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Almost 10% of candies, gum have harmful artificial colours: Medical Sciences Department


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Almost 10% of candies, gum have harmful artificial colours: Medical Sciences Department

By THE NATION

 

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Almost 10 per cent of candies and chewing gum contain exceeding amounts of artificial colours than those permitted by the Public Health Ministry, Department of Medical Sciences acting director-general Dr Supphakit Siriluck said on Tuesday.

 

“The department has carried out tests on 387 samples of candies and gum sent in by the manufacturers from 2017 to 2019 and found that 30 samples, or 9.8 per cent, have used an exceeding amount of artificial colouring or prohibited artificial colouring,” he said.

 

Supphakit explained that out of 147 samples of hard candies (which break down when chewed), seven samples, or 5.7 per cent, had erythrosine colours from 2.9 to 18 milligrams per kilogram. Out of 204 samples of soft candies (which do not break down when chewed), 21 samples, or 13.9 per cent, used erythrosine and erythrosine colours from 2.2 to 38.8 milligrams per kilogram. The latter is not allowed for use in candies. Meanwhile, out of 36 samples of gum, two samples, or 6.3 per cent, use quinoline yellow, which is not allowed in such gum.

 

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“The Public Health Ministry has allowed the use of artificial colours in limited amounts as specified in Ministerial Regulations No 389 BE 2561 [2018],” he pointed out. “These artificial colours can be harmful if consumed in high amounts or if they accumulate in the body over a long time, as they can obstruct the digestive system and cause flatulence, diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, reduced weight, inflammation of the kidney or liver, as well as cancer at the lymph nodes,” he warned.

 

“Consumers must check the package before buying candies or gum to see that these items have been registered with the Food and Drug Administration and display all ingredients and additions,” he said.

 

“Do not buy any of these if the package is damaged, torn or has a hole. Avoid buying candies that have too bright colours. Always store candies in a cold, dry place and away from sunlight and insects,” Supphakit advised.

 

“The Department of Medical Sciences will continue to conduct tests on food and consumer products and prevent those that could be harmful to consumers from hitting the market shelves,” he added.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30396900

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-10-28
 
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Dang! I just got a box of candles online and now they tell me I shouldn't chew them anymore. What is the world coming to?

Oh, candies... eyesight not what it once was.... never mind

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28 minutes ago, John Drake said:

M&Ms. "Melts in your mouth and not in your hands." Except in Thailand. Wondered why and saw the M&Ms sold in Thailand are made in China.

Chocolate here is basically hard fat. Whenever I bought real chocolate from Europe and brought it here, it would melt in the heat within minutes. The Thai candy bars you can put in the oven and they come out same.

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2 hours ago, Tarteso said:

The poison levels of sugars in those gums is not mentioned.

Yes indeed, and being a type 2 insulin dependent diabetic definitely "no no's" for me!

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2 hours ago, John Drake said:

M&Ms. "Melts in your mouth and not in your hands." Except in Thailand. Wondered why and saw the M&Ms sold in Thailand are made in China.

Should check if they glow in the dark too.

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2 hours ago, Lingba said:

almost 10%...maybe 90%...and its just not candies...so many other foods as well...this is nothing new

Today my GF told me our neighbours use pesticide every day on their cauliflower. Apparently makes them quite a bit of money (today neighbours earned 4000 THB), but they wouldn't eat it themselves.

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All candies are rubbish, but in my youth these would be special treats, not ingested on a regular basis. I can say the same about soft drinks and fast food. I doubt the odd candy, soft drink, or burgher here and there did much harm. The problem really came with increased prosperity, where people were ingesting this stuff as part of their normal diet. When I think back, a lot of the stuff we were eating was grown in the garden, or on the allotment. Fruit and nuts were a pretty rare commodity though, every Xmas us kids would get a bag full of the stuff, obviously someone thought this was a bit of a treat, really weird looking back, from a modern perspective.

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