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Earthing system in Thailand


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Getting a lot of noise through my music equipment. I believe they call it ground hum. Normally using a three pin plug should fix it (I believe) but not seeming to make any difference. What is the standard earthing system here? Is it MEN same as we have in Australia? I did read somewhere homes here don't always have earth rods. There are RCD circuit breakers in the house which I assume would need to be hooked up to a main earth? Not that I have ever seen one trip. I wouldn't even be surprised if the cheapskates who wired the house points used 2 core instead of 2 c&e to save money. I am in a more modern estate but that's not saying a lot. We were getting shocks off metal appliances at my last place and when I went outside to check there was nothing connected to the earth rod and all the earthwires in the CB box seemed to be twisted together but not going anywhere.

 

Any advice appreciated

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Thai electric is different. No earth needed. 

As noted earlier, Thailand should be TN-C-S with MEN and a local rod the same as Aus, but this is a relatively new requirement.   Many homes are TT (with or without a rod) and there are a fe

You don't need to go into the water table mate and certainly don't need a 50mm diam rod. Ridiculous. Normally copper clad about 12mm diameter and a meter should be enough. You just want to go into moi

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Step 1.

 

Take one of the 3 pin sockets of the wall and check.

 

A lot of Thailand is TT-C-S this requires a ground rod.

 

You can check by looking at the PEA poles and see if about 1 in 3 has an earth.

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10 minutes ago, Kenny202 said:

There are RCD circuit breakers in the house which I assume would need to be hooked up to a main earth?

RCD (Residual Current Device) is designed to measure an imbalance between the L and N connections and doesn't require a local earth-ground to function.

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5 minutes ago, sometimewoodworker said:

Step 1.

 

Take one of the 3 pin sockets of the wall and check.

 

A lot of Thailand is TT-C-S this requires a ground rod.

 

You can check by looking at the PEA poles and see if about 1 in 3 has an earth.

I should mention I am an electrician lol, or was 35 years ago. Basically came out of my apprenticeship and did something else. Taking a GPO off the wall to see if there is an earth connected doesn't really say much. Like I said in my opening post I seen 2 houses here where earth wires were ran to outlets etc but only twisted together at the board and not connected to anything externally. Twisted together not soldered or in a connector or anything. Have seen lights connected here the same way!

 

So you are saying there is normally no earth rod in the home itself? Do they run an earth wire from the home to outside to the pole? Sorry if I am a bit hazy. We use an MEN system back home and the house is grounded by a copper stake usually under the main meter board on the house

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19 minutes ago, RichCor said:

RCD (Residual Current Device) is designed to measure an imbalance between the L and N connections and doesn't require a local earth-ground to function.

That depends on the type of RCD that you have and the equipment in your house. If you have a lot/few LEDs then a type a/c may not function you will probably need a type A, as the D.C. from the PSUs can stop an a/c RCD working

 

15 minutes ago, Kenny202 said:

So you are saying there is normally no earth rod in the home itself?

It depends on the supply type TT-C-S with MEN requires an earth rod.

 

But correct grounding is not a simple subject. It becomes even more complex if you want to drive an EV or hybrid vehicle.

 

Quote

Have seen lights connected here the same way! 


wire twisted and taped is the most common junction here, mine have wire nuts as well.

Edited by sometimewoodworker
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16 minutes ago, sometimewoodworker said:


wire twisted and taped is the most common junction here, mine have wire nuts as well.

It surprises me there are not more fires here. I live in a big city and don't remember seeing a fire or even a fire truck going to a fire. I lived in a village, 90% wooden shacks. They would join 6 pieces of figure 8 speaker wire, often different sizes to cover 4 meters to a light or power outlet. At night many of them used these bare flame lamps that would sit on the floor, or candles. Like a tin can with a wick not sure if kero or petrol. Never saw one fire there in two years. In many case in the village center if one house went up the lot probably would have gone

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As noted earlier, Thailand should be TN-C-S with MEN and a local rod the same as Aus, but this is a relatively new requirement.

 

Many homes are TT (with or without a rod) and there are a few that appear to be IT.

 

If your hum persists after verifying that there really is a rod and your outlet ground is connected to it I'd be tempted to bang in a separate rod for the AV kit and isolate it from the house "earth".

 

It's also worth verifying the polarity at the outlet, it shouldn't matter but it's amazing how often it does. Also, if your kit is on a 2-pin plug try reversing the plug.

 

 

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Problem solved. Changed the polarity around. Maybe a slight difference but still buzzy. Moved the guitar around, tried a few other guitars and leads no difference. Tried a three pin jug cord in the amp. Then I realized the 4 outlet extension board I am plugging into has a two pin plug on it lol. Took the amp straight to the outlet 3 pin jug cord and good as gold. Need to get me some 3 pin plugs 🙂

 

Funny because I read on a few sites last night mains earthing makes no difference to guitar hum. It's a grounding issue inside the electronics.

 

Thanks all for your help

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14 hours ago, sometimewoodworker said:

That depends on the type of RCD that you have and the equipment in your house. If you have a lot/few LEDs then a type a/c may not function you will probably need a type A, as the D.C. from the PSUs can stop an a/c RCD working

But RichCor's statement (post #4) remains valid no matter what RCD type is employed.

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35 minutes ago, maxpower said:
14 hours ago, sometimewoodworker said:

That depends on the type of RCD that you have and the equipment in your house. If you have a lot/few LEDs then a type a/c may not function you will probably need a type A, as the D.C. from the PSUs can stop an a/c RCD working

But RichCor's statement (post #4) remains valid no matter what RCD type is employed.

In as far as it goes I agree, it is too limited.
 

If you fit the wrong type then it will be more dangerous than not fitting one at all. Because you will be confident that you have RCD protection when you don’t because your equipment is causing it to not function and there will be no way that you will be able to know.

 

 

 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, sometimewoodworker said:

In as far as it goes I agree, it is too limited.
 

If you fit the wrong type then it will be more dangerous than not fitting one at all. Because you will be confident that you have RCD protection when you don’t because your equipment is causing it to not function and there will be no way that you will be able to know.

 

 

 

 

 

The problems with DC causing offset at RCD coils has been around forever but recently someone hit the regulation panic button and caused a whole bunch of confusion. This has not been helped by sellers of electrical components jumping on the Tube with dramatic test scenes.


A bunch of LED drivers on a circuit does not mean your RCD is saturated with a DC current. Tests will not always reveal how much of a problem you might have under different load conditions.

 

The only way to solve this is for everyone to fit a one size fits all solution and take away the guesswork of “have I got the correct RCD fitted”

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12 minutes ago, maxpower said:

The only way to solve this is for everyone to fit a one size fits all solution and take away the guesswork of “have I got the correct RCD fitted”

Which is the correct type?
 

Type AC (inexpensive)

Type A (not so cheap)

Type B (quite a bit more expensive)

Type F (rather ridiculously priced if you don’t need it)

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1 minute ago, sometimewoodworker said:

Which is the correct type?
 

Type AC (inexpensive)

Type A (not so cheap)

Type B (quite a bit more expensive)

Type F (rather ridiculously priced if you don’t need it)

For home use I would say type A will become the standard when the price feast is over. 

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