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I've been a landlord in UK and US for close to 15 years, but decided to rent here as it seemed to make the most sense, but a recent experience has me questioning that.

 

One night while I slept, the toilet hose failed and a split developed. It was a cheap, old hose and the landlord should have replaced it some time ago. I always make it a point as a tenant to never change anything related to water or electric supply, as I don't want any liability issues.

 

However, in this case, despite the hose being an old, cheap substandard plastic hose with no interior or exterior protection, the landlord had me compensate the condo below from the water that seeped below. Thankfully, it was not a large sum. Despite telling the landlord that I thought that was 100% wrong, he kept with charging me.

 

I know if that happened in the UK or USA, as a landlord, I would be 100% liable for any damage caused and obviously I have insurance to cover such circumstances. I also make darn sure that everything is up to code and as reliable as possible.  I am also responsible for replacing any equipment that fails, such as ovens, microwaves or air conditioning units.

 

I'm now worried that Thailand operates differently and I could be liable for failings of my landlord to have such fittings not up to code or indeed anything that stops working through normal use. If that is the case, I clearly need to reconsider if renting is the best policy for me.

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I am a landlord here too,but i look after my tenants,most stay a very long time, you have to look after them,as finding good /any tenants is not easy,the way things are at the moment, an emp

Rent on the ground floor if it worries you so much.

This is an out and out con.....no way are you responsible.....he would have done well to get a penny out of me.   He would have show you were negligent or there was a dereliction of duty.

12 minutes ago, w94005m said:

I'm now worried that Thailand operates differently and I could be liable for failings of my landlord to have such fittings not up to code or indeed anything that stops working through normal use. If that is the case, I clearly need to reconsider if renting is the best policy for me.

Move out and move often, only rent new places each time you move.

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5 minutes ago, Peterw42 said:

What does your lease say ? It can be that the tenant is responsible for repairs in Thailand and there would be a clause in the lease that says as much.

 

 

Nothing stated

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46 minutes ago, w94005m said:

Thanks and disappointingly, this is a farang landlord, which was what shocked me even more.

Why more shocked? There's 'good' and not 'so good' landlords and tenants throughout the world. Your landlord  seems to belong in the second category. Although I doubt the sudden mass failure scenario, I'm sure a suitable compromise should have been possible.

 

If your statements are correct; dump the landlord, rental properties are hardly a scarcity these days. If not dump them anyway, as it's unlikely they would have your best interests at heart after your malignment.

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35 minutes ago, Grumpy one said:

Looks like replacing the hose yourself may have been the smarter option 

In hindsight, but despite doing a lot of fully inspected plumbing and electrical work in the US, I didn't want to be in any way liable should something happen on utility supply. I'd already installed a trap on the kitchen sink as unsurprisingly, I did not want sewer gas in the apartment, but there's no question of any problem with that.

 

Never guessed that he would make me liable  anyway. Of course I've done that now with a suitable stainless steel coated and interior braided hose.

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1 hour ago, alacrity said:

Why more shocked? There's 'good' and not 'so good' landlords and tenants throughout the world. Your landlord  seems to belong in the second category. Although I doubt the sudden mass failure scenario, I'm sure a suitable compromise should have been possible.

 

If your statements are correct; dump the landlord, rental properties are hardly a scarcity these days. If not dump them anyway, as it's unlikely they would have your best interests at heart after your malignment.

I mistakenly thought there would be more familiarity with normal landlord responsibilities.

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