Jump to content

Trump rejoices as Senate panel approves Barrett while Democrats boycott


Recommended Posts

Trump rejoices as Senate panel approves Barrett while Democrats boycott

By Richard Cowan

 

2020-10-22T142627Z_1_LYNXMPEG9L17V_RTROPTP_4_USA-COURT-BARRETT.JPG

U.S. Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) speaks with Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-SC) at a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting on the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to be an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 22, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool

 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Republican-led U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday approved President Donald Trump's nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to a lifetime Supreme Court seat despite a Democratic boycott, clearing the way for a final Senate confirmation vote planned for Monday.

 

By a 12-0 vote, the panel approved Barrett with all Republican members voting yes and the 10 committee Democrats boycotting the meeting after calling the confirmation process a sham. With Trump's fellow Republicans holding a 53-47 Senate majority, Barrett's confirmation appears certain.

 

Trump, who asked the Senate to confirm Barrett before the Nov. 3 U.S. election in which he is being challenged by Democrat Joe Biden, applauded the committee vote, writing on Twitter: "Big day for America!"

 

Barrett, 48, has been a federal appeals court judge since 2017 and previously was a legal scholar the University of Notre Dame in Indiana. Her confirmation would give the top U.S. judicial body a 6-3 conservative majority, including three justices named by Trump.

 

"The Senate majority is conducting the most rushed, the most partisan and the least legitimate process in the long history of Supreme Court nominations," Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer told reporters after the vote.

 

The Republican-led U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday approved President Donald Trump's nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to a lifetime Supreme Court seat despite a Democratic boycott, clearing the way for a final Senate confirmation vote planned for Monday. This video produced by Jonah Green.
 

 

Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham said the Democratic boycott was "their choice."

 

"It will be my choice to vote the nominee out of committee. We're not going to allow them to take over the committee," Graham said.

 

The empty seats for the Democratic committee members had posters placed upon them bearing photographs of people who they argue would be hurt if the Affordable Care Act healthcare law, also known as Obamacare, is struck down as Trump has sought in a case to be argued before the justices on Nov. 10.

 

Barrett, nominated on Sept. 26 to succeed the late liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, has criticized previous rulings upholding Obamacare but said during her confirmation hearing she has no agenda to invalidate the measure.

 

Democrats were incensed that Senate Republicans moved forward with Barrett's confirmation process so near an election after refusing in 2016 to allow the chamber to act on a Supreme Court nomination by Trump's Democratic predecessor, Barack Obama, because it was an election year.

 

Schumer called the Republican hurry to confirm Barrett "a naked power grab" through a "sham vote," arguing that Republicans broke the committee's own rules by approving the nomination without Democrats present.

 

No nominee to the Supreme Court has ever been confirmed by the Senate this close to a presidential election. More than 45 million ballots already have been cast. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has planned a confirmation vote on the Senate floor on Monday.

 

'LAW OF AMY'

Calling the committee vote "a groundbreaking historic moment," Graham said of Barrett: "The 'law of Amy' will not be applied to a case in controversy. It will be the law as written in the Constitution or by statute or whatever regulatory body she's going to review. She will take her job on without agenda."

 

A favorite of Christian conservatives, Barrett frustrated Committee Democrats during her confirmation hearing last week by sidestepping questions on abortion, presidential powers, climate change, voting rights, Obamacare and other issues.

 

Trump has said he believes the Supreme Court will decide the election's outcome and has made clear he wants Barrett on the bench for any election-related cases.

 

Republicans are hoping Barrett's confirmation can give a boost to incumbent senators in the party facing tough re-election fights, including Graham in South Carolina and Judiciary Committee members Joni Ernst in Iowa and Thom Tillis in North Carolina.

 

Some on the left have floated the idea of expanding the number of justices - fixed by federal law at nine - if Biden wins to counter the court's rightward drift in light of the actions of Senate Republicans in 2016 and now. Republicans have decried the idea as "court-packing."

 

Biden told the CBS program "60 Minutes" that if elected he would create a bipartisan commission of constitutional scholars to examine reforms for the "out of whack" federal judiciary, saying there could be various alternatives to consider besides expanding the Supreme Court.

 

Graham said expanding the number of justices after presidential elections would mark "the end of the independence of the court."

(Reporting by Richard Cowan and Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)

 

reuters_logo.jpg

-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-10-23
 
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 82
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Not just Trump rejoicing.   "The Senate majority is conducting the most rushed, the most partisan and the least legitimate process in the long history of Supreme Court nominations," Senate D

Acting in direct contradiction of the wishes of the majority of Americans in the days before an election is going to have vote consequences.

Another blow to freedom in America imo

Posted Images

Perhaps the Republican, despairing of retaining the Presidency and the Senate, are determined to salvage something from the wreckage by ensuring that they will control the court?

 

Mr Trump, driven as ever by his own concerns and interests,  may well wish to ensure a partisan bench should he carry out his often stated threat to dispute the result of the election to the court. Of course he may also have in mind the several cases against him which are waiting for him leaving the White House. 

 

And finally, were he a vindictive man (and we must if thorough consider such unworthy and unlikely thoughts) he may be rejoicing that if all else fails he will, despite being rejected, be able to ensure the striking down of his predecessor's landmark achievement - the flawed but better than nothing healthcare provision provided by "Obamacare".

 

That will teach the uppity so-and-so (I'm sure that he would actually use another word) for taking the mickey out of him over his birth certificate at that dinner all that time ago!

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to say that both the Republicans and the Democrats are as bad as each other ......but they are not.....shame Bernie didn't get in, but with Kamala running the show for the next 8 years (and AOC as VP second term) things can only get better.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Chomper Higgot said:

Acting in direct contradiction of the wishes of the majority of Americans in the days before an election is going to have vote consequences.

the election is already underway. 40 million have already voted. Nov 3 is the end of the election.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...