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India's Royal Enfield to begin making motorcycles in Thailand


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7 hours ago, findlay13 said:

Well at least Thai made

 is better than Indian. Enfields re lovely looking bikes and I contemplated getting one, but I can't fault my Thai made 650 Kawasaki except it has too much plastic.A friend in Australia just got rid of his Enfield 500 for a Yamaha.He had nothing but trouble with the Bullet.Oil leaks plus,oil leaks ! Back to be supposedly fixed under warranty twice,Wrong!.No wonder they used to call them Royal Oilfields.

 

Must maintain the marque, they couldn't be British designed without the necessary oil leaks. 

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But I thought Thailand was going electric ...............LOL

Well at least Thai made  is better than Indian. Enfields re lovely looking bikes and I contemplated getting one, but I can't fault my Thai made 650 Kawasaki except it has too much plastic.A frien

I thought oil leaks were part of the specification for a Royal Enfield.  It certainly applied when I was a teenager 🙂

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1 hour ago, richard_smith237 said:

 

Stallions Centaur CT400 - 115,000 baht...  as close as it gets I think.

 

 

I wonder about the vibration of single cylinder machines though... 

 

 

Thanks, now my missus wants one 😉

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5 hours ago, Kerryd said:

Same as the urban legends about Harleys always leaking oil. I've had my 2003 Softail for over 12 years now and it never leaks but as soon as people hear you own a Harley they immediately start in with the quips about how all Harleys always leak.

It's interesting that 3 days ago, Harley announced it was pulling out of the Indian market as it couldn't compete with the local brands like Royal Enfield. Then, 3 days after that announcement, Royal Enfield announces it will be opening an assembly plant in Thailand, where Harley also opened an assembly plant not long ago (in the far, North-West tip of Rayong province, almost due East of Laem Chabang).

Harley had specifically designed smaller cc bikes (in the 500-750cc range) in an effort to compete in the Indian/SE Asian markets but their best efforts couldn't compete with the much cheaper local brands. (One article notes that in India, Harley's cheapest model went for about twice what a comparable Royal Enfield goes for.)
(Yeah for union labour !)

Harley also announced awhile ago that it was shifting it's production of bikes for the Chinese market to Thailand due to the trade war going on between the US and China. Can't see them doing much better against the local Chinese brands than they did against the Indian manufacturers.

If they were smart, they'd come out with something in the 125-150cc range with a different style and priced to undercut the local markets. That cc range is probably the largest motorcycle market in the world (as India/China and SE Asia make up nearly 60% of the total population on earth by themselves).
Add in the Middle East and Central/South American markets and you're probably looking at nearly 75% of the motorcycle market on the planet, most of which is geared towards the smaller cc models.

I'm not really enamoured with the Royal Enfield's looks personally. Even their "Adventure" model (the Himalayan) falls short, and not just because it's only 650ccs. It basically looks like every other Royal Enfield except for the tires.

Kinda surprised that the Thai market isn't flooded with Chinese brands like Lifan though. You'd think they would have dominated, especially during the Thaksin era.

Probably will happen eventually though.

 

No in the states the quip to a Harley rider is where did you leave your trailer.

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5 hours ago, Kerryd said:

Same as the urban legends about Harleys always leaking oil. I've had my 2003 Softail for over 12 years now and it never leaks but as soon as people hear you own a Harley they immediately start in with the quips about how all Harleys always leak.

It's interesting that 3 days ago, Harley announced it was pulling out of the Indian market as it couldn't compete with the local brands like Royal Enfield. Then, 3 days after that announcement, Royal Enfield announces it will be opening an assembly plant in Thailand, where Harley also opened an assembly plant not long ago (in the far, North-West tip of Rayong province, almost due East of Laem Chabang).

Harley had specifically designed smaller cc bikes (in the 500-750cc range) in an effort to compete in the Indian/SE Asian markets but their best efforts couldn't compete with the much cheaper local brands. (One article notes that in India, Harley's cheapest model went for about twice what a comparable Royal Enfield goes for.)
(Yeah for union labour !)

