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Oxford University says COVID-19 patients experience symptoms months after contracting virus


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Oxford University says COVID-19 patients experience symptoms months after contracting virus

 

2020-10-19T094302Z_2_LYNXMPEG9I0PH_RTROPTP_4_HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS-OXFORD.JPG

FILE PHOTO: People walk past an illustration of a virus outside a regional science centre, as the city and surrounding areas face local restrictions in an effort to avoid a local lockdown being forced upon the region, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Oldham, Britain August 3, 2020. REUTERS/Phil Noble

 

(Reuters) - Britain's Oxford University said on Monday initial findings from a study on the long term impact of COVID-19 has found that a large number of patients discharged from hospitals still experience symptoms of breathlessness, fatigue, anxiety and depression two to three months after contracting the virus.

 

The scientists also detected abnormalities in multiple organs and believe persistent inflammation may be a factor for COVID-19 survivors, the university said in a statement.

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-10-19
 
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14 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

found that a large number of patients discharged from hospitals still experience symptoms of breathlessness, fatigue, anxiety and depression two to three months after contracting the virus.

Let's resume a little bit ...

1. The virus can be present in a person not showing any symptoms . ( Asymptomatic )

2. Once the symptoms appear ,  some people become seriously sick , others do not . ( might depend on the blood group . ( Type ' B ' seems to be less affected by the virus )

3. After being cured and released by the hospital , the symptoms can persist for a long time . Many organs , even the brain , can be affected and damaged by the virus . It can create lasting health problems .

4. A person who was infected and later cured , can be reinfected again .

There is no guaranty  that a vaccine will provide a long lasting Immunity to a virus that constantly mutates .

How long will it take to provide that vaccine to the whole of a country's population ? Will that even be possible ? And will it really help in the long run ...?

So many factors play in favor of the virus , that it is hard to make accurate predictions , apart from the one that the virus will still stay around for a long time ...

Need to learn to live with it ... it will put an end to socializing of any kind ( not in the WWW , of course ) if it does not disappear ... but why should it ?

 

Edited by nobodysfriend
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Oh, but, but  there are some posters that say the covid virus is just like other

flues.  I have talked with a couple of people who had covid, and they say the same

thing, that they feel the effects even though they were sick in April.

  I will be happy to get a vaccine shot, when it becomes available.

Geezer

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My cousin-in-law, 57 living near Manchester caught Covid-19.  He now walks with a stick, as nerves have been affected giving him a "drooping foot".  Unlikely he will ever work again.

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Why is this topic illustrated with a photo from Saudi Arabia?  Has Oxford University opened a branch office there?

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On 10/20/2020 at 8:28 AM, nobodysfriend said:

Let's resume a little bit ...

1. The virus can be present in a person not showing any symptoms . ( Asymptomatic )

2. Once the symptoms appear ,  some people become seriously sick , others do not . ( might depend on the blood group . ( Type ' B ' seems to be less affected by the virus )

3. After being cured and released by the hospital , the symptoms can persist for a long time . Many organs , even the brain , can be affected and damaged by the virus . It can create lasting health problems .

4. A person who was infected and later cured , can be reinfected again .

There is no guaranty  that a vaccine will provide a long lasting Immunity to a virus that constantly mutates .

How long will it take to provide that vaccine to the whole of a country's population ? Will that even be possible ? And will it really help in the long run ...?

So many factors play in favor of the virus , that it is hard to make accurate predictions , apart from the one that the virus will still stay around for a long time ...

Need to learn to live with it ... it will put an end to socializing of any kind ( not in the WWW , of course ) if it does not disappear ... but why should it ?

 

 

Coronaviruses generally do not mutate much, but mutation is not required for reinfection.  The four common coronaviruses that cause 30% of the common colds do not mutate.  So, you get a coronavirus cold and then the next year the same virus returns and you get the same cold again, because you got no immunity from the first infection.  By contrast, the flu virus does produce lasting immunity, but then it mutates and comes back the next year as a variation different enough to require a new and specific vaccine.  

 

Of course, at this point we don't know if SARS-Cov2 will show the same characteristics as other coronaviruses, but it seems irresponsible to assume that it won't.  

 

It is evidently not the case that all viruses have a similar tendency to mutate.  The measles virus apparently doesn't, for example.  

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