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Brexit brinkmanship: Johnson says prepare for no-deal, cancels trade talks


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1 hour ago, polpott said:

Same reasons, their leader was a disaster who subsequently resigned.

Always somebody elses fault, facts are wasted on denialists.

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There will be no downside to Brexit, only considerable upside. David Davis   The day after we vote to leave we hold all the cards and can choose the path we want. Michael Gove

Why should the EU negotiate with an ex-member, that voted to leave ? They should let Britain stand outside in the cold for twenty or twenty-five years. Then maybe let them back in, if they ask nicely.

Hilarious so if  those 27  countries  all had an 3  trillion economy it should   be  81   trillion instead of the paltry 18.4  trillion

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6 minutes ago, vogie said:

Always somebody elses fault, facts are wasted on denialists.

You think that I should blame myself for Labour's failure in the election? I fail to see why.

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1 minute ago, polpott said:

You think that I should blame myself for Labour's failure in the election? I fail to see why.

And you don't ask yourself why Labour were a failure, could it have anything to do with Starmers 'Peoples Vote' Jeremy was the only Brexiteer among them, you shudda listened to Corbyn and perhaps Starmer shudda too.

Labours defeat was nothing to do with pot holes on the public highway. 😂😂😂

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Just now, vogie said:

And you don't ask yourself why Labour were a failure, could it have anything to do with Starmers 'Peoples Vote' Jeremy was the only Brexiteer among them, you shudda listened to Corbyn and perhaps Starmer shudda too.

Labours defeat was nothing to do with pot holes on the public highway. 😂😂😂

It was more to do with their long winded manifesto which had more holes in it than Sukhumvit.

 

Corbyn was pro Brexit, then sat on the fence then finally toppled into the leave camp.

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40 minutes ago, nauseus said:

If the EU had genuinely wanted to kick us out they could have done so easily and legally, 18 months ago.

I would love to know how. Would you mind to elaborate, especially the “legally” part of it by providing reference to the relevant laws? 

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2 minutes ago, polpott said:

It was more to do with their long winded manifesto which had more holes in it than Sukhumvit.

 

Corbyn was pro Brexit, then sat on the fence then finally toppled into the leave camp.

You still haven't given me a good reason why remain folk didn't bite the bullet and vote for a party that guaranteed remain, the Lib Dems, socialists voted Conservative on mass to LEAVE the EU..........🤒........Give it another shot...

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about UE REACH and if you have no time to watching the hearings, can can access the transcript

 

just an extract:

Quote

We would like to see more opportunities. We are struggling to see them, as the vast majority of our members will want to keep manufacturing to EU REACH standards.

 

Chair: Thank you. Do you see any opportunities?

 

Tom Bowtell: The UK authorities have a more pragmatic and riskbased approach to chemicals management than the EU. This may bring opportunities in the future, but, where it gives rise to trade or environmental concerns, we would not be in favour of that kind of divergence.

 

Silvia Segna: To Tom’s point, the risk of weakening the competitiveness of the UK chemical industry is the biggest threat as the transition comes to an end. As to the implications for chemical policy, any substance that is manufactured in the UK or imported would be subject to dual regulation to place it on both the UK and the EU market, considering our strong trading relationship with the EU. This could directly affect the future viability of products.

 

There may be opportunities for chemical policy, in improving chemical legislation and its processes, and making efficiencies, with more riskbased evaluation of chemicals. We could see further support in the UK for the use of alternative methods to animal testing, while ensuring a high level of human health and environmental protection. However, overall, the opportunities tend to be outweighed by the challenges that businesses will face in responding to separate and parallel regimes going forward.

 

Dr Michael Warhurst: From CHEM Trust’s point of view, we know that EU REACH is the most advanced system in the world. It is not perfect and we are working at EU level to improve it. Ultimately, no real opportunities arise from the UK moving away from that system because, as has been mentioned, anything going to the EU will have to follow EU rules anyway. You will end up with the massive risk that the UK system has much less information and expertise in it.

