Jump to content

Moving operating system to an M.2 card


Recommended Posts

I like my computer, but the 128 GB SSD is getting on 5 years old, and I want to put in a 500 GB M.2 card and transfer everything form the SSD to there, so I can keep everything running the way it is, but just have a newer bigger operating drive. There is also a 1TB HDD in there that I will swap out later.

 

How do you go about transferring everything from one drive to another, and keep all your functionality?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 58
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Clone existing drive to SSD. I used Macrium Reflect free version..worked like a champ

Why say such a thing? Assuming the o/p's hardware can connect to an M.2 card drive then it would boost the disk read/write speed by a factor of several times. What's wrong with that?

should have listen to @Bruno123 in the beginning.... like I should had read the details you gave me for the True card, thanks

Posted Images

Recently I did exactly what you want to do.

I bought a Samsung M.2 and I used their software to clone everything. The software run in Windows.

Basically: Add M.2 to your PC, install drivers, run program to clone, remove old SSD.

It's easy.

Sorry I forgot the name of the program.

 

When you add the M.2 be careful with the motherboard BIOS settings. Some M.2 can run in different modes. One is fast and one is very fast. So even if your new M.2 works in the slower mode you might not detect that without performance checking software.

I have a good ASUS motherboard and I work with computers since forever. And even for me it was difficult to understand how the BIOS had to be set for the faster mode. Better double check what you do to be sure you get the best performance.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, OneMoreFarang said:

Recently I did exactly what you want to do.

I bought a Samsung M.2 and I used their software to clone everything. The software run in Windows.

Basically: Add M.2 to your PC, install drivers, run program to clone, remove old SSD.

It's easy.

Sorry I forgot the name of the program.

 

When you add the M.2 be careful with the motherboard BIOS settings. Some M.2 can run in different modes. One is fast and one is very fast. So even if your new M.2 works in the slower mode you might not detect that without performance checking software.

I have a good ASUS motherboard and I work with computers since forever. And even for me it was difficult to understand how the BIOS had to be set for the faster mode. Better double check what you do to be sure you get the best performance.

 

I checked:

This is the M.2 which I used: https://www.samsung.com/semiconductor/minisite/ssd/product/consumer/970evoplus/

 

The Samsung software which I used can be downloaded here.

https://www.samsung.com/semiconductor/minisite/ssd/download/tools/

I don't know if it only works with Samsung M.2

 

And this is one of the critical setting in my motherboard manual. 

 

1595726321_M2BIOS.jpg.401939f445035572681185c01c4bf80c.jpg

Edited by OneMoreFarang
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same issue last year, the system SSD that came with my computer was 128Gb, and was almost full, meaning additional programs needed to install to the D drive, slowing things down.  The steps I took were:

  • Purchase a new SSD and USB housing from the local Advice shop.
  • Place the new SSD in the housing and plug into a USB port.
  • Use "MiniTool Partition Wizard" - a free to download program to clone the old drive to the new one.  Because the new one is larger, it will ask if you want to expand all partitions accordingly, or keep them at the same size.  Expanding will waste space, as the system partitions don't need to be any larger than they already are.  Keeping them the same size will leave a large patch of unformatted space on the new drive, but this can be dealt with later.  The cloning will take a while, and the computer will reboot in order to copy the system files.
  • Remove the original SSD from the computer and install the new one.
  • Start the computer.  It should boot up exactly as it always has done.
  • Use "MiniTool Partition Wizard" to resize the 'C' drive in order to make use of the whole SSD capacity.  You can also hide the system partitions so that they don't show up in Windows Explorer, which can be confusing.
  • The original SSD can be placed in the USB housing and either kept as an emergency boot drive, or reformatted for use as normal storage.

I now regularly clone the new drive to a backup one using the same software, which gives me a complete backup of my operating system and all installed programs.

 

 

Edited by ballpoint
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

Recently I did exactly what you want to do.

I bought a Samsung M.2 and I used their software to clone everything. The software run in Windows.

Basically: Add M.2 to your PC, install drivers, run program to clone, remove old SSD.

It's easy.

Sorry I forgot the name of the program.

 

When you add the M.2 be careful with the motherboard BIOS settings. Some M.2 can run in different modes. One is fast and one is very fast. So even if your new M.2 works in the slower mode you might not detect that without performance checking software.

I have a good ASUS motherboard and I work with computers since forever. And even for me it was difficult to understand how the BIOS had to be set for the faster mode. Better double check what you do to be sure you get the best performance.

 

Using the term M.2 to describe a storage drive only denotes the form factor(the shape of the thing and even that is inaccurate; simply because there are differing sizes of M.2 form factor drives.

 

Usually, we are referring to M.2 2280: (22-mm wide and 80-mm long). But there are others, such as M.2 2242 for an instance.

 

But now the difference to which you were referring: There are M.2 2280 that work only with the SATA specification, which means that they will only be as fast as that interface allows. The same speeds as a standard 2.5" SSD.

But there are also M.2 2280 NVMe drives that connect via the PCIe interface, which has far more bandwidth available; with sequential read speeds up to six times faster currently. Though in laptops, half that.

 

You can tell the differences in the drives, even if the had no label, by simply looking at them. They have specific notches. It's the notches that tell you which kind of drive and whether they will be compatible with your device.

 

793d32bfe7674ebc995893a8af3661f8.jpg

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Though to add to the above, there are also some NVMe drives with two notches, not unlike the M.2 SATA drives. So if there was no label on the drive, you would then have to check which drives your Motherboard can accept.

SATA means just the M.2 SATA drives. SATA Express means SATA & PCIe. The small 'e' stands for Express.

NVMe drives need the PCI Express interface.

 

This of course, is just for general consumption.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bruno123 said:

 

Using the term M.2 to describe a storage drive only denotes the form factor(the shape of the thing and even that is inaccurate; simply because there are differing sizes of M.2 form factor drives.

 

Usually, we are referring to M.2 2280: (22-mm wide and 80-mm long). But there are others, such as M.2 2242 for an instance.

 

But now the difference to which you were referring: There are M.2 2280 that work only with the SATA specification, which means that they will only be as fast as that interface allows. The same speeds as a standard 2.5" SSD.

But there are also M.2 2280 NVMe drives that connect via the PCIe interface, which has far more bandwidth available; with sequential read speeds up to six times faster currently. Though in laptops, half that.

 

You can tell the differences in the drives, even if the had no label, by simply looking at them. They have specific notches. It's the notches that tell you which kind of drive and whether they will be compatible with your device.

 

793d32bfe7674ebc995893a8af3661f8.jpg

 

 

Thanks for the info.

You described the issue from the side of the M.2 cards.

There is the additional issue for motherboards. Which of the M.2 cards which you described to the motherboards support?

And which settings have to be changed in the BIOS.

Many people, including me, were used to plug and play of HDDs and SSD over the last decades. For most of them it was not necessary to set anything in the BIOS. It was all fully automatic. With the different kinds of M.2 cards that changed again. So be careful what you buy and how you install it. Motherboard and M.2 have to be compatible with each other and the settings must be correct to reach the highest performance. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...