Jump to content

Investing or pulling out of US stock market


Recommended Posts

I have also invested a small % of my assets in BTC - which is  getting more and more acceptance from Wall St

 

The bigger BTC news is the announcement 2 days ago from PayPal that it is about to accept payments to sellers in Bitcoin, allow account withdrawals in BTC, and allow hodling in BTC. 

 

PayPal has 376 million members and 22 million sellers on its books. This announcement is HUGE.

 

Bitcoin is increasingly going mainstream.  Michael Saylor's purchases of Bitcoin, totalling $ 400mn, have opened the eyes of Wall Street and others.  As head of a listed company, is reasoning is clear and very sound. A listed UK company has just committed 10% of its treasury to Bitcoin and other crypto's.

 

The smart money is about to start flooding in to BTC. With a finite supply, as opposed to gold, for example, there is only one long-term direction for the pre-eminent crypto.

 

Any portfolio worthy of the name should include stocks, bonds, etf's, gold, silver, and Bitcoin. In the long term, however, Bitcoin will outperform the rest, which it has done over the past 10 years.

Link to post
  • Replies 50
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

trump will win and the markets will go up.  get out now and you lose

If stock market was easily predictable we'd have many more wealthy folks.   

Stocks will go up and stocks will go down, but assuming you're in it for the long haul the day to day, month to month, and even year to year change doesn't really matter.   Buy and hold some

Posted Images

So many differeing views on here which means just one thing: nobody really knows!

 

I screwed up by pulling out in late Feb, when the COVID downturn started, and leaving it too late to go back in. I now have a number of ETFs, mainly, which are there for the longer haul.

Link to post

I'm cash plus P to P lending. Pulled everything out of the sharemarket before the Saudis and Russians had an oil price war.

Staying out until I can see some value in what I am buying. Price: earnings ratios are ridiculous.

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
15 minutes ago, madmitch said:

So many differeing views on here which means just one thing: nobody really knows!

 

I screwed up by pulling out in late Feb, when the COVID downturn started, and leaving it too late to go back in. I now have a number of ETFs, mainly, which are there for the longer haul.

I thought this covid would drag the market and did like you. Now I have to wait for a good downturn to jump back in.

Link to post
2 hours ago, Oldie said:

This all sounds good. In the long run the market will go up. 

That is not even true. 

 

Many European financial markets have never recovered their 2000 highs, and 1990 as far as Japan is concerned. 

 

Wall Street is somehow the "last man standing", but for how long? 

 

Constantly propelling the US market comes at a heavy price: the destruction of the dollar!

  • Like 2
Link to post
1 hour ago, allanos said:

I have also invested a small % of my assets in BTC - which is  getting more and more acceptance from Wall St

 

The bigger BTC news is the announcement 2 days ago from PayPal that it is about to accept payments to sellers in Bitcoin, allow account withdrawals in BTC, and allow hodling in BTC. 

 

PayPal has 376 million members and 22 million sellers on its books. This announcement is HUGE.

 

Bitcoin is increasingly going mainstream.  Michael Saylor's purchases of Bitcoin, totalling $ 400mn, have opened the eyes of Wall Street and others.  As head of a listed company, is reasoning is clear and very sound. A listed UK company has just committed 10% of its treasury to Bitcoin and other crypto's.

 

The smart money is about to start flooding in to BTC. With a finite supply, as opposed to gold, for example, there is only one long-term direction for the pre-eminent crypto.

 

Any portfolio worthy of the name should include stocks, bonds, etf's, gold, silver, and Bitcoin. In the long term, however, Bitcoin will outperform the rest, which it has done over the past 10 years.

BTC has one major weak point: it can be outlawed any time by any government. 

 

For the time being, it is not a real inconvenient for the banking system, considering its very limited usage, but this could change if BTC became mainstream. 

 

Gold is not finite (for now), but it is limited (around 2% increase of the global stock every year), and it can't be made to disappear with a switch. 

 

In the end, as you say, diversification is probably the best way to go... 

  • Like 1
Link to post
1 hour ago, Lacessit said:

I'm cash plus P to P lending. Pulled everything out of the sharemarket before the Saudis and Russians had an oil price war.

