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U.S. reports about 300,000 more deaths than usual during pandemic: CDC


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U.S. reports about 300,000 more deaths than usual during pandemic: CDC

By Vishwadha Chander

 

2020-10-20T195538Z_2_LYNXMPEG9J1LQ_RTROPTP_4_HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS-USA.JPG

FILE PHOTO: Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) leave with a patient at Hialeah Hospital where the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients are treated, in Hialeah, Florida, U.S., July 29, 2020. REUTERS/Marco Bello

 

(Reuters) - Nearly 300,000 more people have died in the United States in 2020 during the coronavirus pandemic than expected based on historical trends, with about two-thirds of the deaths due to COVID-19 illnesses, according to a report released on Tuesday.

 

The report https://bit.ly/34gTD3L from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that 299,028 more people died between Jan. 26 and Oct. 3 than the average numbers from past years would have indicated.

 

The CDC did not provide specific explanations for the excess deaths but said it expects the deaths to include those related directly or indirectly to COVID-19.

 

The agency defines excess deaths as the difference between the observed numbers of deaths in specific time periods and expected numbers of deaths in the same time periods. The CDC found that excess deaths have occurred every week since March 2020.

 

Excess deaths reached their highest points in the weeks ended April 11 and Aug. 8, the CDC said.

 

The largest percentage increase in excess deaths from all causes was among adults aged 25–44 years at 26.5%.

 

The data show disproportionate increases among certain racial and ethnic groups, with the largest average percentage increase in deaths compared with previous years occurring among Hispanic people (53.6%).

 

Deaths were 32.9% above average among Black people and 36.6% above average for Asians.

 

The CDC notes estimated numbers of deaths in the most recent weeks are likely underestimated and will increase as more data become available.

 

Deaths from other conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and respiratory diseases have also increased in 2020.

 

However, the researchers said it is unclear to what extent these represent deaths indirectly related to the pandemic because of disruptions in healthcare access or utilization.

 

About 220,000 people have died in the United States due to COVID-19, according to the most recent Reuters tally.

 

(Reporting by Vishwadha Chander in Bengaluru; Editing by Maju Samuel)

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-10-21
 
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I read yesterday that 'excess deaths' is the real measure of the killing power of the virus because most of the deaths have co-morbidities. The excess deaths for Q2 in Britain were very high indeed, but not as high as the US figure of 50,000 or so per month. This virus is a killer.

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8 minutes ago, Pedrogaz said:

I read yesterday that 'excess deaths' is the real measure of the killing power of the virus because most of the deaths have co-morbidities. The excess deaths for Q2 in Britain were very high indeed, but not as high as the US figure of 50,000 or so per month. This virus is a killer.

Months ago I did see a figure for "excess deaths" here in Thailand. Should have bookmarked it. Might get something approaching true figure of deaths due to covid here. I would imagine pressure to list cause of death as "pneumonia" at hospitals, etc must be great. "What does it matter? Person is dead. You do want to continue working here, don't you?" Never disagree with your boss

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2 hours ago, Pedrogaz said:

I read yesterday that 'excess deaths' is the real measure of the killing power of the virus because most of the deaths have co-morbidities. The excess deaths for Q2 in Britain were very high indeed, but not as high as the US figure of 50,000 or so per month. This virus is a killer.

You need to sack your researcher as they are giving you some very crook figures. Here are the figures you should have read... https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/static-reports/mortality-surveillance/excess-mortality-in-england-week-ending-18-Sep-2020.html

Note that from June 19 to August 7 there were negative excess death and since then the figures have been essentially back to normal. I expect the very recent spike may affect the figures but it appears that the lower numbers in hospital, better treatment (through greater knowledge) and better testing (even though still haphazard) has meant there are many more recoveries than in April. In addition to that, the average age of victims is now much lower (According to the CDC, the largest increase in excess deaths is in the 25-44 age group.)

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18 minutes ago, mrfill said:

You need to sack your researcher as they are giving you some very crook figures. Here are the figures you should have read... https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/static-reports/mortality-surveillance/excess-mortality-in-england-week-ending-18-Sep-2020.html

Note that from June 19 to August 7 there were negative excess death and since then the figures have been essentially back to normal. I expect the very recent spike may affect the figures but it appears that the lower numbers in hospital, better treatment (through greater knowledge) and better testing (even though still haphazard) has meant there are many more recoveries than in April. In addition to that, the average age of victims is now much lower (According to the CDC, the largest increase in excess deaths is in the 25-44 age group.)

So you think essentially q3 numbers invalidate q2 numbers as indicated by the poster you replied to.

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If anyone would like to check for themselves what the (extremely detailed) stats for USA are, please look here:

 

https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus/country/united-states?country=~USA

 

To see specifically how any country in the world compares to another for 'excess deaths' go here:

 

https://ourworldindata.org/search?q=coronavirus+excess+deaths

 

Below is a snapshot of excess deaths in the USA compared to several other countries. Note that the excess is declining in the USA. Sweden is doing remarkably well with excess deaths lower than previous years.

 

Covid stats.JPG

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4 hours ago, Pedrogaz said:

I read yesterday that 'excess deaths' is the real measure of the killing power of the virus because most of the deaths have co-morbidities. The excess deaths for Q2 in Britain were very high indeed, but not as high as the US figure of 50,000 or so per month. This virus is a killer.

Here are the stats for England and Wales.

 

Note that 'excess deaths' have been pretty much below the previous five year average since mid June.

 

 

Excess deaths UK.JPG

Edited by Antonymous
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11 hours ago, Credo said:

It's just collateral damage from failing to do anything about Covid-19.

What was to be done , in your opinion?

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2 hours ago, Antonymous said:

Here are the stats for England and Wales.

 

Note that 'excess deaths' have been pretty much below the previous five year average since mid June.

 

The data you're using in your screenshots ends in early Sept, and thus is a month and a half out of date at this point. Plus, death reports from public health agencies always tend to be slow to come in and be recorded, which further adds to those stats being out of date at this point, especially with the recent spikes of cases in Europe.

 

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30 minutes ago, IAMHERE said:

What was to be done , in your opinion?

Pretty simple. Follow the science and wear a mask and social distance.

 

what part of science dont you understand.

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