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Govt closing gaps in EV charging station network


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15 hours ago, mistral53 said:

Always take the worst case scenario to sound convincing..........not!

I have solar panels on the roof - juice is free and clean.

Now, try again.........

Not Free Not clean The cost of the system and do you have batteries that need replacing? 

they aren't clean are they?.

 

it's cheaper to just stay with the Electricity supplier in the long run. just as clean & dirty

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15 hours ago, Greenside said:

The point about EVs is not the cost saving (and electricity price aside there are savings on virtually all running costs) it's the reduction in pollution, and fossil fuels will be transitioned out over the next 25 years.  Not only does the coal industry know this, but Big Oil sees the writing on the wall and is investing initially in infrastructure because it's easy, given the sites and relationship with retailers. You can bet that they will work tirelessly towards building their stake in renewables, the economics of which are improving even faster than predicted.

 

Your cynicism is not well founded. 

You Believe what you like ,For me  Nah .  

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13 hours ago, LukKrueng said:

30 minutes is a bit long, but still reasonable. How much does it cost per charge at a charging station? How much does it cost to charge at home? 


New battery and V3 charging tech from Tesla allows for recharge rates of around 24km per minute. And this is only going to improve as time goes on. 
 

Many people will install a solar power system and charge for free. In Australia you can get a 6.6kw system for AU$2300 (50k THB) supplied and fitted. Payback period is like 2 years. Suspect Thailand prices wouldn’t be much different.

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13 hours ago, Brandt66 said:

and they would do this at home over night(same me need max 6h 20-100%)

...and people living condos?

 

The biggest benefit to be gained  from EV's is in cities, but most people in a city don't live on house with a driveway........the infrastructure required will be huge as you have to furnish all the parking spaces with the ability to charge cars.

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On 10/28/2020 at 8:39 PM, mistral53 said:

Always take the worst case scenario to sound convincing..........not!

I have solar panels on the roof - juice is free and clean.

Now, try again.........

 

How long does it take you to charge your car?

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On 10/29/2020 at 10:02 PM, madhav said:


New battery and V3 charging tech from Tesla allows for recharge rates of around 24km per minute. And this is only going to improve as time goes on. 
 

Many people will install a solar power system and charge for free. In Australia you can get a 6.6kw system for AU$2300 (50k THB) supplied and fitted. Payback period is like 2 years. Suspect Thailand prices wouldn’t be much different.

 

How much area does a 6.6kW system require? 

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9 hours ago, Yellowtail said:

 

How much area does a 6.6kW system require? 

Depends on the efficiency of the panels, how much they generate. Let’s say 300-330w per panel. You’ll need 20-22 of them.
 

Panels generally measure around 1.65m x 1m. So, you’ll need a roof area of 37 to 40 m2 for your panels.

Edited by madhav
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2 hours ago, madhav said:

Depends on the efficiency of the panels, how much they generate. Let’s say 300-330w per panel. You’ll need 20-22 of them.
 

Panels generally measure around 1.65m x 1m. So, you’ll need a roof area of 37 to 40 m2 for your panels.

 

So best case scenario, the roof of a 20 X 20 meter 30 story condominium building with 180 units  would have enough roof area to provide solar power to something less than 10 of the units, yes?

 

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11 hours ago, Yellowtail said:

 

So best case scenario, the roof of a 20 X 20 meter 30 story condominium building with 180 units  would have enough roof area to provide solar power to something less than 10 of the units, yes?

 


I am not sure what your point is? Likely a condo in Bangkok would not even allow you to put even one single solar panel up. 
 

Thailand’s policies and incentives in regards to renewable energy, BEV etc are an absolute joke. The import taxes on BEV are ridiculous.

 

There are countries like Norway where they have taken this whole green energy and EV thing more seriously, they have ironed out all the bumps and the system is working flawlessly. There is no need to reinvent the wheel here. Thailand could learn a lot (if they were actually open to getting a little help from foreigners)

 

Right now in Norway 50% of all cars on the road are EV or plug in hybrid. More than 60% of all new cars currently sold are BEV. By 2025 all new cars in Norway sold will be zero emission.

 

Apart from having the majority of their energy generated from renewable sources like hydro and wind, they also have an abundance of charging points, AND they also have many government incentives relating to BEV’s:

 

No purchase/import taxes (1990-)

Exemption from 25% VAT on purchase (2001-)

No annual road tax (1996-)

No charges on toll roads or ferries (1997- 2017).

