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Confirmed: "Big Bike" riders will need special training from next year


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3 hours ago, Seismic said:

What about the many big bike riders who have been riding them for years, or even decades?. Again, an ill-thought out idea, with many questions still left unanswered. Another knee-jerk reaction to a problem that does not actually exist, from people with no expertise in the area.

Common practices in other countries which have better road safety records. Absolutely reasonable to ask motorbike drivers to undergo training before getting a license, same as car drivers have to. The only issue is setting the threshold at a high 400cc where it should start way below that. 
 

(Even before this announcement I was looking for motorbike classes simply because I don’t know how to drive anything that has more power than a scooter and I don’t want to put myself or others into danger, so I agree with the direction even if the details aren’t right yet.) 

 

 

 

 

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What about the many big bike riders who have been riding them for years, or even decades?. Again, an ill-thought out idea, with many questions still left unanswered. Another knee-jerk reaction to a pr

Begin with an IQ test, that would filter out quite a few. 

So lets take a look at the Yamaha MT-15, it is only a 155CC bike, yet can do 140 Km/H. Enough torque and 6 speeds to accelerate as fast as a larger bike and yet would not be considered a big bike.  Yo

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The distinction has been in force for ages where I come from and it's a good thing. But back in stone age, when you could get a license for a "light bike", ie. 125cc max, they were already producing close to 40hp and fast enough to kill yourself with (I almost managed that). The distinction would better be made with the power the engine makes.

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1 hour ago, Kwarium said:

My guess is the 400 is based on the original coining of the “big bike” term back in the day of the grey bikes. The most popular and common, but questionably imported (mostly as parts to avoid import duty), were Honda CB400 from Japan. It was even fairly easy to get an actual green book, although numbers and such didn’t always match precisely. My CB400 book said CBR400, but I paid the tax every year! (Engine and frame numbers were correct!)

 

150cc was the biggest legally sold new back then.

 

It is proven every year that the largest number of bike deaths are small bikes crashed on smaller roads in the provinces. Last month a guy we know didn’t make it home after a night of drinking 10 miles away. They found him and his bike in the ditch next to a concrete marker post on a curve in the road. Sad.

 

Training is good, too bad they are looking at the wrong demographic. More lives could be saved by proper driver training for all! And can that ridculous video!

does anyone even watch that video ?

Last time i was waiting in the Land office, i noted about 16 people on their phones and about 12 sleeping, with only a couple looking completely bored

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22 minutes ago, Joinaman said:

does anyone even watch that video ?

Last time i was waiting in the Land office, i noted about 16 people on their phones and about 12 sleeping, with only a couple looking completely bored

 

Last year when I got to watch the ‘training video’ again for renewal, some lady interupted it at about 40 minutes and herded us all out to get the next group in. No one protested!

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5 hours ago, webfact said:

Confirmed: "Big Bike" riders will need special training from next year

 

2pm.jpg

Picture: Thai Rath

 

A senior policeman tasked with looking into changes to Thailand's traffic laws has revealed that motorcycle riders on high powered machines must undergo special training and answer more questions to obtain a licence. 

 

The new regulations apply to riders of 400cc machines and up.

 

Pol Maj-Gen Ekkarak Limsangkat, deputy of Region 6, said that the changes were announced in the government gazette and would come into force on 19th February 2021, 120 days after the announcement last Thursday. 

 

The Thai Rath story suggested that riders would need to provide evidence of having been through the required training before a licence could be issued. They would also have to answer additional questions on a test.

 

Exactly what this would mean has yet to be revealed. 

 

The government gazette announcement is part of changes to update and modernize.laws promulgated in 1979.

 

Thailand had seen a great rise in the use of high powered motorcycles in recent years, notes Thailvisa, with many bike companies producing machines in the kingdom.

 

A previously more niche market has thus become far more widespread. 

 

Furthermore Thai press reports of "big bike" accidents" now seem to have forced the hand of the authorities in taking action to address the issue, though the actual extent of accidents involving those on high power machines is largely anecdotal.

 

Thailand is one of the biggest markets in the world for motorcycles of all descriptions. 

 

About 70% of Thailand's estimated 20,000 plus death toll on the roads is motorcycle riders. 

 

Source: Thai Rath

 

thai+visa_news.jpg

-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2020-10-28
 

Are the CC's rated by the Geen Book or the Bike sticker ?

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2 hours ago, Stubby said:

I nearly killed myself over 40 years ago in the UK on a bike considered to be beginner-friendly. That meant any 17 years old could ride it on L-plates. I did 5 months in hospital and couldn't work for over one and a half years. I still limp like Long John Silver to this day 😞
 

THE NEW TON-UP SUZUKI 250 X7

 

Some of you will remember it. I'm talking about the Suzuki GT250 X7. It had an incredibly light front-end and did 0-60mph in just 7.5 seconds and still picking up fast. The top speed was between 98-103mph. A few years later, learner riders could only ride 125cc (I think), and they had capped speeds.

 

Once I passed my big bike test, I realized that larger bikes were much easier, more comfortable, and safer to ride than my 250cc Suzuki. All you have to do is respect the power.

 

Stubby

X7.png

A 'flex'7 exactly like that killed my two brothers due to lack of experience and the power and handling characteristics of the X7. It was an evil handling bike with <deleted> frame, brakes and tyres. My middle brother who was riding the X7 and had passed his test already but only by a few months and was still young and fearless. Unfortunately, that was his undoing and he took his younger brother with him. Very tragic for the whole family, especially my father who never forgave himself for letting them ride motorcycles. Youth and motorcycles are a dangerous combination and those of us who survived,  can put this down mostly to good luck. I'm all for training and limiting the power/cc  licenses of new riders, especially younger ones. It won't work in every case but I think having an instructor with the correct balance of enjoying motorcycling and instilling the correct riding attitude in new riders does help somewhat. Definitely an improvement to what we have now in Thailand and a good step by the government. That said, given the lack of enforcement, I think most Thai big bike riders are restrained and mature compared to how I was at their age.

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1 hour ago, taninthai said:

So probably around 200 big bike deaths and 16,000 scooter deaths and yet they still see the problem as big bike riders.....Thailand’s road carnage never gonna end

Quite agree .I ride a 1000c.BMW, it like handling a baby . Never been on a scooter I think there unsafe .

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