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A bit of confusion here, on my part, Toyota Hilux Vigo Champ D4D 2.5L Turbo Intercooler. DPF/Catalytic Converter.


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Pardon my ignorance, but I am a bit long in the tooth and not that familiar with these all new all singing and dancing vehicles with all of their eco and save the planet specs.

I have recently bought a 2012, Hilux Vigo Champ, it has a few things that I have never had any experience with before, first being a Turbo, second being an Intercooler - These are a new fangled thing from some fifth dimension, however, I can actually work out what they do. What I cannot understand is an horrific addition called a DPF Filter and a Catalytic Converter! These items that the Devil added to modern cars (along with Satan's masterpiece, the EGR system) have somewhat perplexed me. The EGR has already been exorcised and now is only allowed entry via a 7mm hole in a blanking plate. So the next issue I have is identifying just what the other two power constrictors are and where they are located.

 

As far as I am aware, the DPF is a device that clogs up with soot and ruins a good engine. This piece of devilry seems to normally have some electrical connections and possibly even a fuel supply that allows it to ignite and burn itself into regeneration. The second being the catalytic converter, another device that clogs up and costs even more to replace than the other.

 

Looking online, the Catalytic Converter seems to be the first device in the exhaust system after the turbo, it connects in line with the downpipes, and from what I have seen has no other connection, it is just a passive bloated tube that converts unwanted gas into safe to breathe stuff....air. Then their is this second device the DPF, this from what I can tell is usually located further from the downpipes and has all of the connections mentioned earlier. Electrics, possible fuel supply and in some cases a spark plug or similar to cause it to combust.

 

Looking here on my Toyota, directly after the exhaust manifold and turbo is an heat shielded canister that has what looks like fuel lines connected and a few wires, so this to me looks like the DPF, can anyone clarify? Apparently this terrible thing is supposed to activate a light on my dash every predetermined distance and regenerate itself, this has not happened yet in 6000 KM.

 

Now, following the underside of the truck to about half way down the chassis toward the rear, there is another item that looks like a big fat bloated cylinder, (not the baffle) it is thick steel similar to an oversized Coke bottle with no connection electrically or fuel wise, do you think that this is the DPF or the Cat?

 

I am totally confused, they seem to be in the reversed locations.

 

If anyone has a Champ and knows which is which and has experience of how and when the REGENERATE cycle cuts in (Mine does not have a regenerate button/switch) I would be extremely grateful, I might be old and long in the tooth but I like to try and keep my brain working, so some knowledge about these items that I will probably be exorcising from my tail pipe would be very helpful.

 

Thanks!

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1 hour ago, Formaleins said:

f anyone has a Champ and knows which is which and has experience of how and when the REGENERATE cycle cuts in (Mine does not have a regenerate button/switch) I would be extremely grateful,

It automatically regenerates when it gets to about 45% full, but regular long trips/motorway driving will help keep it empty and prolong the life on the dpf and cat.

 

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Thailand currently only barely meets Euro IV emissions standards so most diesel vehicles do have EGR but do not have SCR or DPF. 

 

AFAIK 2012 Hilux Vigo for the Thai market do not have a DPF.  The canister below the exhaust manifold and turbo mentioned in the OP will be a Diesel Oxygen Catalyst.  These are similar to a catalytic converter on a petrol vehicle and generally do not cause a lot of issues unless they slowly get restricted with soot, and slow engine throttle response. 

 

 

Edited by Jitar
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4 hours ago, Jitar said:

Thailand currently only barely meets Euro IV emissions standards so most diesel vehicles do have EGR but do not have SCR or DPF. 

 

AFAIK 2012 Hilux Vigo for the Thai market do not have a DPF.  The canister below the exhaust manifold and turbo mentioned in the OP will be a Diesel Oxygen Catalyst.  These are similar to a catalytic converter on a petrol vehicle and generally do not cause a lot of issues unless they slowly get restricted with soot, and slow engine throttle response. 

 

 

Thanks, but this definitely has a DPF as there is a dash light that is supposed to come on when it regenerates, it also has an EGR and and  an SCR too.. So from  what you say about the canister, it now looks like the DPF is the box straight after the turbo on the downpipe.

Edited by Formaleins
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38 minutes ago, Formaleins said:

Thanks, but this definitely has a DPF as there is a dash light that is supposed to come on when it regenerates, it also has an EGR and and  an SCR too..

From what you have read, you probably know that you have to drive long and fast and hard to get the temperature and then it should regenerate automatically

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Work Vigo is a 2013 moidel and does not have DPF and AFAIK the DPF was not installed on Hilux until 2015.... in countries that required it with Thailand not being one of them.

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^ With Tojo's penchant to slap different badges arbitrarily over what is essentially the same models and the sheer complexity of their model range and sub-ranges, who knows what's mounted underneath or has already been removed from a 2012 Vigo.

