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Confirmed: "Big Bike" riders will need special training from next year


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8 hours ago, soi3eddie said:

Why not start with training any motorbike rider and enforcing existing laws? I saw three teenagers riding on Phaholyothin Road at Ari on Sunday. The insanely loud exhaust drew my attention. Three persons on one bike (150cc at most), speeding fast through heavy traffic and not one of them was wearing a helmet. I was expecting to hear a crash.

Believe me, it is all over the country the same big problem, even in the remote area where I live.

In Europe we learn, how smaller there d*ck how more noise they make.

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What about the many big bike riders who have been riding them for years, or even decades?. Again, an ill-thought out idea, with many questions still left unanswered. Another knee-jerk reaction to a pr

Begin with an IQ test, that would filter out quite a few. 

So lets take a look at the Yamaha MT-15, it is only a 155CC bike, yet can do 140 Km/H. Enough torque and 6 speeds to accelerate as fast as a larger bike and yet would not be considered a big bike.  Yo

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Here is the actual notification from the Royal Gazette. Unfortunately it's all in Thai of course and when I use Google to translate it, it comes out in unintelligible gibberish.

http://www.ratchakitcha.soc.go.th/DATA/PDF/2563/A/088/T_0006.PDF


From what I can glean, it does refer to new licenses and renewals. So theoretically, you should be able to continue using your current license until it expires. But - this is Thailand - and the cops could decide that everyone (riding a big bike) has to get a new license regardless of when the old one expires.

There's no way to tell how it's going to be enforced at this point in time.

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1 hour ago, BKKBike09 said:

 

"Assuming the light changes green, what's wrong with that?" - since the reaction of most road users here is to speed up, not slow down, when approaching a junction where the lights are counting down 3...2...1... and they know that red will be either "275" or, even worse, the dreaded "- - -" no time showing, so could be 5 minutes, dumping the clutch and burning rubber to be first off a green light is asking to be side-swiped. I always let some little guys on their Scoopys go first for that reason.

 

"On average big bike riders ride much better than the small motorbikes" - not really. It's just that it's harder to be an annoying <deleted> in Bangkok traffic on a big bike because many gaps are too tight. 

 

 

 

Yeah those late red light runners are dangerous.. but not the bikers' fault. I always speed off first so I have an empty road ahead instead of having to slalom through dozens of bikes. But of course look carefully left and right before crossing the intersection. 

 "not really. It's just that it's harder to be an annoying <deleted> in Bangkok traffic on a big bike because many gaps are too tight."

I disagree with this one. I ride daily in Bangkok (both big bike and scooter) since 5 years and I've only ever had one big bike cut in front of me, compared to the hundreds (if not thousands) small bikes who mostly don't give a <deleted> where they're going. Most big bikers ride bikes because they want to ride bikes. Most small bike riders ride bikes because they can't afford a car - and therefore have zero interest in actually learning to ride. Sure, there are exceptions but on average the ones riding big bikes behave much better. 

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9 hours ago, Seismic said:

What about the many big bike riders who have been riding them for years, or even decades?. Again, an ill-thought out idea, with many questions still left unanswered. Another knee-jerk reaction to a problem that does not actually exist, from people with no expertise in the area.

Geez...talk about jumping the gun. Let things settle petal and the outcome will be revealed OK.

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Sigh.

One again, with typically mystical Thai flair, they've addressed a problem by totally sidestepping it and doing something else instead.

Thailand's biggest problem and mortality rate: young riders on little 'motorbikes'. But it's an enormous, out of control,  area with no way of fixing it. So target a smaller sector instead - 'big' bikes - and claim they're doin something positive to bring the accident rate down.

 

The irony is, to anyone with half a brain cell, that this is exactly the sector that has the least problems and accidents. Kids can't afford superbikes, so it's the older age group being targeted. And these are (in the main) experienced riders, most of them in responsible bikers' clubs, and all able to ride with some awareness and expertise.

"Special training"? These guys will probably ride rings around their embarrassed instructors.

Sigh again.

 

Edited by robsamui
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3 hours ago, tyga said:

Youth and motorcycles are a dangerous combination and those of us who survived,  can put this down mostly to good luck. I'm all for training and limiting the power/cc  licenses of new riders, especially younger ones. 

Good points, well put, Tyga 😉

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4 hours ago, Joinaman said:

does anyone even watch that video ?

Last time i was waiting in the Land office, i noted about 16 people on their phones and about 12 sleeping, with only a couple looking completely bored

Maybe a little different with the questions this time.

the attached should scare a few people.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1AGwbXfP4U1FY9RWHdZrTOWuGJIS2voAVSwskCa0LFHE/mobilebasic#heading=h.3bie6graezwd

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22 minutes ago, Peterphuket said:

Believe me, it is all over the country the same big problem, even in the remote area where I live.

In Europe we learn, how smaller there d*ck how more noise they make.

People with a to big motorbike, or to much noisy have an inferiority complex.

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The new license should be for all bikes above pedal power..... this may give or make all have better training. But in reality the only way to make the roads safer is better policing, and the only way for that to happen is better police. So the police are the ones that need better training, better knowledge, and spend more time enforcing the road rules that already exist.

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Pretending they care...

 

Replace the U-Turns with roundabouts!!! There you are. Road death halved at least but you don't care that much do you! No.

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As with all powerful vehicles, it is not the vehicle at fault, it is the idiot riding, or driving.

No point in stricter driving test or licence laws unless they are enforced, which we all know they are not and will not be

In a test of m/c riding skill, I would back a big bike rider against the average Thai rider any day.

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8 hours ago, cjinchiangrai said:

I think 300 may the largest Thai built bikes, the PCX and Forza, so protect the industry. That might be different now.

 

You are right, age matters.  The kids with their 1000cc crotch rockets are a menace to themselves and others. Not much better with a 125 Click.

 

The training would be easy for an experienced rider, so not a real problem. How much could it cost?  In the US it is about 7000 baht and they provide the bikes. It was really good and even for my little electric scooter, provided insights that have saved my life.

Cb500x is Thai built.

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1 hour ago, ICELANDMAN said:

Only 3 ? I guess you haven't traveled extensively in Thailand because the list would go up to at least 50

 

Just apply genuine common sense and you can forget these three areas. Oh! Wait! Common sense from Thais????

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9 hours ago, ThailandRyan said:

So lets take a look at the Yamaha MT-15, it is only a 155CC bike, yet can do 140 Km/H. Enough torque and 6 speeds to accelerate as fast as a larger bike and yet would not be considered a big bike.  You really have to wonder at what level of thinking the country is doing when it comes to calling a 400CC and over a big bike.Yamaha Motor India

 

Even the Kawasaki Ninja 400 would not be considered a big bike as it is only 399 CC and a top speed of 191 km/h.  Yet still not a big bike either according to the new law, just makes one kind of laugh at why the decided 400 cc's and above was a big bike.

1586817825-20ex400g-242wt1drf3cg-a-19104142414.png?crop=1xw:1xh;center,top&resize=480:*

I hate to break this to you, but if you think that a 155cc bike has the same acceleration as one with 600 and above then you’ve never ridden a big bike! There’s a MASSIVE difference in acceleration as well as top speed! 

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All any of this means is they looked to see how many bikes registered, multiply that by 500 baht (is it?)

and woohoo extra bucks coming

on another note
Yamaha, Honda, Kawasaki and suziki may all soon announce plans for new 399cc bikes available next February...😂

i was actually joking above with 399cc

but it seems there are a few bikes already on the market which are 398cc (not sure if any here)
although named xx400 etc
i wonder how these would be dealt with at traffic stops?

Edited by patman30
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