Harley also announced awhile ago that it was shifting it's production of bikes for the Chinese market to Thailand due to the trade war going on between the US and China. Can't see them doing much better against the local Chinese brands than they did against the Indian manufacturers.

If they were smart, they'd come out with something in the 125-150cc range with a different style and priced to undercut the local markets. That cc range is probably the largest motorcycle market in the world (as India/China and SE Asia make up nearly 60% of the total population on earth by themselves).
Add in the Middle East and Central/South American markets and you're probably looking at nearly 75% of the motorcycle market on the planet, most of which is geared towards the smaller cc models.

I'm not really enamoured with the Royal Enfield's looks personally. Even their "Adventure" model (the Himalayan) falls short, and not just because it's only 650ccs. It basically looks like every other Royal Enfield except for the tires.

Kinda surprised that the Thai market isn't flooded with Chinese brands like Lifan though. You'd think they would have dominated, especially during the Thaksin era.

Probably will happen eventually though.

 

The Himalayan is only a 411 cc single not 650. But It would be great to have a Himalayan  with 650cc  in my opinion

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7 minutes ago, Randell said:

The Himalayan is only a 411 cc single not 650. But It would be great to have a Himalayan  with 650cc  in my opinion


You are correct.
I must have been looking at the pics on one page and the specs for a different model on another. I even d/l'd the spec .pdf for the Himalaya but hadn't opened it yet.

411cc seems a little underpowered for an "Adventure" bike but I guess they are building them for the local market (and keeping the price down). 

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36 minutes ago, CGW said:

Best not to mention "The Price of Darkness" :shock1:

 

The Lucas motto: "Get home before dark."

Lucas is the patent holder for the short circuit.

Lucas - Inventor of the first intermittent wiper.

Lucas - Inventor of the self-dimming headlamp.

The three position Lucas switch - Dim, Flicker and Off.

The Original Anti-Theft Device - Lucas Electrics.

>Lucas is an acronym for Loose Unsoldered Connections and Splices

Lucas systems actually uses AC current; it just has a random frequency.

"I have had a Lucas pacemaker for years and have never had any trou..."

If Lucas made guns, wars would not start.

A friend of mine told everybody he never had any electric problems with his Lucas equipment. Today he lives in the countryside, in a large manor with lots of friendly servants around him an an occasional ice cold shower...

Back in the 70's, Lucas decided to diversify its product line and began manufacturing vacuum cleaners. It was the only product they offered which did not suck.

Q: Why do the British drink warm beer? A: Because Lucas makes their refrigerators

Alexander Graham Bell invented the Telephone.Thomas Edison invented the Light Bulb. Joseph Lucas invented the Short Circuit.

Ha ha ha! Thanks, that's all cracking stuff! Presumably from a Lucas staff archive of disgruntled employees?

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6 hours ago, Kerryd said:

Same as the urban legends about Harleys always leaking oil. I've had my 2003 Softail for over 12 years now and it never leaks but as soon as people hear you own a Harley they immediately start in with the quips about how all Harleys always leak.

It's interesting that 3 days ago, Harley announced it was pulling out of the Indian market as it couldn't compete with the local brands like Royal Enfield. Then, 3 days after that announcement, Royal Enfield announces it will be opening an assembly plant in Thailand, where Harley also opened an assembly plant not long ago (in the far, North-West tip of Rayong province, almost due East of Laem Chabang).

Harley had specifically designed smaller cc bikes (in the 500-750cc range) in an effort to compete in the Indian/SE Asian markets but their best efforts couldn't compete with the much cheaper local brands. (One article notes that in India, Harley's cheapest model went for about twice what a comparable Royal Enfield goes for.)
(Yeah for union labour !)

Harley also announced awhile ago that it was shifting it's production of bikes for the Chinese market to Thailand due to the trade war going on between the US and China. Can't see them doing much better against the local Chinese brands than they did against the Indian manufacturers.

If they were smart, they'd come out with something in the 125-150cc range with a different style and priced to undercut the local markets. That cc range is probably the largest motorcycle market in the world (as India/China and SE Asia make up nearly 60% of the total population on earth by themselves).
Add in the Middle East and Central/South American markets and you're probably looking at nearly 75% of the motorcycle market on the planet, most of which is geared towards the smaller cc models.