 

The EU system has a huge database, built up over more than a decade, of information on chemicals. Even then, there is often not enough information there. The UK will start with an empty database and will try to fill it. Originally, it was going to try to fill it in two years. It is now delaying that following the Government’s partial deregulation of the system, so the information will not be of the same quality at all. The scale of the resources in the UK will not be the same, and we are worried that the UK system will end up being a bit hollow. Theoretically, there is a lot there, but in reality not so much is happening because there is not the capacity to do it.

 

We know there are chemicals in everyday use in our homes that are accumulating in our bodies and contaminating wildlife, from polar bears to killer whales. In one recent piece of research, they have been found in the poo of chimpanzees. The problem is there with chemicals and we are not going to address it better by separating from that system.

https://committees.parliament.uk/oralevidence/1020/html/

 

in a few week and whether there is a deal or not, the UK chemical industry one of the most competitive of the world (e.g. the french are far behind), will loose REACH

 

Believe me this is a huge huge self harm, and most europeans Barnier and myself included could not believe the UK would do that en 2017.

 

 

 

As pensioners, maybe you don't care, maybe you think it doesn't concern you but will only affect the young educated brits who voted remain 70%. Still in a few years, the loss of all these UE common regulation bodies will have a much bigger impact than tariffs.

 

 

And while we are talking at length about a Canada/Australia/Mongolia deal, anyway the UK has explicitly refused to take advantage of all these common systems : Police, Fisheries (of course), Satellites, medicines, chemicals, vocational training, energy, innovation, food safety ...

 

 

Capture d’écran 2020-10-21 084327.jpg

Edited by Hi from France
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17 minutes ago, polpott said:

It was more to do with their long winded manifesto which had more holes in it than Sukhumvit.

 

Corbyn was pro Brexit, then sat on the fence then finally toppled into the leave camp.

Corbyn was a coward. He knew the EU was flawed and that Brexit was a good idea but decided to sit on the fence because he thought it was easier politically to do so.

 

It cost him the leadership of the party and any credibility he might have once had. Fortunately for Jezza, given that he was a fringe lunatic Marxist champagne socialist, the loss of credibility was comparable to a bat losing it's eyesight 🤣.

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1 minute ago, JonnyF said:

Corbyn was a coward. He knew the EU was flawed and that Brexit was a good idea but decided to sit on the fence because he thought it was easier politically to do so.

 

It cost him the leadership of the party and any credibility he might have once had. Fortunately for Jezza, given that he was a fringe lunatic Marxist champagne socialist, the loss of credibility was comparable to a bat losing it's eyesight 🤣.

Agree except that Corbyn had been anti EU throughout his career. Was part of the leave campaign in 75.

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15 minutes ago, Hi from France said:

about UE REACH and if you have no time to watching the hearings, can can access the transcript

 

just an extract:

https://committees.parliament.uk/oralevidence/1020/html/

 

in a few week and whether there is a deal or not, the UK chemical industry one of the most competitive of the world (e.g. the french are far behind), will loose REACH

 

Believe me this is a huge huge self harm, and most europeans Barnier and myself included could not believe the UK would do that en 2017.

 

 

 

As pensioners, maybe you don't care, maybe you think it doesn't concern you but will only affect the young educated brits who voted remain 70%. Still in a few years, the loss of all these UE common regulation bodies will have a much bigger impact than tariffs.

 

 

And while we are talking at length about a Canada/Australia/Mongolia deal, anyway the UK has explicitly refused to take advantage of all these common systems : Police, Fisheries (of course), Satellites, medicines, chemicals, vocational training, energy, innovation, food safety ...

 

 

Capture d’écran 2020-10-21 084327.jpg

Where did you find this ridiculous map?

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2 hours ago, Tofer said:

It's being frustrated by the EU who, by the way, did a U turn on the Canada+++ style deal proposed / available in the early days, and seem to think they can demand that we will still be subject to EU rules and laws, contrary to the terms laid down in that hallowed document, the WA, that the EU seem no more inclined to abide by than the UK. They don't seem to have grasped the fact we've left the club, and now are completely outside the governance of the EU.

Yeah thank goodness that Johnson came up with his cunning North Korea + deal.

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