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New lens in eyes, short and long


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My wife now needs to wear glasses all the time. They don’t sit well on her noise at all and she really feels uncomfortable wearing them.

 

She is not at all keen  on a nose job.

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Her eye doctor has said that fitting new progressive lens is not really an option, I think due to something being too thin and that is also why she can’t have the laser thing.  

 

So she has decided to go with the ‘new lens’ but one long sight and one short sight. Apparently this way is not that uncommon.  Has anyone had this done, it worries me that she may have to still wear glasses if things are not that successful and she will actually be worse off.

 

I am keeping out of the decision but am somewhat worried about it. She is 65 years old if that makes a difference.

 

Please any experiences …. tks

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Mine were done with a distance lens in both eyes. I can read anything from about 60cm onwards, so driving a car and reading the dash is perfect, but I need them for reading and on the PC, so glasses must always be at hand, I have a fold up pair in my pocket if out, 29bht at Mr.DIY, Tesco pair at home for the reading thingy.😊

 

Sorry that doesn't answer your question but something to tell the mrs...

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Can't speak from personal experience but it is a well known, and tested, option.

 

Seemingly takes a little while for the brain to adjust but then good results. No harm in trying, only thing to lose is a little time and a few Bhat, no long lasting affects such as can happen with Lasik etc.

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Are we talking contact lens or actual lens implant?  The one long one short is sometimes used for implant lens after cataract operations but need to be sure brain can adapt first I believe (not everyone can adapt from my understanding).  If she does not have cataracts I would not be keen on operation, as safe as it normally is, but understand that is her decision.  Has she tried different glasses frames?  There can be a huge difference in how they fit.  

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As above - are you taking about contacts or lens implant?

 

If lens implant I suggest first doing a trial with contact lends to make sure she can adjust to monovision. Some people can but some can't and you don't want to find this out after surgery.

 

P.S. that would be a thin cornea

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27 minutes ago, lopburi3 said:

Are we talking contact lens or actual lens implant?

 

Excellent point; I jumped straight to contact lenses. Lens implants on the other hand I'd be a bit wary of.

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1 hour ago, JAS21 said:

My wife now needs to wear glasses all the time. They don’t sit well on her noise at all and she really feels uncomfortable wearing them.

Did you visit a good optician?

I am sure there are frames for any kind of faces and noses. Many have adjustable pads for the nose.

That's what I would try first.

If you are in Bangkok and need a good optician PM me.

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On 11/13/2020 at 12:13 PM, Sheryl said:

As above - are you taking about contacts or lens implant?

 

If lens implant I suggest first doing a trial with contact lends to make sure she can adjust to monovision. Some people can but some can't and you don't want to find this out after surgery.

 

P.S. that would be a thin cornea

Yes it is Implant.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/14/2020 at 2:43 AM, JAS21 said:

I think dry eyes rules those out 

 

Sorry to come in on this so late, but I did the contact lens version of short-sighted in one eye and long-sighted in the other for a number of years, and it was no problem for me at all.  BUT, as mentioned above not everybody can adapt to that.

 

I know she's having problems with glasses, but if she can't experiment with contact lenses, how about getting glasses with two different lenses just long enough to see if her brain can handle the one short/one long eye method?  It would just be short term - maybe a week or so? - just to see if she can handle two different eye corrections without dizziness, headaches, eyestrain, etc.

 

Is the problem with glasses that they don't stay up on her nose?  If so, there are elastic bands that go behind the head to hold the glasses up.  Again, just short-term to see if the long/short-sight eye thing works for her.

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5 hours ago, wpcoe said:

Is the problem with glasses that they don't stay up on her nose?  If so, there are elastic bands that go behind the head to hold the glasses up.

Believe there are also rubberized type nose pads that are much better than smooth plastic.  

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I'd recommend a visit to Doctor Vision, near The Mall Bang Kapi

 

http://doctorvision.net

 

Scleral multifocal contact lenses may be an option for Presbyopia and dry eye issues...

