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Young and non-white Britons likelier to lose jobs after furlough


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Young and non-white Britons likelier to lose jobs after furlough

By David Milliken

 

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Passengers are seen looking out of a pod of the London Eye wheel, with the British Union flag flying on the Houses of Parliament behind, in London, Britain, September 14, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville

 

LONDON (Reuters) - Twice as many young and non-white British workers have lost their jobs after going on furlough compared with the average, largely because they are more likely to work in sectors hit hardest by the coronavirus pandemic, a study showed.

 

The Resolution Foundation think tank said 19% of workers aged 18-24 and 22% of ethnic minority staff had lost their job after being furloughed, compared with 9% of employees overall.

 

The study was based on a survey of 6,000 people conducted in late September, carried out by polling company YouGov.

 

Job losses were most common in the hospitality and leisure sectors, and for those whose work was already insecure before the crisis - categories in which younger and non-white workers more commonly find themselves in Britain.

 

Race on its own did not seem to be a big factor but age did appear to play a partial role, with younger workers more likely to leave employment even after adjusting for some other factors.

 

“Worryingly, fewer than half of those who have lost their jobs during the pandemic have been able to find work since,” Resolution Foundation analyst Kathleen Henehan said.

 

“This suggests that even if the public health crisis recedes in a few months’ time, Britain’s jobs crisis will be with us for far longer.”

 

Few job seekers applied for roles outside the sectors where they had previously worked, due to a lack of other experience, raising the risk of long-term unemployment.

 

Some 9 million jobs - around a third of those in the private sector - were furloughed at the peak of the pandemic, with employees receiving 80% of their normal pay.

 

Slightly over 2 million jobs remain partly or fully furloughed.

 

Britain’s unemployment rate stood at 4.5% in the three months to August, according to official data. The Resolution Foundation estimated the jobless rate in September was around 7%, rising to 20% for those aged 18-24.

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-10-28
 
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Well, as businesses also tend to get rid of more senior employees because they are too well paid and  may not be adaptable enough, I wonder who'll be left?

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9 hours ago, baansgr said:

Yougov, funded by the taxpayer...wonder how many front line workers salaries could have been paid instead of wasting it on useless dribble that does nothing more than divide people

 

YouGov has no connection with the British government and is not funded by the taxpayer. It is a public company listed on the London stock exchange, so you can buy shares in it if you want.

 

So the answer to your question is; none.

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4 hours ago, 7by7 said:

 

YouGov has no connection with the British government and is not funded by the taxpayer. It is a public company listed on the London stock exchange, so you can buy shares in it if you want.

 

So the answer to your question is; none.

I know the history of the company but the UK Government elect and pay them to do certain surveys...

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1 hour ago, evadgib said:

Several reports seen/heard yesterday shown ethnic white Brits are 5th on lists of this nature.

HTH

 

Don't believe you

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8 hours ago, baansgr said:

I know the history of the company but the UK Government elect and pay them to do certain surveys...

 

From the OP it would appear that this survey was commissioned by the Resolution Foundation; which like YouGov has no connection with the government

 

No idea what you mean by "the UK government elect.......them."

 

As for the government paying them to carry out surveys on it's behalf;  yes, YouGov does carry out public sector and not for profit research; as do other polling companies. If the government want to gauge public opinion on a matter, how do you suggest they do so without employing a polling company such as YouGov?

 

I have no idea when the UK government last commissioned such a poll; do you?

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