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I like living in Chiang Mai


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15 hours ago, BritManToo said:

I've always found plenty of nightlife in Chiang Mai.

Bars, restaurants, girls, live music all over the Thai (student) areas.

Maybe not so good if you want to hang out with elderly expats listening to 70s rock music though.

Perhaps we can assume that unless stated otherwise when "nightlife" is referenced it is referring to western style nightlife.

I for one have zero interest in hanging out with a load of young Thais listening to too loud "music" that makes my ears bleed.

 

Sadly, I never found any venue playing 70s music since Nana surrendered to the DJ mania for noise compared to actual music.

I did once discover a Thai jazz band in Bkk that was interesting, but haven't lived in Bkk for decades.

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I like my house, my housing estate, the shops nearby. I like the weather, the mountains, the lakes, jungle and waterfalls. My kids are happy at the schools and universities nearby. We h

33 years living in Chiang Mai,so guess I like this place,when I first arrived here I used to cycle around town,now driving around  can be a nightmare,how things have changed,from one small

Still have no idea why people choose to live in a place where the pollution levels make it unlivable and dangerous to your health for several months a year. Been there, not worth the health problems,

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5 hours ago, Jack Hna said:

I would not live in Chang mai if it was free rent for a year. Seriously whack part of thailand that has done well to capitalise on tourism but even better keeping the real cheap charlie's of thailand contained.

 

CMSA - BIGTIME

Considering your apparent attitude to those financially challenged of us

:intheclub:

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9 hours ago, worgeordie said:

Well I have never,ever been on top of a man, or had a man on top of me,

so i respectfully decline your offer.no matter how hard things are🙄

 

regards worgeordie

might be a little Freudian slip in that retort   

Edited by rumak
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2 minutes ago, Maha Sarakham said:

I personally think Chiang Mai is one of the best places in Thailand.  The people in general are way nicer than the South.

I certainly agree that the totty is of a higher standard than in southern venues.

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Chiang Mai definitely has a  lot going for it but the game changer for me was the horrific and toxic smoke that envelops Chiang Mai for 4-5 months each year. There are many days during this period of time when Chiang Maii has the worst air in the world. No place is worth dying for and breathing that smoke for those many months will surely lessen and ruin your health over time. Also, pre-corona virus all the songtaews and tuk-tuks scurrying around definitely didn't help  matters either. Lastly, I surely was not going to do evidently many folks do is become captive in their condos or houses with the air purifier and a/c running. To me that is no way to live life to become captive and a prisoner in one's abode.

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Multiple off topic posts removed, please stay on topic:

 

I like living in Chiang Mai

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On 10/17/2020 at 3:21 AM, Lacessit said:

My GF knows how to cook okra, I've taught her, along with a few other things.

I'd put eating okra raw in the same bucket as eating raw eggs.

They are very, very good pickled.  Top and tail them, couple of bay leaves in the bottom of a jar to keep them a bit crunchy, herbs or spices according to taste and curing salt (it really has to be salt with no iodine, it stops the fermenting).  Weigh the veggies and water for total weight (without the jar) and calculate 2.5 to 3% salt.  Seal jar, leave it on a plate in case it bubbles over, in a dark spot.  Start checking after 2 days, then daily until they have the taste you want. The sweet spot for me with okra is 5 days.

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24 minutes ago, Konini said:

They are very, very good pickled.  Top and tail them, couple of bay leaves in the bottom of a jar to keep them a bit crunchy, herbs or spices according to taste and curing salt (it really has to be salt with no iodine, it stops the fermenting).  Weigh the veggies and water for total weight (without the jar) and calculate 2.5 to 3% salt.  Seal jar, leave it on a plate in case it bubbles over, in a dark spot.  Start checking after 2 days, then daily until they have the taste you want. The sweet spot for me with okra is 5 days.

I used to bottle my own kalamata olives in Australia, hundreds of them on a neighbor's tree. Bay leaf, garlic, salt, vinegar, slice of onion. Virgin olive oil on top, turn over once a week to coat the olives with oil. Took about six weeks. An Italian friend said they were the best he had ever tasted.

Come to think of it, I don't think I've ever seen an olive tree around Chiang Mai. Not part of Thai cuisine, or maybe the climate or soil is wrong.

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23 minutes ago, Lacessit said:

Come to think of it, I don't think I've ever seen an olive tree around Chiang Mai. Not part of Thai cuisine, or maybe the climate or soil is wrong.

The former most likely:

Quote

Chinese olives are inherent to subtropical Asia and Africa. It is cultivated throughout greater China, Japan, Vietnam and Malaysia. It prefers warm summer, consistent rainfall and is sensitive cold and does not withstand sub-zero temperature. It could tolerate various growing conditions from poor soil to drought. The cultivar is naturalized outside Asia in Eastern and Northern United States where it revitalizes forested areas and attracts birds.

https://www.healthbenefitstimes.com/facts-about-chinese-olive/

Apparently these were introduced via contact with ancient Rome. So they should be pretty similar to typical Mediterranean olives. However I'm not sure what they're are like treated 'Mediterranean style', because in China they're prepared quite differently (as 'ganlan cai' in oil with olive leaves, or heavily spiced & sweetened. Both a totally different 'kettle of olive'.)

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2 minutes ago, Ron jeremy said:

staying indoors with an air purifier was a way to spend my retirement.

I don't stay indoors.  I don't have an air purifier and I get out and enjoy myself all year round!

Each to their own.

Edited by fangless
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6 minutes ago, Ron jeremy said:

its a great place until the pollution starts? Really?

I did not say that, in fact I have never mentioned pollution as I don't notice it.

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1 hour ago, Lacessit said:

I used to bottle my own kalamata olives in Australia, hundreds of them on a neighbor's tree. Bay leaf, garlic, salt, vinegar, slice of onion. Virgin olive oil on top, turn over once a week to coat the olives with oil. Took about six weeks. An Italian friend said they were the best he had ever tasted.

Come to think of it, I don't think I've ever seen an olive tree around Chiang Mai. Not part of Thai cuisine, or maybe the climate or soil is wrong.

Oh dear.  I forgot the garlic in the okra recipe.  Three or four nice fat ones, smashed and peeled.  It really doesn't taste the same without it.  That goes for everything lacto-fermented apart from preserved lemons, limes and oranges.  Also forgot to say when they get to the taste you want, put them in the fridge to stop the fermentation process.

 

Olives are something I've never tried to preserve, even when we lived in Australia. I really like the bottled ones, and didn't think I could improve on it.  I just wish that they weren't so expensive here.

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