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Coronavirus: Revealed - the risk of exposure to COVID-19 on a passenger plane


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The risk of exposure to the coronavirus on flights is very low, according to a US Department of Defence study.

 

This will be seen as a positive sign for the airline industry as it tries to rebound from the pandemic's crushing effect on travel.

 

When a seated passenger is wearing a mask, an average 0.003% of air particles within the breathing zone around a person's head are infectious - even when every seat is occupied, the study suggests.

 

The testing assumed there was only one infected person on the plane and it did not simulate the effects of passenger movement around the cabin.

 

Experts conducted the study on a United Airlines Boeing 777 and 767 aircraft and claim it showed that masks helped minimise exposure to infection when someone coughed, even in neighbouring seats.

 

It found about 99.99% of particles were filtered out of the cabin within six minutes due to fast air circulation, downward air ventilation and the filtration systems on the aircraft.

 

And it estimated that a passenger would need to fly 54 hours on a plane with someone who has coronavirus to receive an infectious dose.

 

"These results ... mean your chances of COVID exposure on a United aircraft are nearly non-existent, even if your flight is full," said United Airlines chief customer officer Toby Enqvist.

 

The study was led and funded by Transportation Command, which operates Patriot Express flights that use commercial planes like United's for members of the military and their families.

 

It took place over six months and involved 300 tests during 38 hours of flight time and 45 hours of ground testing.

 

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) said it had identified only 44 flight-related COVID-19 cases since the beginning of 2020, versus some 1.2 billion passengers who have travelled during that time.

 

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The CEO of Southwest was on CNBC last night (our time) talking to Cramer and they were saying essentially the same thing, and I doubt those two would get away (for long) with quoting wildly inaccurate information on such a noted platform, so it may be true. I hope so, because I WANNA FLY!

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1 hour ago, millymoopoo said:

Yep, sounds like an airline initiated/paid study.

Confucius say: Don't conduct study unless you know the result before starting the study.!

I think it was Sun Tzu in his Art of War.

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IATA is a global lobbying arm of the airlines. The claim of 1.2B travellers with no infections also forgets to mention that 1.2B weren't all tested. So they don't actually know. I want air travel to get back to normal more than anyone - but this all sounds like bs to me.

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5 hours ago, ncc1701d said:

IATA is a global lobbying arm of the airlines. The claim of 1.2B travellers with no infections also forgets to mention that 1.2B weren't all tested. So they don't actually know. I want air travel to get back to normal more than anyone - but this all sounds like bs to me.

Some airports are doing rapid antigen testing at check in. Finally!

 

I downloaded the study, but these things take a long time to go through. It doesn't seem that they tested for the effect of different ways the air nozzles above the seat could project viral aerosols. I would wear goggles on a long flight.

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Even back in March when I flew from BKK to YVR, Canada, I wore my mask except for

the times I ate a meal. I also noticed that the majority of passengers did the same.  In Taiwan

I seen most staff and passengers still wearing the masks. It was in Vancouver B.C. YVR that I noticed

that a lot of the passengers had taken off their masks, and that no staff at all had masks on.

  I guess some things have change by now, since Canada decided to take the virus seriously.

     I think that it is mostly the western people who have a problem with wearing masks.

It is not an Asian problem as people wear masks for even the smog of BKK and other

major cities.  I do hope that the mask wearing is kept on the airlines until we have all been

vaccinated against  this corona virus.

Geezer

 

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