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Private Car Sale Document Authentication


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I have attempted to buy 2 cars in the past week but didn't since the seller's names were not in the blue books. They said they had power of attorney (PA) or authorization to sell the vehicles from the owners. However highly improbable since one owner was in Russia. There were other discrepancies in how they described the vehicle and what was discovered upon physical examination. So I didn't feel comfortable pursing either purchase.

 

Is there a way to determine if there are any legal or police issues with a motor vehicle? Is there a police clearance certificate or something similar that verifies the vehicle is not wanted by the police, stolen, used in a crime, etc.? If there is, how is it obtained? At some of the vehicle auctions they talk about police clearance.

 

How can one tell if the blue book is the original or a replacement? There must be a way to issue a second or third book if the original was lost or stolen. Will these subsequent books have all of the details of the original book?

 

What blue books details can be balanced or authenticated? Should the date at the top left on page 4 match the date on page 5 top right? What is the case if the dates don't match? Does a signature on page 5, or the last page with owner details have to match a signature on the power of attorney? Is there anything else that can be determined as improper or a concern in a blue book? Of course the frame and engine numbers must match the blue book and the manufacturer's id plate in the passenger door frame.

 

Finally, what is the ideal registration and payment process? Should payment be made only after receiving the blue book completed with the buyer name, along with the keys? What if the seller wants cash payment and not a bank draft? In the case of a PA sale, should the bank draft be in the name of the blue book registered owner or the person named in the PA?

 

Has anyone purchased a motor vehicle and had issues with legitimate ownership later?

 

 

 

 

Edited by Banana7
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It is quite normal that the seller's name is not in the book, but a signed power of attorney is given. Foreign owned vehicles also need a passport showing a valid visa for the registered owner.

I have bought many vehicles with cash and only received the book and signed transfer and power of attorney forms.

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14 minutes ago, stubuzz said:

It is quite normal that the seller's name is not in the book, but a signed power of attorney is given. Foreign owned vehicles also need a passport showing a valid visa for the registered owner.

I have bought many vehicles with cash and only received the book and signed transfer and power of attorney forms.

How do you authentic the PA is true and real and not a forgery?

Edited by Banana7
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9 hours ago, Banana7 said:

How do you authentic the PA is true and real and not a forgery?

Spot on stubuzz DLT office will be the place to do the biz.

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11 hours ago, stubuzz said:

You can't really.

However, if you are buying a car from a dealer, it will always be in the last owner's name. If you are that worried, ask the seller to accompany you to the Land Office and only pay when the transfer has been accepted.

It's the best one can do. There was a TV member, maybe two or three years ago, who had the finance company come and seize a company vehicle due to an unpaid car note. As far as he was aware, the vehicle was fully paid up and title already assigned. However, a former employee had forged a PoA claiming ownership that was accepted by the Land Transport Office. Then she refinanced the vehicle to get a personal loan and absconded. The thief was finally caught but having run the scam a few times, she plead poverty and it was all going to court. In order to get the vehicle back quickly and cut his losses, I think the real owner had no option but to pay off her bad loan.

 

If I was unable to positively verify the name on a PoA, I wouldn't bother. Regardless of the LTO and any finance companies or 'owners' being happy with it, it's too risky especially in these financially stressed times.

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1 hour ago, NanLaew said:

It's the best one can do. There was a TV member, maybe two or three years ago, who had the finance company come and seize a company vehicle due to an unpaid car note. As far as he was aware, the vehicle was fully paid up and title already assigned. However, a former employee had forged a PoA claiming ownership that was accepted by the Land Transport Office. Then she refinanced the vehicle to get a personal loan and absconded. The thief was finally caught but having run the scam a few times, she plead poverty and it was all going to court. In order to get the vehicle back quickly and cut his losses, I think the real owner had no option but to pay off her bad loan.

 

If I was unable to positively verify the name on a PoA, I wouldn't bother. Regardless of the LTO and any finance companies or 'owners' being happy with it, it's too risky especially in these financially stressed times.

So forged the POA signature and the ID card as well ?

 

Also had the blue book ?

 

something sounds a bit fishy with all that.

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