There seems to be hostility towards the idea that some ordinary guy in a hoody in a Chiang Mai Starbucks might have accumulated a thousand Bitcoin, but it happens a lot more than you might realize.

 

That explains things a bit more than most people.

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18 hours ago, webfact said:

TAT governor Yuthasak Suphasorn said he was doing everything in his power to make the target of 80 million domestic tourist trips this calendar year a reality. 

Meanwhile in the real world my friends daughter who lives alone with her young son has had the electricity cut-off.

She owed 6 months payments since March... 6,532 baht.

She went to the electricity company to ask for help and a repayment plan, they said she had to pay 2,141 baht that day and the rest in 2 installments, if she didn't pay that day it would be cut-off.

She said she had no money to pay, her son has learning issues [a problem since birth] he cannot go to normal school because of this, he attends some kind of day care where she helps out, her money is very little as it subsidises his care.

Because she does this welfare/social services have said they cannot help her with subsistence.

The electricity company came round the next morning and cut off her power.

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57 minutes ago, madmen said:

Could you not have helped them? A true friend would have. It's only 2k and it's an emergency situation. Telling us about it doesn't achieve anything 

She has both parents, two brothers and a sister... why should I financially help, I'm not a bank?

If I helped her to pay it would only be a temporary reprieve as it would not change her circumstances, after the bill is settled she would go into debt again in the future.

Having her electricity cut-off may force the issue with welfare to sort something more permanent out.

 

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22 minutes ago, hotchilli said:

She has both parents, two brothers and a sister... why should I financially help, I'm not a bank?

If I helped her to pay it would only be a temporary reprieve as it would not change her circumstances, after the bill is settled she would go into debt again in the future.

Having her electricity cut-off may force the issue with welfare to sort something more permanent out.

 

Two options:

 

Pay her bill anonymously.

 

Buy her a sack of charcoal.

 

Sad, but real story.

 

 

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29 minutes ago, donnacha said:

Truly naive.

Most Thai people are about to go through the worst financial squeeze of their lives. If the word gets out that you, the "rich farang", are happy to hand out $70 just like that, you will spend the next few years inundated with equally valid and desperate cries for help.

Thank you... 

The truth is she is one of many thousands who are going to find trouble paying bills... or any repayments.

Bailing them out is not the answer..

The government and local utilities have to work something more permanent out, but they seem more occupied in getting the wealthy to travel then help the poor pay bills.

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