 

Kudos to the OP for bringing this topic up though as it's an excellent opportunity for the TV petrol/diesel-heads to expand their knowledge of what the wife has parked in the garage.

 

1 hour ago, JAS21 said:

From what you have read, you probably know that you have to drive long and fast and hard to get the temperature and then it should regenerate automatically

Not sure if the 'fast and hard' applies here. They're designed so that the bits that are supposed to get hot and burn off the particulates do so under typical driving conditions without the implied need to 'thrash' the thing... although this will speed up the process if one's driving is more stop-start city driving or limited to weekend runs to the mall.

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4 hours ago, Techno Viking said:

Work Vigo is a 2013 moidel and does not have DPF and AFAIK the DPF was not installed on Hilux until 2015.... in countries that required it with Thailand not being one of them.

 

I have the genuine Toyota manual for the 2012 and it covers the operation of the DPF, there are two versions apparently, one is a manual switch that you click to set it running, the one I have is supposed to operate automatically, I will try and get a photo of the two parts and see what you reckon. Cheers.

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5 hours ago, Techno Viking said:

Work Vigo is a 2013 moidel and does not have DPF and AFAIK the DPF was not installed on Hilux until 2015.... in countries that required it with Thailand not being one of them.

I tried to get a photo but cannot get in with my camera, however you actually might be correct and the part I was thinking is the DPF may in fact be part of the back end of the turbo, it does not look big enough to be a DPF, hopefully it is NOT fitted, next time I am at Toyota I will double check, be good news if it isn't fitted! Thanks for the info.

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1 hour ago, Formaleins said:

 

I have the genuine Toyota manual for the 2012 and it covers the operation of the DPF, there are two versions apparently, one is a manual switch that you click to set it running, the one I have is supposed to operate automatically, I will try and get a photo of the two parts and see what you reckon. Cheers.

Are the manual references to DPF specific to the Thai version or qualified with "where fitted"?

 

Very hard to tell the difference between a DPF and DOC by looking at the exhaust system.  Toyota should be able to confirm but it would be a very unusual 2012 Vigo if it has a DPF and SCR in Thailand. 

 

Not all DPF's have a light to show regen and most do not have a manual switch.   Some DPF vehicles only show a dash light if there is too much back pressure.  Normally the hot DPF is noticeable occasionally after a reasonable drive (above minimum time, speed and load). 

 

The SCR system is easy to spot.  SCR equipped vehicles have an extra filler cap for DEF or Adblue, normally near the fuel filler.  If the DEF runs low, the ECU will stop the engine running eventually.  If the Vigo has no DEF filler, does not need DEF top ups at each service (or before), and it is still running, then there is no SCR. 

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2 hours ago, Jitar said:

Are the manual references to DPF specific to the Thai version or qualified with "where fitted"?

 

Very hard to tell the difference between a DPF and DOC by looking at the exhaust system.  Toyota should be able to confirm but it would be a very unusual 2012 Vigo if it has a DPF and SCR in Thailand. 

 

Not all DPF's have a light to show regen and most do not have a manual switch.   Some DPF vehicles only show a dash light if there is too much back pressure.  Normally the hot DPF is noticeable occasionally after a reasonable drive (above minimum time, speed and load). 

 

The SCR system is easy to spot.  SCR equipped vehicles have an extra filler cap for DEF or Adblue, normally near the fuel filler.  If the DEF runs low, the ECU will stop the engine running eventually.  If the Vigo has no DEF filler, does not need DEF top ups at each service (or before), and it is still running, then there is no SCR. 

OK, you make a lot of sense here! I think the DPF (thankfully) is probably my mistake and is actually the back end of part of the turbo.  Apologies over the the SCR, I was thinking SCV - the oil mist valve that has been around since the 80's - You are getting to find out the dinosaur era I am from. (all this scrimping for an extra 10 cm per litre has me baffled) There is no additional cap for the SCR (something else I need to read about), as I said in my OP, pardon my ignorance, this thing is totally new to me, I ran a 3 litre naturally aspirated EFI Tiger for 20 years which I would never have changed until my idiot son wrecked it!

 

The less "ECO" <deleted> on this truck the happier I am believe me.

 

Thanks to all who bothered to reply, all of your input is appreciated as it has cleared up a lot of nagging doubts I was having. But on a final note, just went to change the oil today and just as expected, the idiots that changed the oil previously (everytime) have tightened the oil filter using a ten foot extension bar and I cannot get it off and have had to order a tool from Bangkok to get it loose.....what do these idiots not understand about HAND TIGHT then just a bit more? Every time they change a filter they tighten it like the cylinder head bolts. but only after making sure that they have filled it with about 1 litre too much with oil!

 

Hell this thing takes about 7 litres already, why try and put in 8? Drives me crazy!

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