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44 minutes ago, bradiston said:

Do you mean depending on from whom the books are purchased?

Yes also the teacher's home country.

 

There really is no standard or curriculum.  It all depends on what boos the school buys

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I figure - if I heard it correctly  - its called pigeon or better pidjin English; spoken by all

and understood by few. That's pretty good since a lot of teachers weren't borne in an

English speaking couintry...........

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My dau, now 17 went to a reputable bi-lingual school (2-year waiting list to get into the school and pregnant mothers would enroll their child on the waiting list when they got pregnant with another child).  At first the school was fairly good but then began losing above 6th grade and expanding kindergarten as they could make more money that way.  In doing this, they cut loose many of the more experienced foreign teachers.  In grade 4 my dau brought home an English assignment of 15 sentences in which they were to identify the possessive pronouns.  I checked my daughter's work as she was having difficulty - 9 of he sentences had zero possessive pronouns.  I marked in red ink and a note for the teacher to contact me for further info.  She didn't and never corrected the students on that work so I went to chat with her.  She claimed only the school director could change any of the assignments and the Thai teachers were not allowed to use the farang teachers to correct any shortcomings.  I talked with the school director and after 20 minutes or so of her speaking of her credentials, she told me that she would not change any of the English assignments as she was more than qualified to do them.  The following year we relocated to a school with qualified English teachers for all the subjects other than foreign languages  and my daughter's English is as good as any of her peers if not better.  One school also informed the parents who had been complaining of the English being taught, were told that if necessary, the director would fire the farang teachers and hire filipino teachers for all the English-language classes.  My experience here about English language teaching is that foe the most part the Thai students will learn to read English but will suffer greatly in speaking.  Most that can afford it hire extra English classes on weekends etc.  

 

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1 minute ago, onebir said:

Not the reverse? (My impression is British English uses "got" less...)

 

An American will go into Starbucks and say "can I have a latte" (it's not a question).  A Brit will say "latte, please" (or an idiot word like "grande").

Many decades ago there was a snobbish attempt by Brits to eliminate "got" since it was somehow "infra dig" (or plebbish).

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8 minutes ago, Neeranam said:

My 17 year old used "I could care less" a few months ago. This one I corrected as it doesn't make sense to me. 

I think it works as a rhetorical question: "[And |Like ] I could care less?"

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9 minutes ago, blazes said:

Many decades ago there was a snobbish attempt by Brits to eliminate "got" since it was somehow "infra dig" (or plebbish).

Yeah, even "cool" sounded a bit weird in British English if you go back far enough. Now we're cool with it 😛

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Ask me if I give a sh yit or is it take a sh yit? Hawaiians speak pidgin English no matta The Hawaiian tour bus driver was asked on his tour how to pronounce Hawaii is it Hawaii or Havaii and he answered that you can pronounce it either way. As the tourist were departing the tour the Hawaiian tour bus driver was thanking them all for coming with him, one of the tourist said you are VELCOME 555

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On 10/28/2020 at 4:34 AM, EricTh said:

Do most Thai schools teach American English or British English? What I mean is the official curriculum books.

"Most Thai schools" probably teach Philippine English, whilst private schools might teach proper English, depending of curriculum and origination of teachers. Many, if not most, international schools, and some bi-lingual schools/English Program schools, teach Cambridge curriculum/books – primary English language, science and math – but teachers might originate from other areas.

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6 hours ago, blazes said:

 

An American will go into Starbucks and say "can I have a latte" (it's not a question).  A Brit will say "latte, please" (or an idiot word like "grande").

Many decades ago there was a snobbish attempt by Brits to eliminate "got" since it was somehow "infra dig" (or plebbish).

Actually to be really correct, it's May I have a latte.

 

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