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Hi, I would be extremely grateful for a little advice.

 

Long story short, my son (M1 in a government school) has learning dificulties to the extent that he cannot get to grips with Maths or Science. He had tests last week and failed both. Today he and (actually , quite a few of his peers) have to re-test. 

 

I can't get any logical answers form anyone about what happens if he fails again. Do schools kick low performing students out? Does he just get a low grade? I would like to be clear so as to prepare. His Mum doesnt seem to care one way or another and is reluctant to call the school. I could do myself but my Thai is not so fluent.

 

If anyone could give any knowledge on the subject then that would be great. 

 

For the record, he is doing just fine in English, he has skills outside of academia ( he can cook great thai food and wants to be a chef), and we both know that he isnt going to go to University so i dont care too much with low grades. i just dont want him kicked out of school at M1

 

Thanks

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I like this point, Thai neighbors son was totally lost and confused in maths and at about P4 it got to the stage he completed maybe 20% of the questions at each exam.   Boys Thai father is a

The OP is asking what are the consequences of failure within the school system...not how to make his son a genius at maths!

Glad you're happy with the answers that didn't address your question. So here's another one.   He's good at English, good at the subject he wants to take up as a career (chef), so why the co

Have a look at the maths factor by carol vorderman. My daughter uses this and her maths is improved exponentially. It's fun and carol explains how to solve problems very well. I believe you can trial it for free and then it's £12.50 a quarter.

https://www.themathsfactor.com/?gclid=CjwKCAiAtK79BRAIEiwA4OskBiICeUyTUdxny00KhL6XTBUZUjcSrV-ozmAJds2GCJVqWyfzCQqAlxoCoQ0QAvD_BwE

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Total speculation on my part to say you/your son has nothing to worry about (no chance of failing out). 

 

A few years ago (2010), they conducted nationwide tests on Teacher competency (ie. testing them in their respective subjects).  The failure rate for math was in the double digits.  That sounds ok ie. if it is say 10-20%, but in fact it was a whopping 84%.  Not sure if I can link to BKK Post here, but "Thailand teachers failing their own subject" should bring it up as the first result in Google.

 

Found this link while I was drafting this. - https://www.ajarn.com/blogs/mark-brown/problems-with-the-thai-public-education-system - (you may want to email the person who wrote that article.  

 

Also, a link to an academic paper - seems like Thailand has a "No fail policy" for sometime now.  At most sounds like your son may need to take a few days of remedial classes, if that.  https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/81715653.pdf

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Get him tutor outside for these subject, don't pay the school teachers on Sat to do it they are usually just after the money. Tempt him with some incentive if he does better get him off the phone internet playing games. The government schools will just move him along especially if he isn't causing any problems in the classroom but when he is Fifteen even a Government school isn't going to take him with his grades you will most likely have to buy his way if they don't most likely suggest a school like Techno this was exactly the case with my son he learns a trade at the same time also gets class work. It wasn't until he went to a Techno school (paid not government)  a change that he went from 1.9 to 3.6

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1 hour ago, HarrySeaman said:

This is a similar story to that of a Japanese father, Toru Kumon, a Japanese educator, in 1958.  He started teaching his son at home at night using a series of work sheets he developed.  Don't be put off by the fact that is it rote memorization based because, simply put, it works extremely well for subjects like simple math, history, or language learning.  Here is a link to the Wikipedia page:   Wikipedia - Kumon.

 

This method is now used for many subjects and the worksheets can be purchased in many languages from a company named Kumon.  Here is a link to the math program.

Kumon Math Program

I would recommend Kumon also. Both my kids do some every day. No screens until completed. Typically 10-15 mins needed a day.

 

Needs to be managed as they are inclined, in my experience, to give too much homework, so as to provide value for money to parents. A couple of pages each day working the way up through the basics can do wonders. Not just in terms of passing exams, but in terms of confidence and not being intimidated by maths. 

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1 hour ago, Surelynot said:

The OP is asking what are the consequences of failure within the school system...not how to make his son a genius at maths!

Exactly. Not one of the first several responses actually addressed the OP's question.

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17 hours ago, nikmar said:

thanks, but im also accepting any advice. Im quite concerned about him.

At age 7 my son didn't fail his tests but to me his maths was virtually non existent. Talked to the teacher who said his maths was fine. She made him follow numbers on a board from 1 to 10. Fine. I then wrote the number 5 down on a piece of paper and asked him to name it. Not a clue. Teaching by rote in the extreme. He now has maths lessons with a private tutor twice per week and is improving well.

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Math is a necessary skill in life. Surely this isn't the first sign of being deficient in math. Help him with multiplication and division. I doubt in a gov school they go into algebra or geometry.

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