Maximum 50% of the total amount on ferry fares for electric vehicles (2018-)

Maximum 50% of the total amount on toll roads (2019)

Free municipal parking (1999- 2017)

Parking fee for EVs was introduced locally with an upper limit of a maximum 50% of the full price (2018-)

Access to bus lanes (2005-).

New rules allow local authorities to limit the access to only include EVs that carry one or more passengers (2016)

50 % reduced company car tax (2000-2018).

Company car tax reduction reduced to 40% (2018-)

Exemption from 25% VAT on leasing (2015)

Fiscal compensation for the scrapping of fossil vans when converting to a zero-emission van (2018)

Allowing holders of driver licence class B to drive electric vans class C1 (light lorries) up to 4250 kg (2019) 

Edited by madhav
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On 10/28/2020 at 4:08 PM, connda said:

Where do the "clean" EV stations get their juice?  Coal-fired electric plants like in Lampang?  🤣

At present Electricity generated from Renewables in Thailand is about 3%.

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2 hours ago, madhav said:


I am not sure what your point is? Likely a condo in Bangkok would not even allow you to put even one single solar panel up. 
 

Thailand’s policies and incentives in regards to renewable energy, BEV etc are an absolute joke. The import taxes on BEV are ridiculous.

 

There are countries like Norway where they have taken this whole green energy and EV thing more seriously, they have ironed out all the bumps and the system is working flawlessly. There is no need to reinvent the wheel here. Thailand could learn a lot (if they were actually open to getting a little help from foreigners)

 

Right now in Norway 50% of all cars on the road are EV or plug in hybrid. More than 60% of all new cars currently sold are BEV. By 2025 all new cars in Norway sold will be zero emission.

 

Apart from having the majority of their energy generated from renewable sources like hydro and wind, they also have an abundance of charging points, AND they also have many government incentives relating to BEV’s:

 

No purchase/import taxes (1990-)

Exemption from 25% VAT on purchase (2001-)

No annual road tax (1996-)

No charges on toll roads or ferries (1997- 2017).

Maximum 50% of the total amount on ferry fares for electric vehicles (2018-)

Maximum 50% of the total amount on toll roads (2019)

Free municipal parking (1999- 2017)

Parking fee for EVs was introduced locally with an upper limit of a maximum 50% of the full price (2018-)

Access to bus lanes (2005-).

New rules allow local authorities to limit the access to only include EVs that carry one or more passengers (2016)

50 % reduced copany car tax (2000-2018).

Company car tax reduction reduced to 40% (2018-)

Exemption from 25% VAT on leasing (2015)

Fiscal compensation for the scrapping of fossil vans when converting to a zero-emission van (2018)

Allowing holders of driver licence class B to drive electric vans class C1 (light lorries) up to 4250 kg (2019) 

 

Thailand has roughly 30% more area, yet 13 times as many people as Norway.

 

If renewables are so effective, why do they have to be so heavily subsidized?

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7 hours ago, Yellowtail said:

 

Thailand has roughly 30% more area, yet 13 times as many people as Norway.

 

If renewables are so effective, why do they have to be so heavily subsidized?

 

13 times as many people? I guess we might as well give up then? 

 

As for subsidies, maybe you are not aware that Oil, gas, and the non renewable energy sector is one of the most heavily subsidised sectors that has ever existed. This argument is brought up again and again but nobody ever talks about the other side. 
 

It takes so much money and energy to extract, refine and transport it, there is no comparison whatsoever. Also most people are not aware that in the refinement process, a huge amount of rare earth minerals are used. (Far far more than battery production)

 

Can always rely on Thai visa forums for a pointless debate about nothing. Honestly can’t be bothered with this.

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21 minutes ago, madhav said:

 

13 times as many people? I guess we might as well give up then? 

 

As for subsidies, maybe you are not aware that Oil, gas, and the non renewable energy sector is one of the most heavily subsidised sectors that has ever existed. This argument is brought up again and again but nobody ever talks about the other side. 
 

It takes so much money and energy to extract, refine and transport it, there is no comparison whatsoever. Also most people are not aware that in the refinement process, a huge amount of rare earth minerals are used. (Far far more than battery production)

 

Can always rely on Thai visa forums for a pointless debate about nothing. Honestly can’t be bothered with this.

 

Aside from the same tax benefits most all companies enjoy, how are oil companies subsidized?

 

In the US I am penalized with heavy state and federal taxes for every gallon of gasoline I buy.

 

I'll understand if you can't be bothered to respond. 

 

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