 

Dr Bird there is an Optometrist, and I'm extremely happy with what I've ended up with...

 

The full but condensed story is

  • I was short sighted when younger - glasses.
  • then tried hard (RGP) contact lenses, as my elder sisters were happy with them. Could NOT get comfortable with them at all, tried for two weeks but never got past the feeling of grit in the eye... so
  • Soft contact lenses - in those days monthly disposable I think... evetually went to daily disposable when they came out and even tried the constant/overnight wearable ones... which were fabulous for a while before my eyes decided they didn't like that at all and couldn't wear soft contact lenses for more than a couple of hours at most after that
  • the horror of having to go back to glasses,  meant as soon as i could i got PRK laser surgery... this was before the flap Lasik version (over 25 years ago). Had to do one eye and then wait 6 months before the second... and a week of recovery was unpleasant, but still a great and wonderful thing. (Also corrected a lot of the astigmatism I had as well as the myopia).
  • Many years later... Presbyopia started - this is NOT 'long sight' (hyperopia). You can have perfect 20/20 vision when younger and once in your 40s to 50s start getting presbyopia, where you can still focus on distant objects but struggle to read newspapers etc and find your arms aren't long enough 😉
  • @sigh@ thought as I was now older, glasses would be ok... and modern progressive lenses are very good indeed (get an extra pair of 'office specific' ones for computer and office work with wide screen monitors also... massive help)
  • Fed up with sweat, steaming up, rain etc etc all the usual , so went to Doctor Vision - went there as they were the only place that did hybrid contact lenses with a soft skirt and hard centre lens "Synergeyes".
  • Huzzah - after examination etc he suggested Scleral contact lenses instead. These are large hard  (rigid gas permeable) lenses... and I pointed out I could not use the smaller corneal RGP hard lenses, but he was right. Oddly, the larger diameter means the edge sits under your eyelid and so is very quickly ass comfortable as a soft lens... maybe MORE comfortable if prone to dry eye - the scleral lens does not touch the cornea, it  sits on the white of the eyes (the sclera) and has a saline filled gap between lens and cornea... so you get the rigid lens precise correction and cure of astigmatism.
  • Scleral - don't move around on your eye and due to the edge sitting under the eyelid they won't pop out ('fall out') like the small ones can, and due to their stability they also are available for presbyopia...
  • 'Monovision' is the term for correcting one eye for distance vision (so correct it to '20/20') and the other eye is deliberately corrected to be short sighted... It's an older and common method... and i tried it - but the issue is intermediate vision is not so good- i.e. around computer screen distance....
  • I instead have multifocal scleral lenses - much superior, and comfortable for reading to intermediate to sports and distance, working etc. Obviously ridiculously tiny lettering as found on medicine bottles is another thing, but I've been delighted with the lenses. Dr Bird designed them to be left eye more distance and right more reading (as I'm left eye dominant) but due to their multifocal design they blend in with intermediate vision too - far superior to monovision.

 

Sorry about the long post... but hope it makes clear I've had 'some' experience in this area 😉

 

and note  - he  (and other eye specialists) do NOT normally recommend eye lens replacement except when necessary due to cataracts... in which case then multifocal eye lens replacement may be an option, but even now they are not as reliable from what i've gathered on eye lens replascements ( a couple of family members have recently had double cataract surgery and have 'regular' lenses so corrected for distance and then just need 'readers'... which are a lot easier and cheaper then the best progressive lenses)

Edited by coops
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8 hours ago, coops said:

'Monovision' is the term for correcting one eye for distance vision (so correct it to '20/20') and the other eye is deliberately corrected to be short sighted... It's an older and common method... and i tried it - but the issue is intermediate vision is not so good- i.e. around computer screen distance....

 

I didn't have any problem with intermediate vision with monovision (I had forgotten the term) so that's probably another thing to be alert for if she wants to do a trial of monovision.

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