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Health insurance over 75 years of age


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When I moved to Thailand I assumed that either I paid cash for treatment, or I returned to Australia where it is free. There is a problem with this logic, so I found out. A couple of years ago I donated a kidney and now need 6-monthly check-ups at a hospital in Melbourne. Travel restrictions with COVID put paid to that plan. Also, while in Melbourne mid last year, I discussed having minor surgery, but first needed a scan. Several months later the hospital wrote with an appointment a couple weeks later. It would have cost me an arm and  a leg to return to Melbourne for a 15-minute scan. Returning to Australia is not practical. Also, where would I live while I waited between appointments?

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Health insurance will only get more expensive as you get older, looking at a summary of premiums from AAInsure, at age 80, Pacific Cross quotes 225,000 baht a year, most other companies don't even show a quote so I guess they would be higher. 

 

Of course you can get poor cover insurance for much lower premiums but why bother, ignorance is bliss often

Edited by scubascuba3
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1 hour ago, scubascuba3 said:

Health insurance will only get more expensive as you get older, looking at a summary of premiums from AAInsure, at age 80, Pacific Cross quotes 225,000 baht a year, most other companies don't even show a quote so I guess they would be higher. 

 

Of course you can get poor cover insurance for much lower premiums but why bother, ignorance is bliss often

The Thai based companies are particularly extreme in the premiums they charge at higher ages. International companies soemwhat less so, though of course premiums do rise.

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8 hours ago, Sheryl said:

 

If you were covered by Social Security while employed you could have continued that cover after retirement but this had to have been done within 6 months of retiring.

 

Pay no attention to your friends comments re insurance. Putting money aside each month will not provide sufficient savings to cover a catastrophic illness unless you  are able to do so for many, many years before having any expenses, which of course cannot be guaranteed. If one is wealthy enough to put aside a single lump sum of at least 3 million baht, that is another matter - but even then have the problem of what you would do once it is depleted. (And I am willing to bet your friends are not, in fact, putting much money aside).

 

As for returning to the UK - not possible if you are critically ill (not to mention the issues that arose with international travel during COVID) and having been living outside the UK may affect your eligibility under the NHS.

 

That you have had no claims thus far does not mean you never will. 

 

By the way ask if paying premiums annually rather than monthly will reduce them, it often does.

 

 

Thanks Sheryl 

The asking to pay premiums annually instead of monthly is not some thing that I had thought of so I’m now going to ask the Cigna sales representative about that option and I will post back the results.

 

Its funny but I have never asked any of my friends who regularly mock me for paying what they consider un necessary private health monthly premiums just how much they put away each month to provide cover for any future possible medical treatment costs. The majority of my expat friends are over 65 years of age and retired and are long term permanent residents in Thailand and as far as I know none of these expat friends have ever had any private health insurance subscriptions .

Several of those expat friends who have experienced past low risk health issues while living in Thailand managed to obtain treatment by using Thai government / university hospital facilities and often comment on how they will head straight back to those same Thai government / university hospital facilities should they ever require further medical care in the future. The favorite phrase that many of my expat friends like to use when we are talking about my private health insurance , is ‘’  more money than sense ‘’ .

 

I don’t want to sound malicious in any way but hearing that one of my mocking expat friend needs urgent medical attention and aftercare , but is personally struggling to finance the necessary medical treatment , would sadly bring a smile to my face . 
 

 

 

 

 

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20 hours ago, Sheryl said:

 

If you were covered by Social Security while employed you could have continued that cover after retirement but this had to have been done within 6 months of retiring.

 

Pay no attention to your friends comments re insurance. Putting money aside each month will not provide sufficient savings to cover a catastrophic illness unless you  are able to do so for many, many years before having any expenses, which of course cannot be guaranteed. If one is wealthy enough to put aside a single lump sum of at least 3 million baht, that is another matter - but even then have the problem of what you would do once it is depleted. (And I am willing to bet your friends are not, in fact, putting much money aside).

 

As for returning to the UK - not possible if you are critically ill (not to mention the issues that arose with international travel during COVID) and having been living outside the UK may affect your eligibility under the NHS.

 

That you have had no claims thus far does not mean you never will. 

 

By the way ask if paying premiums annually rather than monthly will reduce them, it often does.

 

 

Thanks Sheryl for your comments.
As far as I understand as I am classed as non-resident in the UK for govt. pension ( meaning I get no annual increase in my pension ) I assume I will need to wait 3 months for free NHS treatment should I return to the UK.      I have a daughter there who waited 18 months to see if she had a serious and life threatening condition - that was before COVID.      Some years ago I spent 6 months there during which time I suffered a very bad TIA, the property I lived in had an emergency pull cord, I was contacted within a few minutes by a local warden but it took over an hour for the ambulance arrive as any form of local hospital had been closed due to lack of funds.   Once at a very large district hospital I had to wait on a guerny in a corridor for some hours, once in a ward bed I was moved everyday for the next five days to different wards due to shortage of space.
At least here in my area I feel more assured of life saving intervention being available having already experienced live saving treatment by a local govt hospital before transfer to Khon Kaen.

 

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