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Are Thai language courses offered by universities considered as formal education - allowing for entry on ED visa?


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It is my understanding that entering Thailand on an ED visa is dependent of whether it is for formal education or informal education - with the latter being excluded from the possibility of obtaining a Certificate of Entry at this point. Would a Thai language course offered by / in association with universities (as formal education institutions) currently allow for obtaining a CoE into Thailand? Any links to respective programs? Thanks.

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I think that a language course offered by a university or equal that is registered at the ministry of education as a formal school will be accepted.

This from a embassy website. "except for students of non-formal schools in accordance with laws on private schools or of any other similar private educational establishments"

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Formal education means studying something where you collect credit points and will graduate with a bachelor, master or PHD.

Everything else is informal. Thus a one year Thai course where you study twice a week is informal, it doesn't matter if it's done at a University or language school.

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45 minutes ago, jackdd said:

Formal education means studying something where you collect credit points and will graduate with a bachelor, master or PHD.

Everything else is informal. Thus a one year Thai course where you study twice a week is informal, it doesn't matter if it's done at a University or language school.

Not always.

There are some universities that are offering language studies. I am sure they go more than twice a week.

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I think that in order for a university to issue documents for ed visa one must be a full time student which in most (if not all) cases means a minimum of 4 subjects/ term 

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1 hour ago, LukKrueng said:

I think that in order for a university to issue documents for ed visa one must be a full time student which in most (if not all) cases means a minimum of 4 subjects/ term 

You are wrong

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21 minutes ago, 5633572526 said:

You are wrong

Thank you for your comment and i apologise for being wrong. Would you care to elaborate what I was wrong about? I must admit that what I wrote is based on knowledge specific to one university in BKK from 18 years ago. Friends who studied there on ed visas arranged and maintained by the University were warned not to drop below 4 subjects per semester as the university will not support their visas if they do

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Many universities offer intensive Thai language courses which are considered formal and in theory should qualify you to enter Thailand if you enroll.  One such example is the Center for Thai as a Foreign Language, Faculty of Arts, Chulalongkorn University.  There are many others.  

 

These courses involve a lot more time and effort than your typical easy language school classes.  

 

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47 minutes ago, LukKrueng said:

Thank you for your comment and i apologise for being wrong. Would you care to elaborate what I was wrong about? I must admit that what I wrote is based on knowledge specific to one university in BKK from 18 years ago. Friends who studied there on ed visas arranged and maintained by the University were warned not to drop below 4 subjects per semester as the university will not support their visas if they do

That is a different issue from whether a university is considered a formal school. Yes, individual universities may have conditions they impose on students. In the case you mention, I assume that, not only would they fail to sponsor visa extensions, but students failing to satisfy the conditions of their courses would no longer be considered students of the university. That does not mean that other universities (even, possibly, other departments of the same university) might not offer courses with less stringent requirements.

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I'm studying Thai at Mae Fah luang university in chiang Rai. I entered the country this way in August. It is a 4 year degree though. I already have a masters in Biology so I'm getting credit for the gen ed classes and only take Thai (will have to take 2 chinese classes eventually). Classes all online at the moment though.

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15 minutes ago, jdlancaster said:

I'm studying Thai at Mae Fah luang university in chiang Rai. I entered the country this way in August. It is a 4 year degree though. I already have a masters in Biology so I'm getting credit for the gen ed classes and only take Thai (will have to take 2 chinese classes eventually). Classes all online at the moment though.

Interesting that you are studying Thai and have to take Chinese. Obviously they have being a tonal language in common. Do you have to take reading and writing too?

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10 hours ago, Rockhopper said:

I came to Payap University in Chiang Mai on an ED visa. It was for an accelerated Thai language course. 

During COVID quarantine time ? 

 

 

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16 hours ago, LukKrueng said:

I think that in order for a university to issue documents for ed visa one must be a full time student which in most (if not all) cases means a minimum of 4 subjects/ term 

Payap University offers an intensive Thai language course that spans 8 levels, meeting 4 times weekly for a total of 60 hours for each level. Taking one level per offering, while time consuming, is hardly "full time", represents only a single subject, and is not a degree-track program. However, Payap University provides the necessary documentation and assistance in obtaining a education visa for this very program. Your comment may apply to a degree program, but does not appear to apply to some specialized programs such as this. 

 

I'm guessing the operative the word here is "formal", meaning properly accredited universities and colleges.

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When I asked the IO at CW this exact question last month, I was told that ONLY university courses would be considered for an ED visa. I decided there was not enough time to organise the paperwork etc. so opted for the Non-O instead.

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