Staying out until I can see some value in what I am buying. Price: earnings ratios are ridiculous.

 

I've got P2P in my portfolio......just worried that they are doing so well.....6.8% and 5.2%.......it is unnerving.

Link to post
33 minutes ago, Brunolem said:

BTC has one major weak point: it can be outlawed any time by any government. 

 

For the time being, it is not a real inconvenient for the banking system, considering its very limited usage, but this could change if BTC became mainstream. 

 

Gold is not finite (for now), but it is limited (around 2% increase of the global stock every year), and it can't be made to disappear with a switch. 

 

In the end, as you say, diversification is probably the best way to go... 

I am sure you are very aware of the fundamentals of Bitcoin.  One of the foremost of these is that it is decentralised, and is owned and stored throughout the world.  How can it be banned and who is going to ban it?  And, because it is "faceless and anonymous", banning will have not effect. It will remain a store of value and a cheap and instantaneous method of transmitting funds around the globe. Millions of dollars can be moved for a cost of a few cents!

 

Furthermore, I am encouraged that quoted companies are beginning to buy it, or support it. The move by PayPal into crypto is earth-shattering, in its far-reaching possibilities for Bitcoin.  And we mustn't think they have done it in a vacuum.  No doubt, they have consulted central banks, in the US and elsewhere, before making such an innovative decision.

 

No, I cannot see that there can be any banning measures applied to Bitcoin, for the reasons I mention above.  Possibly there will be an attempt at some kind of regulation in future, but that's not the same thing at all.

Link to post
51 minutes ago, CorpusChristie said:

 

    Do you have a link to the website ?

There is Ratesetter in the UK and Plenti in Australia. Others operate in the US, I don't know what they are.

Just Google peer-to-peer lending for your nationality.

Edited by Lacessit
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
1 hour ago, Surelynot said:

I've got P2P in my portfolio......just worried that they are doing so well.....6.8% and 5.2%.......it is unnerving.

Same here; however, not unnerved. I limit individual exposure to $500, that's the most I can lose on a single investment. Plenti in Australia has a capital reserve to compensate investors for defaults, AFAIK it has never been used.

1-2% is what the banks are paying depositors, but it sure as hell isn't what they charge borrowers.

  • Like 1
Link to post
2 hours ago, allanos said:

I am sure you are very aware of the fundamentals of Bitcoin.  One of the foremost of these is that it is decentralised, and is owned and stored throughout the world.  How can it be banned and who is going to ban it?  And, because it is "faceless and anonymous", banning will have not effect. It will remain a store of value and a cheap and instantaneous method of transmitting funds around the globe. Millions of dollars can be moved for a cost of a few cents!

 

Furthermore, I am encouraged that quoted companies are beginning to buy it, or support it. The move by PayPal into crypto is earth-shattering, in its far-reaching possibilities for Bitcoin.  And we mustn't think they have done it in a vacuum.  No doubt, they have consulted central banks, in the US and elsewhere, before making such an innovative decision.

 

No, I cannot see that there can be any banning measures applied to Bitcoin, for the reasons I mention above.  Possibly there will be an attempt at some kind of regulation in future, but that's not the same thing at all.

The US managed to ban private ownership of gold for decades, and it's probably more difficult to implement such a ban than the one of a virtual currency.

 

Central banks and/or governments could go after those who accept payments in BTC, in the same way that they go after those who make business with Iran, for example.

 

When it comes to restrict freedom, you can't count on them for being creative and efficient...

  • Like 1
Link to post
3 hours ago, allanos said:

How can it be banned and who is going to ban it?  And, because it is "faceless and anonymous", banning will have not effect.

Well...the IRS has already started taxing people on it.

 

https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/virtual-currencies

 

How will it be “faceless and anonymous” when you buy something online using bitcoin.  Will you have the package shipped to ...

 

Anonymous

123 Anystreet

Secret Location, USA

 

?

 

Your bitcoin isn’t anonymous.  

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
On 10/22/2020 at 9:01 PM, chicowoodduck said:

Good Lord, sober up!  And get off of your meds! 😱🤪😖

 

You must be the guy who tells everyone to invest in Bitcoin as well?

 

 

im too drunk on viagra. and i eat bitcoins

Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...