I'm not really enamoured with the Royal Enfield's looks personally. Even their "Adventure" model (the Himalayan) falls short, and not just because it's only 650ccs. It basically looks like every other Royal Enfield except for the tires.

Kinda surprised that the Thai market isn't flooded with Chinese brands like Lifan though. You'd think they would have dominated, especially during the Thaksin era.

Probably will happen eventually though.

 

Interesting read but disagree with some (not a big Harley fan). You spoilt it all with your last dig at Taksin (not a fan of Taksin but he did far more for the people of Thailand than the military ever did). Anyway that aside there are Chinese bikes in Thailand, you see their stands in Malls quite often with black and white advertisement posters showing photos of old 1960's Triumphs (I am a big triumph fan). I have also seen small chinese trial bikes for sale in Tesco very cheap. I've only been riding bikes for 40 years and always owned Japanese bikes even though I would have loved a Triumph but back in the day when I was a 17 year old Apprentice Mechanic carrying a pint of oil and a bag of spinners when out on a ride didn't turn me on. Thailand is good at building bikes. 

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8 hours ago, findlay13 said:

Well at least Thai made

 is better than Indian. Enfields re lovely looking bikes and I contemplated getting one, but I can't fault my Thai made 650 Kawasaki except it has too much plastic.A friend in Australia just got rid of his Enfield 500 for a Yamaha.He had nothing but trouble with the Bullet.Oil leaks plus,oil leaks ! Back to be supposedly fixed under warranty twice,Wrong!.No wonder they used to call them Royal Oilfields.

 

 Not Thai made Thai assembled.

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5 hours ago, PremiumLane said:

Great bikes and no real issues with reliability. There are some people using them to travel around the world

Lots of photos of them in India where the frame and fork welds has failed ..... resulting in a faux chopper

maxresdefault.jpg

Edited by BritManToo
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28 minutes ago, BritManToo said:

Lots of photos of them in India where the frame and fork welds has failed ..... resulting in a faux chopper

maxresdefault.jpg

 

This charming lady may take issue with you BritMan.   She loves Royal Enfields.

 

Her channel is a good learning  lesson for all in Thailand.   She's a Dutch lady who wants to travel the world and visit all countries.

 

She smiles and does not get angry or upset about any difficulties she encounters.

 

https://www.youtube.com/c/ItchyBoots/featured

 

 

 

 

Edited by Andy from Kent
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7 hours ago, bluesofa said:

I understand the Indian produced bikes have the brake on the right and gears on the left now?

I rented one in India years ago (obviously British produced), it took some getting used to.

Had one in uk at the same time as a honda. Going down a slope with a corner at the bottom realised I was going too fast, grabbed front first, which really didn't do much, and shoved down with my right foot. Bike went straight at the bend, with me in panic mode, still stomping on the gear lever. Luckily no traffic and the ditch stopped me.

Edited by overherebc
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The 650 twin gets very good reviews when viewed as a budget alternative to the Triumph retro twins.

 

Sure it's not going to rip your arms out of their sockets.

 

And one point which is, I think, of considerable value in this marketplace is that maintenance is very simple.

 

I am biased though as an ex girlfriend from the 1970s had a GT Continental.  The proper one, 1965, 250cc, five speed.  In fact she still has it.  Hopeless gearchange, lousy brakes, inadequate ground clearance and leaked oil from everywhere but such a pretty bike.

Edited by In the jungle
Just thought of this
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8 hours ago, bluesofa said:

Thanks for replying, but I'm none the wiser regarding the gears and brakes? Did you mean because they're modern motorcycles they have now changed the gears/brakes to be the same as everyone else

Everything got standardized from mid 70's on .. Brit bikes used to be right foot gearchange , left foot brake .. 

but the Japanese motorcycles that were flooding in by that time were the other way around .. in an attempt to compete against the imports British bikes for the few yrs they remained in production towards the end of the 70's reverted to the now familiar right foot brake , left foot gearchange .. 

'75 Trident and '77 Bonneville with gearchange pointing .. 

 

IMG_20200928_122529.jpg

IMG_20200928_122549.jpg

Edited by Justgrazing
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