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20 minutes ago, baansgr said:

Thai constitution guarantees minimum 9 years of free education...is it a Go vernment achool

yep. government school. 40 in his class

 

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I like this point, Thai neighbors son was totally lost and confused in maths and at about P4 it got to the stage he completed maybe 20% of the questions at each exam.   Boys Thai father is a

The OP is asking what are the consequences of failure within the school system...not how to make his son a genius at maths!

Glad you're happy with the answers that didn't address your question. So here's another one.   He's good at English, good at the subject he wants to take up as a career (chef), so why the co

On 11/16/2020 at 7:41 AM, nikmar said:

yep. government school. 40 in his class

 

Generally, the student will be asked to do a  retest. How that is done will depend on the teacher and possibly the school and their policy. many schools will just say "up to you" to the teachers as to how they retest. I usually have a few fail each year. I will give some review work and ask the students to complete that first. I will check it and if it looks OK I will allow them to retest. I usually use questions that are on the review sheet. This may sound silly, but you would be surprised how difficult it is for some of the students to redo questions they have already done. 

Schools really don't like to fail any students, especially if the problem is just one subject. My school has occasionally asked a student to leave after M3. These are students who generally fail multiple subjects and over many years. 

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The system in Thailand is different from some western countries.   If you fail a subject, you fail the year.  So there isn't a mechanism, except for the retest, to pass the subject and the grade.  

 

I taught for a number of years and was involved in administrative work in a number of schools.  In 25+ years, I only knew of one student who failed and repeated a grade and that was a G. 1 student and the parents were a strong force in wanting him to repeat the grade.   It was a great decision for that youngster.  He went on to do very well all the way through high school and has now graduated from University and is working on his Master's Degree.

 

Regardless of your sons plans, if possible try to get him the help he needs to pass the test and move one. 

 

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Hi, sorry for late reply. Maybe as people suggested you can find stuff online, there are also excellent tutorials on youtube. The trick is to find a format / channel that your son likes and is not too fast (some are really excellent). It's probably best to get your son to chose the support material as opposed to chosing for him (even if he does not chose the best one but choses one he likes he's halfway there). Good luck

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On 11/13/2020 at 8:52 AM, HarrySeaman said:

This is a similar story to that of a Japanese father, Toru Kumon, a Japanese educator, in 1958.  He started teaching his son at home at night using a series of work sheets he developed.  Don't be put off by the fact that is it rote memorization based because, simply put, it works extremely well for subjects like simple math, history, or language learning.  Here is a link to the Wikipedia page:   Wikipedia - Kumon.

 

This method is now used for many subjects and the worksheets can be purchased in many languages from a company named Kumon.  Here is a link to the math program.

Kumon Math Program

GF's daughter goes to Kumon. Progressing very well. Pleased with results so far.

Gone through addition and subtraction. Just started multiplication.

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Either the problem is with the teachers, or your son. Some kids are numerate dyslexic. Some freeze when it's an exam, they need to be helped with breaking the cycle.

I'd suggest sitting down with him and working through the maths problems together. If you can't do it, how can you expect him to?

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I could not understand and always failed the tests until age 16. Guess I just didn't have interest for it and didn't get it at that age, preferred playing outside.

 

But I am good with it now since over a decade already, actually I even became a programmer lol. Wouldn't worry too much about it, it isn't that important as it used to be, knowing computers are not leaving and AI is only getting better by the day.

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